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Teaching neural networking to teenagers...

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Anonymous
December 19, 2004 9:26:54 AM

Archived from groups: comp.ai.neural-nets,comp.ai.games,comp.ai.edu (More info?)

I'm a computer science teacher at a small high school.

I've been experimenting using BugBrain (
http://www.biologic.com.au/bugbrain ) as part of the curriculum.

Can anyone point me to some neural networking / genetic programming
resources (systems or websites) that I might might be suitable for
teenagers (ages 12 - 18)?

Thanks in advance,

/leebert

PS.... BugBrain has the right mix of eye candy, logic and intuition that
it fits the limited contact hours these kids get on a computer. I tried
teaching pure programming (and Python at that) but computer
programming's just a shade over their heads right off.

But somehow, BugBrain is "just right." Interestingly, teen girls have an
"intuitive" advantage over the boys in solving the problems set out in
Bug Brain.
December 21, 2004 11:25:15 AM

Archived from groups: comp.ai.neural-nets,comp.ai.games,comp.ai.edu (More info?)

leebert wrote:
>
> I'm a computer science teacher at a small high school.
>
> I've been experimenting using BugBrain (
> http://www.biologic.com.au/bugbrain ) as part of the curriculum.
>
> Can anyone point me to some neural networking / genetic programming
> resources (systems or websites) that I might might be suitable for
> teenagers (ages 12 - 18)?
>
> Thanks in advance,
>
> /leebert
>
> PS.... BugBrain has the right mix of eye candy, logic and intuition that
> it fits the limited contact hours these kids get on a computer. I tried
> teaching pure programming (and Python at that) but computer
> programming's just a shade over their heads right off.
>
> But somehow, BugBrain is "just right." Interestingly, teen girls have an
> "intuitive" advantage over the boys in solving the problems set out in
> Bug Brain.
>
>
>

I've only recently started playing with the idea of ANNs. I thought
this site had a fairly good description of how things work.

http://rfhs8012.fh-regensburg.de/~saj39122/jfroehl/dipl...

I think it was actually for someone's thesis.

--
Good judgement comes from bad experience. Alot of that comes from bad
judgement...
Anonymous
December 26, 2004 3:30:25 PM

Archived from groups: comp.ai.neural-nets,comp.ai.games,comp.ai.edu (More info?)

leebert wrote:

>
> I'm a computer science teacher at a small high school.
>
> I've been experimenting using BugBrain (
> http://www.biologic.com.au/bugbrain ) as part of the curriculum.
>
> Can anyone point me to some neural networking / genetic programming
> resources (systems or websites) that I might might be suitable for
> teenagers (ages 12 - 18)?
>
> Thanks in advance,
>
> /leebert
>
> PS.... BugBrain has the right mix of eye candy, logic and intuition that
> it fits the limited contact hours these kids get on a computer. I tried
> teaching pure programming (and Python at that) but computer
> programming's just a shade over their heads right off.
>
> But somehow, BugBrain is "just right." Interestingly, teen girls have an
> "intuitive" advantage over the boys in solving the problems set out in
> Bug Brain.

Interesting!

Now, this may not be what you're looking for, but anyway:
http://www.vrspace.org/
http://sf.net/projects/vrspace/

Kids just love it. Girls love dressing puppets and chatting. I've tried
it with kids from 5 to... 80:)  Nothing systematic, just here and there.
Each girl who tried talked to alice at least half an hour.
Sure, the tech involved far too complex for kids, but AIML is quite
close to natural language, much closer to human reasoning than any
programming language, and quite interactive, especially in VRSpace as
bots can interact with virtual environment. It's also very good
documented and supported, for that part check
http://www.alicebot.org/

Regards...
!