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BSOD - IRQL Not Less or Equal

Last response: in Windows 7
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April 17, 2012 7:07:12 PM

Hi, I'm hoping you guys can help me with this issue. My PC seems to be getting a blue screen indicating "IRQL Not Less or Equal" with bccode d1 I believe. This occurred after I dusted out my pc, where I had disconnected all peripherals. Afterwards I ran Prime95 to see if my temps where better and I instantly got the bsod. I restarted and almost instantly got it again.

My PC is Overclocked, but I've been running the overclock for almost 2 years now, it never gave me this bsod on initial setup.

Yesterday, I moved my PC To a new case, full tower, and I ran prime95 at night for temp curiosity and found the blue screen upon waking up.

Could this issue be with windows installing USB drivers for same item in different ports? I checked devices and saw a lot of USB stuff... I assume some/maybe a lot are repeats....

Currently running memtest to rule out my ram dying.

Thanks for any help!

More about : bsod irql equal

a b $ Windows 7
April 17, 2012 8:09:46 PM

Your overclock is unstable. That particular error is highly indicative of CPU instability.

Overclocking your CPU drastically shortens the lifespan of it. CPUs are binned with a vcore that will last for several years while staying within the processor's designed TDP. Over time the amount of voltage required for stable operation increases to the point where the stock vcore is no longer suitable and the customer must either bump it up or replace the part. Most processors will be replaced long before this happens but overclocking shortens the lifetime dramatically. Either bump up your voltages until it's stable again or lower your overclock.
April 17, 2012 8:30:24 PM

You're probably right, didn't consider this for some reason. Since I found a stable OC, I didn't even consider that I'd have to up the vcore. Thanks!
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a b $ Windows 7
April 17, 2012 8:46:59 PM

Yup. That'll happen. CPUs are shipped with plenty of vcore overhead at stock settings but when you overclock you're typically going to find the lowest stable vcore and as such there's very little headroom. As it creeps up over time you will have to increase it accordingly. Try bumping it up a few notches along with the PLL voltage
a b $ Windows 7
April 18, 2012 12:16:16 PM

Could be a bad OC, though IRQL BSOD's generally indicate either a driver problem or bad RAM. If you had a bad OC, I'd expect 0x124 [WHEA_UNCORRECTABLE_ERROR] over an IRQL error...
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