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How to find ip of repeater

Last response: in Networking
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July 18, 2012 9:56:31 AM

My main router Asus RT-N10E has DHCP enabled. Two tplink 150RE repeaters are linked wirelessly to it (lets call them repeater 1 and 2). A dlink DIR600 is connected to asus router as an AP using cat6 cable. Another repeater ( call it repeater 3) is linked wirelessly to dlink AP.

Everything worked fine till I tried to change the password.

At the time of set up I had disabled dhcp in all execpt the main asus router ( it was configured by my ISP so i am a little skeptical about disturbing its settings).
Had manually assigned IP to all of them
asus- 192.168.1.1
dlink AP 192.168.1.2
Repeater 1- 192.168.1.251
Repeater 2- Forgot
Repeater 3- 192.168.1.254

My asus router keeps changing my APs IP.To access my APs settings I have to go to asus status>dhpc lease to find my APs ip listed in there. I cannot find Repeater 2 IP there. Fortunately repeater 1 ip is still same. I cant access Repeater 3 as well. Dlink AP shows only mac id of connected repeater 3.

Question 1)How can I find the Ip of these repeaters????

Also I have password enabled on all devices. How do i periodically change it. its too tedious to access each device and change password. moreover if you change APs password before changing the password listed in repeaters setting, the repeater setting becomes un accessible wirelessly.
Question 2. how to manage the passwords????
Question 3. What happens if I disable DHCP on main router?

More about : find repeater

Best solution

July 18, 2012 12:27:06 PM

Sounds like you're using DHCP to assign the IP of the DIR600 (AP), which is why you're having so much trouble. You should assign a STATIC IP instead, so it never changes. In fact, ALL your APs and repeaters should be STATIC IPs, never use DHCP for infrastructure devices (routers, repeaters, bridges, etc.).

As far as passwords, why keep changing them? As long as you're using strong passwords, it's silly to keep changing it, whether it's the UI's password or wireless key. It's virtually impossible to crack these w/ WPA/WPA2 enabled. So unless you have suspicion these have been compromised, leave them alone. Or worst case, perhaps change them every 6-12 months.
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July 18, 2012 7:05:34 PM

have you tried a tracerout to the asus?
or a network scan then browse to the webfront end.

tracert
click start type cmd
type tracert 192.168.1.1

this should show you all the hops to get to the asus the second hop would be repeater 2

install advanced ip scanner and scan the subnet 192.168.1.1 -192.168.1.254
http://www.angryip.org/w/Home

right click on all the "alive" ip's on your subnet and select "http" ( excluding the ones you can identify ) and if the device has a webfront end it will bring you to the webpage.
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July 19, 2012 2:49:37 PM

Best answer selected by manishpmch.
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July 19, 2012 3:06:07 PM

Thanks eibgrad and randini for your replies. angry ip helped.
So do I disable DHCP on asus router as well???
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July 19, 2012 4:38:19 PM

Let's make a distinction between DHCP "client" vs. DHCP "server".

You want *one* and only one DHCP server on your network, and it should be running on the same device that's providing the internet connection, which in this case is the ASUS router. That ASUS router uses a DHCP "client" to get its own public IP and other TCP/IP settings from the ISP’s DHCP “server”. In turn, all your devices behind the ASUS router use their respective DHCP "clients" to get their private IPs and other TCP/IP settings from the ASUS DHCP “server”. We're only making an exception for your other infrastructure devices (secondary routers, repeaters, bridges, etc.). Those devices should set their IPs and other TCP/IP settings *manually*, using static IP assignments, NOT a DHCP "client".

I know it sounds a bit confusing, all this jumping between DHCP client/server, but once you let it soak in a bit, hopefully it will make sense. We just don’t want your infrastructure devices (other than the primary router) using a DHCP client to configure themselves, they should all be STATIC.

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July 22, 2012 8:11:23 AM

eibgrad said:
Let's make a distinction between DHCP "client" vs. DHCP "server".

You want *one* and only one DHCP server on your network, and it should be running on the same device that's providing the internet connection, which in this case is the ASUS router. That ASUS router uses a DHCP "client" to get its own public IP and other TCP/IP settings from the ISP’s DHCP “server”. In turn, all your devices behind the ASUS router use their respective DHCP "clients" to get their private IPs and other TCP/IP settings from the ASUS DHCP “server”. We're only making an exception for your other infrastructure devices (secondary routers, repeaters, bridges, etc.). Those devices should set their IPs and other TCP/IP settings *manually*, using static IP assignments, NOT a DHCP "client".

I know it sounds a bit confusing, all this jumping between DHCP client/server, but once you let it soak in a bit, hopefully it will make sense. We just don’t want your infrastructure devices (other than the primary router) using a DHCP client to configure themselves, they should all be STATIC.



Thanks a lot.
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