Instrumentation on "Wouldn't It Be Nice"??

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

My buddy and I are discussing the stringed instrument that opens up
the Beach Boys classic "Wouldn't It Be Nice".
I think it's a harp. He disagrees.
Any die hard Beach Boys fans know what was used?
49 answers Last reply
More about instrumentation wouldn nice
  1. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    Hmmmmm..........Mellotron and French horn? Just a guess.


    "JMS" <Onajemusic1@aol.com> wrote in message
    news:acfc943a.0407290819.29a3cdb5@posting.google.com...
    > My buddy and I are discussing the stringed instrument that opens up
    > the Beach Boys classic "Wouldn't It Be Nice".
    > I think it's a harp. He disagrees.
    > Any die hard Beach Boys fans know what was used?
  2. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    Oops........maybe Synclavier? Did they even have Synclavier's back in 66?

    "Animix" <animix_spamless_@animas.net> wrote in message
    news:ceb8im024or@enews2.newsguy.com...
    > Hmmmmm..........Mellotron and French horn? Just a guess.
    >
    >
    > "JMS" <Onajemusic1@aol.com> wrote in message
    > news:acfc943a.0407290819.29a3cdb5@posting.google.com...
    > > My buddy and I are discussing the stringed instrument that opens up
    > > the Beach Boys classic "Wouldn't It Be Nice".
    > > I think it's a harp. He disagrees.
    > > Any die hard Beach Boys fans know what was used?
    >
    >
  3. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    Animix wrote:

    > Oops........maybe Synclavier? Did they even have Synclavier's back in 66?


    No.
  4. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    JMS wrote:

    > My buddy and I are discussing the stringed instrument that opens up
    > the Beach Boys classic "Wouldn't It Be Nice".
    > I think it's a harp. He disagrees.
    > Any die hard Beach Boys fans know what was used?


    I believe it's a "section" of guitars.

    Check out the "Pet Sounds" Box Set.
  5. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    "Animix" <animix_spamless_@animas.net> wrote in message news:<ceb9hn025l1@enews2.newsguy.com>...
    > Oops........maybe Synclavier? Did they even have Synclavier's back in 66?
    >
    > "Animix" <animix_spamless_@animas.net> wrote in message
    > news:ceb8im024or@enews2.newsguy.com...
    > > Hmmmmm..........Mellotron and French horn? Just a guess.

    Ha ha. Mellotron, french horn, synclavier? You're way off man, it
    was obviously a DX7!

    Seriously though I would have voted for harp but the "section of
    guitars" idea sounds plausible.
  6. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    On Thu, 29 Jul 2004 14:08:30 -0400, Don Cooper
    <dcooper28800@comcast.net> wrote:

    >
    >
    >Animix wrote:
    >
    >> Oops........maybe Synclavier? Did they even have Synclavier's back in 66?
    >
    >
    >No.

    No Mellotrons either.
  7. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    Onajemusic1@aol.com (JMS) wrote in message news:<acfc943a.0407290819.29a3cdb5@posting.google.com>...
    > My buddy and I are discussing the stringed instrument that opens up
    > the Beach Boys classic "Wouldn't It Be Nice".
    > I think it's a harp. He disagrees.
    > Any die hard Beach Boys fans know what was used?


    'Twas a ukulele.

    And basically, the intro was a double-time of what was to transpire in
    the middle part of the song ("maybe iiff we think and wish and hope
    and pray, it might come true, ....").


    Not sure if it was a real koa wood uke or not.


    JF
  8. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    On Jul 29, 2004, JMS <Onajemusic1@aol.com> commented:

    > My buddy and I are discussing the stringed instrument that opens up
    > the Beach Boys classic "Wouldn't It Be Nice".
    > I think it's a harp. He disagrees.
    > Any die hard Beach Boys fans know what was used?
    >--------------------------------snip----------------------------------<

    I believe it's a circus calliope-type organ that opens up this track, not a
    stringed instrument at all. There's also some double-accordion here and
    there that was arranged in a way to resemble strings, but those are
    definitely keyboards.

    This is all discussed at length in the book

    WOULDN'T IT BE NICE:
    Brian Wilson and the Making of The Beach Boys' PET SOUNDS
    by Charles L. Granata
    published by Chicago Review Press (2003)
    ISBN #1556525079

    which goes into infinite detail on this song and many others on the album.

    --MFW
    [remove the extra M above for email]
  9. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    << I believe it's a "section" of guitars. >>


    Including, I believe, Barney Kessel and Glen Campbell. A Vox Mandoguitar was
    used. Another electric mandolin of some sort... Fender, prolly.

    By all means get the box set.


    searching for peace, love and quality footwear
    guido

    http://www.guidotoons.com
    http://www.theloniousmoog.com
    http://www.luckymanclark.com
  10. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    "playon" <playonATcomcast.net> wrote in message
    news:kfljg0ho0v3qqpaj7ojj3cfjl8bmeth2ga@4ax.com...
    > On Thu, 29 Jul 2004 14:08:30 -0400, Don Cooper
    > <dcooper28800@comcast.net> wrote:
    >
    > >
    > >
    > >Animix wrote:
    > >
    > >> Oops........maybe Synclavier? Did they even have Synclavier's back in
    66?
    > >
    > >
    > >No.
    >
    > No Mellotrons either.

    Yeah, they did. They used them on "Penny Lane", which was recorded in, I
    believe, the fall of '66. Before that, I think they were used to generate
    laugh tracks for sitcoms (really).

    Peace,
    Paul
  11. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    On Fri, 30 Jul 2004 06:35:16 GMT, "Paul Stamler"
    <pstamlerhell@pobox.com> wrote:

    >
    >"playon" <playonATcomcast.net> wrote in message
    >news:kfljg0ho0v3qqpaj7ojj3cfjl8bmeth2ga@4ax.com...
    >> On Thu, 29 Jul 2004 14:08:30 -0400, Don Cooper
    >> <dcooper28800@comcast.net> wrote:
    >>
    >> >
    >> >
    >> >Animix wrote:
    >> >
    >> >> Oops........maybe Synclavier? Did they even have Synclavier's back in
    >66?
    >> >
    >> >
    >> >No.
    >>
    >> No Mellotrons either.
    >
    >Yeah, they did. They used them on "Penny Lane", which was recorded in, I
    >believe, the fall of '66. Before that, I think they were used to generate
    >laugh tracks for sitcoms (really).

    Penny Lane was released in '67, maybe recorded in '66, at any rate
    they didn't have one in the states yet.

    Al
  12. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    playon wrote:
    > On Thu, 29 Jul 2004 14:08:30 -0400, Don Cooper
    > <dcooper28800@comcast.net> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>
    >>Animix wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>Oops........maybe Synclavier? Did they even have Synclavier's back in 66?
    >>
    >>
    >>No.
    >
    >
    > No Mellotrons either.

    Are you sure about that? "Days Of Future Passed" came along in 1967.
  13. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    Wow! Lots of interesting concepts.
    My buddy did mention the Uke.

    The idea of the Giutar section with the Vox Mandoguitar sounds
    possible.
    People have mentioned the box set and books. Does either specifically
    address the instrumentation?
    There seems to be a varied idea based on these rec.audio.pro
    responses.


    > > My buddy and I are discussing the stringed instrument that opens up
    > > the Beach Boys classic "Wouldn't It Be Nice".
    > > I think it's a harp. He disagrees.
    > > Any die hard Beach Boys fans know what was used?
    >
    >
    > 'Twas a ukulele.
    >
    > And basically, the intro was a double-time of what was to transpire in
    > the middle part of the song ("maybe iiff we think and wish and hope
    > and pray, it might come true, ....").
    >
    >
    > Not sure if it was a real koa wood uke or not.
    >
    >
    >
    > JF
  14. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    In article <41093D1E.879E2E65@comcast.net>, Don Cooper
    <dcooper28800@comcast.net> writes:

    >Animix wrote:
    >
    >> Oops........maybe Synclavier? Did they even have Synclavier's back in 66?
    >

    I doubt it. One of the coolest things about the album "Pet Sounds" is how Brian
    Wilson got those unique sounds by combining (what I would consider to be)
    improbable instruments such as accordions and tympani etc. He was getting
    sounds that would, in later decades, be accessable mainly via synthesizers.

    Garth~


    "I think the fact that music can come up a wire is a miracle."
    Ed Cherney
  15. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    Paul played a Mellotron on Strawberry Fields Forever :

    Fascinating read about the recording here:

    http://www.columbia.edu/~brennan/beatles/strawberry-fields.html

    <snip>

    "Take 7 is a mixdown from take 6. Take 6 was recorded Nov 29 1966. Lewisohn
    says they started with a rhythm track, i.e. instruments with no vocals. To
    this they added unspecified instrumental overdubs and a vocal track. Take 6
    appears on a bootleg CD, "Unsurpassed Masters" (UM) volume 3, in which we
    hear a mix as follows: LEFT, mellotron (Paul), drums (Ringo), occasional
    guitar (John?), bass (Paul); CENTER, vocal (John); RIGHT, lead guitar
    (George)."

    Regards,

    Doug Joyce
    Animix Productions
    Durango, CO


    "playon" <playonATcomcast.net> wrote in message
    news:kfljg0ho0v3qqpaj7ojj3cfjl8bmeth2ga@4ax.com...
    > On Thu, 29 Jul 2004 14:08:30 -0400, Don Cooper
    > <dcooper28800@comcast.net> wrote:
    >
    > >
    > >
    > >Animix wrote:
    > >
    > >> Oops........maybe Synclavier? Did they even have Synclavier's back in
    66?
    > >
    > >
    > >No.
    >
    > No Mellotrons either.
  16. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    Sounds like a very-out-of-tune Fender Electric 12-string or
    Mandoguitar to me...

    The box set has a great pic of Barney Kessel playing a Gibson Custom
    10-string A-model with F-holes mandolin...
    Cool shot.

    Bruce
  17. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    Sounds like a very-out-of-tune Fender Electric 12-string or
    Mandoguitar to me...

    The box set has a great pic of Barney Kessel playing a Gibson Custom
    10-string A-model with F-holes mandolin...
    Cool shot.

    Bruce
  18. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    "Paul Stamler" <pstamlerhell@pobox.com> wrote in message news:<E_lOc.154099$OB3.86520@bgtnsc05-news.ops.worldnet.att.net>...
    > "playon" <playonATcomcast.net> wrote in message
    > news:kfljg0ho0v3qqpaj7ojj3cfjl8bmeth2ga@4ax.com...
    > > On Thu, 29 Jul 2004 14:08:30 -0400, Don Cooper
    > > <dcooper28800@comcast.net> wrote:
    > >
    > > >
    > > >
    > > >Animix wrote:
    > > >
    > > >> Oops........maybe Synclavier? Did they even have Synclavier's back in
    > 66?
    > > >
    > > >
    > > >No.
    > >
    > > No Mellotrons either.
    >
    > Yeah, they did. They used them on "Penny Lane", which was recorded in, I
    > believe, the fall of '66. Before that, I think they were used to generate
    > laugh tracks for sitcoms (really).
    >
    > Peace,
    > Paul


    It was actually "Strawberry Fields Forever", but we knew what you
    meant. Recorded in November and December of '66. But mellotrons were
    around long before that, as others have pointed out.

    As far as i can recall, a mellotron was used on the "Wild Honey"
    album, but definately not on "Pet Sounds".

    Both mandolins and ukulele were used in the song "Wouldn't It Be
    Nice", and both were listed in the quite large line-up of instruments
    used on that album.

    Folks, it was a uke for the intro. There is no double course
    instrument that can ring that clear. It was a ukulele. The mandolins
    were used as rhythm instruments, e.g., the 'chunka, chunka,...'
    *ritardando* after the middle section, and as the tremelo melody
    during the "you know it seems the more we talk about it..." near the
    end of the song.

    Brian Wilson did use a harp (and harpsichord) on pretty much every
    album since mid-'64,(well OK, mid/late '63 for the harp on "In My
    Room") but i can't hear anywhere else on "Pet Sounds" were a ukulele
    might have been used.

    Then again, with all that bouncing, what do i know?


    JF
  19. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    On Fri, 30 Jul 2004 07:56:11 -0400, Jim Gilliland
    <usemylastname@cheerful.com> wrote:

    >playon wrote:
    >> On Thu, 29 Jul 2004 14:08:30 -0400, Don Cooper
    >> <dcooper28800@comcast.net> wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>
    >>>Animix wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>Oops........maybe Synclavier? Did they even have Synclavier's back in 66?
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>No.
    >>
    >>
    >> No Mellotrons either.
    >
    >Are you sure about that? "Days Of Future Passed" came along in 1967.

    Pretty good history of the origins of the Mellotron here:

    http://www.mellotron.com/history.htm

    d

    Pearce Consulting
    http://www.pearce.uk.com
  20. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    Don Pearce wrote:
    > On Fri, 30 Jul 2004 07:56:11 -0400, Jim Gilliland
    > <usemylastname@cheerful.com> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>playon wrote:
    >>>
    >>>No Mellotrons either.
    >>
    >>Are you sure about that? "Days Of Future Passed" came along in 1967.

    > Pretty good history of the origins of the Mellotron here:
    >
    > http://www.mellotron.com/history.htm

    Interesting stuff - I didn't know that much about the history of the
    instrument. I remember Mike Pinder opening it up for me and showing me
    the internals at a concert here back in the fall of 1968. (WHK
    Ballroom, Cleveland).
  21. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    in article _c-dnY2BrL71qpfcRVn-vw@adelphia.com, Jim Gilliland at
    usemylastname@cheerful.com wrote on 7/30/04 7:56 AM:

    >> No Mellotrons either.
    >
    > Are you sure about that? "Days Of Future Passed" came along in 1967.

    Mellotrons don't work very well for plucked or struck sounds.
    Wouldn't it be Nice was tracked January 1966.

    I agree with Guido - Vox Mandoguitar & Fender electric mandolin.
  22. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    umbriaco wrote:

    > in article _c-dnY2BrL71qpfcRVn-vw@adelphia.com, Jim Gilliland at
    > usemylastname@cheerful.com wrote on 7/30/04 7:56 AM:
    >
    >>>No Mellotrons either.
    >>
    >>Are you sure about that? "Days Of Future Passed" came along in 1967.
    >
    > Mellotrons don't work very well for plucked or struck sounds.
    > Wouldn't it be Nice was tracked January 1966.

    Sorry, I didn't mean to imply that it had been used on "Wouldn't It Be
    Nice". It's pretty obvious that that wasn't a Mellotron. I just
    questioned that it hadn't been around in 1966.
  23. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    > Any die hard Beach Boys fans know what was used?

    If I remember right from the Granata book on Pet Sounds (referred to
    in another post), it's Billy Strange on a "detuned" guitar all by
    himself.
  24. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    garthrr@aol.com (Garth) wrote in message news:<20040730042715.22164.00000083@mb-m05.aol.com>...
    > In article <41093D1E.879E2E65@comcast.net>, Don Cooper
    > <dcooper28800@comcast.net> writes:
    >
    > >Animix wrote:
    > >
    > >> Oops........maybe Synclavier? Did they even have Synclavier's back in 66?
    > >
    >
    > I doubt it. One of the coolest things about the album "Pet Sounds" is how Brian
    > Wilson got those unique sounds by combining (what I would consider to be)
    > improbable instruments such as accordions and tympani etc. He was getting
    > sounds that would, in later decades, be accessable mainly via synthesizers.
    >
    > Garth~


    Thank goodness that Moog synthesizers were so rare in that day. Brian
    Wilson was doing the accoustical version of that long before "Pet
    Sounds".

    He would so often 'ride' something on top of Carol Kaye's Fender bass
    track, e.g. The opening to the song "Dance, Dance, Dance" was actually
    an exception, where the plucked upright bass was incorporated, as
    distinct from the electric bass there.

    But otherwise, he would so often use horns, or bass saxes, or piano,
    or harpsichord, note-for-note, to augment the bass line.

    I used to think that the Beach Boys music had a bigger bass sound just
    because it was louder. I learned later that the double low saxes in
    "She's Not The Little Girl I Once Knew" or the horns also following
    the bass line in "Here Today" on 'Pet Sounds' was such a big part of
    that huge sound. (not to forget the harpsichord, changing the flavor
    of the bass, yet again, near the end of that song)

    I'm not even going to go into how some 20-23 year old who wrote only
    simple popular tunes, with no musical theory training whatsoever,
    could come up with 13'th chord harmony vocals and melodic, non-tonic
    related bass lines.

    It wobbles the mind.


    JF
  25. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    > > Any die hard Beach Boys fans know what was used?
    >
    > If I remember right from the Granata book on Pet Sounds (referred to
    > in another post), it's Billy Strange on a "detuned" guitar all by
    > himself.


    I just went to to Billy's website and left the question at his forum.
    It certainly sounds like a fretted instrument to me. The "detuned"
    guitar seems most likely.
  26. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    I was lucky enough to interview Brian Wilson for the Illinois Entertainer when
    his "Imagination" album came out, and I asked him this very question. He said
    it was two guitars, one of which was a Fender Mustang.

    Matt
  27. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    Onajemvsic1@aol.com (JMS) wrote in message news:<acfc943a.0407310622.34cafaf6@posting.google.com>...
    > > > Any die hard Beach Boys fans know what was vsed?
    > >
    > > If I remember right from the Granata book on Pet Sovnds (referred to
    > > in another post), it's Billy Strange on a "detvned" gvitar all by
    > > himself.
    >
    >
    > I jvst went to to Billy's website and left the qvestion at his forvm.
    > It certainly sovnds like a fretted instrvment to me. The "detvned"
    > gvitar seems most likely.


    Compliments of Carol Kaye via Rvss Wapensky:

    Billy Strange and Jerry Cole on elec. 12-strings, here's Rvss
    Wapensky's email that jvst came in (and he's qvoting from the Local 47
    Recording Contracts which he alone has a data-base on - ovtside of the
    Union)...

    >>>>>Carol,
    It was Billy Strange and Jerry Cole on electric 12s.
    Rvss<<<<
  28. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    Garth wrote:
    > In article <41093D1E.879E2E65@comcast.net>, Don Cooper
    > <dcooper28800@comcast.net> writes:
    >
    >> Animix wrote:
    >>
    >>> Oops........maybe Synclavier? Did they even have Synclavier's back
    >>> in 66?
    >>
    >
    > I doubt it. One of the coolest things about the album "Pet Sounds" is
    > how Brian Wilson got those unique sounds by combining (what I would
    > consider to be) improbable instruments such as accordions and tympani
    > etc. He was getting sounds that would, in later decades, be
    > accessable mainly via synthesizers.


    But did he even know he was doing it ?

    geoff
  29. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    Altasrecrd wrote:
    > I was lucky enough to interview Brian Wilson for the Illinois
    > Entertainer when his "Imagination" album came out, and I asked him
    > this very question. He said it was two guitars, one of which was a
    > Fender Mustang.


    Would he remember - or did that phase come later ?

    geoff
  30. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    In article <cdf5c97b.0407302320.69a9904a@posting.google.com>,
    jflx@earthlink.net says...
    >
    >
    >garthrr@aol.com (Garth) wrote in message
    >news:<20040730042715.22164.00000083@mb-m05.aol.com>...
    >> In article <41093D1E.879E2E65@comcast.net>, Don Cooper
    >> <dcooper28800@comcast.net> writes:
    >>
    >> >Animix wrote:
    >> >
    >> >> Oops........maybe Synclavier? Did they even have Synclavier's back in
    66?
    >> >
    >>
    >> I doubt it. One of the coolest things about the album "Pet Sounds" is how
    Brian
    >> Wilson got those unique sounds by combining (what I would consider to be)
    >> improbable instruments such as accordions and tympani etc. He was getting
    >> sounds that would, in later decades, be accessable mainly via synthesizers.
    >>
    >> Garth~
    >
    >
    >Thank goodness that Moog synthesizers were so rare in that day. Brian
    >Wilson was doing the accoustical version of that long before "Pet
    >Sounds".
    >
    >He would so often 'ride' something on top of Carol Kaye's Fender bass
    >track, e.g. The opening to the song "Dance, Dance, Dance" was actually
    >an exception, where the plucked upright bass was incorporated, as
    >distinct from the electric bass there.
    >
    >But otherwise, he would so often use horns, or bass saxes, or piano,
    >or harpsichord, note-for-note, to augment the bass line.
    >
    >I used to think that the Beach Boys music had a bigger bass sound just
    >because it was louder. I learned later that the double low saxes in
    >"She's Not The Little Girl I Once Knew" or the horns also following
    >the bass line in "Here Today" on 'Pet Sounds' was such a big part of
    >that huge sound. (not to forget the harpsichord, changing the flavor
    >of the bass, yet again, near the end of that song)
    >
    >I'm not even going to go into how some 20-23 year old who wrote only
    >simple popular tunes, with no musical theory training whatsoever,
    >could come up with 13'th chord harmony vocals and melodic, non-tonic
    >related bass lines.
    >
    >It wobbles the mind.

    He had a certain amount of theory training at his high school, IIRC. He was
    also very into The Four Freshmen, and reportedly dissected their
    vocal arrangements as part of his self-imposed musical education. Beach Boys'
    harmonies were very influenced by Four Freshmen harmonies. Bringing chromatic,
    jazz-influenced harmonies into the diatonic world of '60s rock 'n' roll was a
    very radical thing at the time.
  31. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    "Geoff Wood" <geoff@paf.co.nz-nospam> wrote in message
    news:ZzSPc.1597$zS6.195120@news02.tsnz.net...
    > Garth wrote:
    > > In article <41093D1E.879E2E65@comcast.net>, Don Cooper
    > > <dcooper28800@comcast.net> writes:
    > >
    > >> Animix wrote:
    > >>> Oops........maybe Synclavier? Did they even have Synclavier's back
    > >>> in 66?

    NO.

    > > I doubt it

    The Moog modular was the only option AFAIK.

    TonyP.
  32. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    "Geoff Wood" <geoff@paf.co.nz-nospam> wrote in message news:<ZzSPc.1597$zS6.195120@news02.tsnz.net>...
    > Garth wrote:
    > > In article <41093D1E.879E2E65@comcast.net>, Don Cooper
    > > <dcooper28800@comcast.net> writes:
    > >
    > >> Animix wrote:
    > >>
    > >>> Oops........maybe Synclavier? Did they even have Synclavier's back
    > >>> in 66?
    > >>
    > >
    > > I doubt it. One of the coolest things about the album "Pet Sounds" is
    > > how Brian Wilson got those unique sounds by combining (what I would
    > > consider to be) improbable instruments such as accordions and tympani
    > > etc. He was getting sounds that would, in later decades, be
    > > accessable mainly via synthesizers.
    >
    >
    > But did he even know he was doing it ?
    >
    > geoff

    are you joking, geoff? i can't tell if that's a joke based on his
    later SMiLE era breakdown or if you're proposing that he
    compositionally (or chemically) stumbled upon it. :)

    just in case you weren't kidding around, everything i've read and
    heard in both direct quotes by Brian Wilson and people around him at
    the time paint the picture that everything he was doing on Pet Sounds
    was very deliberate.

    of course, the concept wasn't new. he was always sort of trying to
    achieve his own take on the Phil Spector thing, but what he achieved
    was certainly very much Brian Wilson.
  33. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    Robert Orban <donotreply@spamblock.com> wrote in message news:<7cadnes4qqqS1ozcRVn-qQ@giganews.com>...
    > In article <cdf5c97b.0407302320.69a9904a@posting.google.com>,
    > jflx@earthlink.net says...
    > >
    > >
    > >garthrr@aol.com (Garth) wrote in message
    > >news:<20040730042715.22164.00000083@mb-m05.aol.com>...
    > >> In article <41093D1E.879E2E65@comcast.net>, Don Cooper
    > >> <dcooper28800@comcast.net> writes:
    > >>
    > >> >Animix wrote:
    > >> >
    > >> >> Oops........maybe Synclavier? Did they even have Synclavier's back in
    > 66?
    > >> >
    > >>
    > >> I doubt it. One of the coolest things about the album "Pet Sounds" is how
    > Brian
    > >> Wilson got those unique sounds by combining (what I would consider to be)
    > >> improbable instruments such as accordions and tympani etc. He was getting
    > >> sounds that would, in later decades, be accessable mainly via synthesizers.
    > >>
    > >> Garth~
    > >
    > >
    > >Thank goodness that Moog synthesizers were so rare in that day. Brian
    > >Wilson was doing the accoustical version of that long before "Pet
    > >Sounds".
    > >
    > >He would so often 'ride' something on top of Carol Kaye's Fender bass
    > >track, e.g. The opening to the song "Dance, Dance, Dance" was actually
    > >an exception, where the plucked upright bass was incorporated, as
    > >distinct from the electric bass there.
    > >
    > >But otherwise, he would so often use horns, or bass saxes, or piano,
    > >or harpsichord, note-for-note, to augment the bass line.
    > >
    > >I used to think that the Beach Boys music had a bigger bass sound just
    > >because it was louder. I learned later that the double low saxes in
    > >"She's Not The Little Girl I Once Knew" or the horns also following
    > >the bass line in "Here Today" on 'Pet Sounds' was such a big part of
    > >that huge sound. (not to forget the harpsichord, changing the flavor
    > >of the bass, yet again, near the end of that song)
    > >
    > >I'm not even going to go into how some 20-23 year old who wrote only
    > >simple popular tunes, with no musical theory training whatsoever,
    > >could come up with 13'th chord harmony vocals and melodic, non-tonic
    > >related bass lines.
    > >
    > >It wobbles the mind.
    >
    > He had a certain amount of theory training at his high school, IIRC. He was
    > also very into The Four Freshmen, and reportedly dissected their
    > vocal arrangements as part of his self-imposed musical education. Beach Boys'
    > harmonies were very influenced by Four Freshmen harmonies. Bringing chromatic,
    > jazz-influenced harmonies into the diatonic world of '60s rock 'n' roll was a
    > very radical thing at the time.

    his dad was also a songwriter (though not NEARLY as good a one as his
    son, which led to some ugly jealousy and bad treatment/manipulation
    that fed into/created many of Brian's psychological problems) so he
    did grow up around music...
  34. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    Geoff Wood wrote:

    > > One of the coolest things about the album "Pet Sounds" is
    > > how Brian Wilson got those unique sounds by combining (what I would
    > > consider to be) improbable instruments such as accordions and tympani
    > > etc. He was getting sounds that would, in later decades, be
    > > accessable mainly via synthesizers.
    >
    > But did he even know he was doing it ?


    I think he had a vision of the final product early on in the process.
    Again, the "Pet Sounds" Box Set offers a wonderful glimpse into how
    these sessions were conducted.
  35. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    Don Cooper <dcooper28800@comcast.net> writes:
    >I think he had a vision of the final product early on in the process.
    >Again, the "Pet Sounds" Box Set offers a wonderful glimpse into how
    >these sessions were conducted.

    Yeah. It's really something to hear this 20-something prodigy directing
    the veteran LA session cats. He OBVIOUSLY knew what he was after.
  36. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    georgeh wrote:

    > Yeah. It's really something to hear this 20-something prodigy directing
    > the veteran LA session cats. He OBVIOUSLY knew what he was after.


    The conversations through the talkback system are hysterical. He's
    directing guys who are probably twice his age.

    "What did he say? Whadda ya want here, Brian?"
  37. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    Don Cooper wrote:

    > I think he had a vision of the final product early on in the process.
    > Again, the "Pet Sounds" Box Set offers a wonderful glimpse into how
    > these sessions were conducted.

    That doesn't seem to be available any more. Anybody want to
    sell theirs?


    Bob
    --

    "Things should be described as simply as possible, but no
    simpler."

    A. Einstein
  38. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    >From: Bob Cain

    >That doesn't seem to be available any more. Anybody want to
    >sell theirs?

    Not cheap, but...

    from <gemm.com>

    http://www9.gemm.com/c/search.pl?currency=US&field=TITLE&wild=Pet+Sounds+box

    or:

    http://tinyurl.com/3ten3

    Three for sale there. Happy hunting. --TP
  39. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    >From: Bob Cain

    >That doesn't seem to be available any more. Anybody want to
    >sell theirs?

    Perhaps better:

    http://cheap-cds.com/surf/disps/243819

    They have three, $57.91 incl. S&H. I've bought there once or twice, good
    experience. --TP
  40. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    Tom Paterson wrote:

    >>From: Bob Cain
    >
    >
    >>That doesn't seem to be available any more. Anybody want to
    >>sell theirs?
    >
    >
    > Perhaps better:
    >
    > http://cheap-cds.com/surf/disps/243819
    >
    > They have three, $57.91 incl. S&H. I've bought there once or twice, good
    > experience. --TP

    Thanks Tom. I'd only Googled on "pet sounds boxed set" and
    came up dry.


    Bob
    --

    "Things should be described as simply as possible, but no
    simpler."

    A. Einstein
  41. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    As somebody who essentially ignored the Beach Boys (the Beatles used up
    most of my attention span for 60's pop), what would you suggest as the one
    album that either nails the essence of the Beach Boys the best, or is
    simply the best one to listen to?
  42. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    On Fri, 06 Aug 2004 03:59:19 GMT, rdbarone@shaw.ca (Ralph & Diane
    Barone) wrote:

    >As somebody who essentially ignored the Beach Boys (the Beatles used up
    >most of my attention span for 60's pop), what would you suggest as the one
    >album that either nails the essence of the Beach Boys the best, or is
    >simply the best one to listen to?

    There's maybe no such critter, but the one I still play often is
    _Holland_. _Surf's Up_ too. But that's just geezerhood.

    Chris Hornbeck
    "That's the way Stravinsky was. Bup, Bup, Bup, Bup.
    The poor guy's dead now. Play it legato." -Eugene Ormandy
  43. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    On Fri, 06 Aug 2004 04:15:27 GMT, Chris Hornbeck
    <chrishornbeckremovethis@att.net> wrote:

    >On Fri, 06 Aug 2004 03:59:19 GMT, rdbarone@shaw.ca (Ralph & Diane
    >Barone) wrote:
    >
    >>As somebody who essentially ignored the Beach Boys (the Beatles used up
    >>most of my attention span for 60's pop), what would you suggest as the one
    >>album that either nails the essence of the Beach Boys the best, or is
    >>simply the best one to listen to?
    >
    >There's maybe no such critter, but the one I still play often is
    >_Holland_. _Surf's Up_ too. But that's just geezerhood.

    You can't go too wrong with some kind of greatest hits thing either.
    Is "Holland" the live album? There was a live album they did in the
    late 70s or early 80s that was just killer, even though Brian wasn't
    on it.

    Al
  44. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    Chris Hornbeck wrote:
    > On Fri, 06 Aug 2004 03:59:19 GMT, rdbarone@shaw.ca (Ralph & Diane
    > Barone) wrote:
    >
    >>As somebody who essentially ignored the Beach Boys (the Beatles used up
    >>most of my attention span for 60's pop), what would you suggest as the one
    >>album that either nails the essence of the Beach Boys the best, or is
    >>simply the best one to listen to?
    >
    > There's maybe no such critter, but the one I still play often is
    > _Holland_. _Surf's Up_ too. But that's just geezerhood.

    Surf's Up is certainly a masterpiece, but it is in no way representative
    of their "essence". If you want one Beach Boys album that is truly
    representative of them, I'd probably pick "Summer Days (and Summer
    Nights)", which was later combined into a twofer as "All Summer Long".

    But there are a LOT of good compilations of the Beach Boys hits. I
    picked one up a few years ago that I like a lot. It's called "Endless
    Summer", and features most of their major hits from "Surfin' Safari"
    through "Good Vibrations".

    Better still may be a collection called "Sounds of Summer", which
    features 30 of their best known songs from 1962 to 1988. (Curiously, as
    comprehensive as this collection appears, it still misses "The Warmth Of
    The Sun".)
  45. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    >what would you suggest as the one
    >album that either nails the essence of the Beach Boys...

    For something that just stinks of Beach Boy, that live record
    (recorded in Sacramento as I remember??) with al of them (including
    Brian) decked out in matching pinstipe shirts and matching Fender
    guitars and amps on the cover blasting out all the teen hits complete
    with screaming is a pretty cool listen...
  46. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    Ralph & Diane Barone wrote:

    > As somebody who essentially ignored the Beach Boys (the Beatles used up
    > most of my attention span for 60's pop), what would you suggest as the one
    > album that either nails the essence of the Beach Boys the best, or is
    > simply the best one to listen to?


    I have much of their stuff (and all the Beatles'). I'd say "Pet Sounds"
    is the best example of Brian Wilson at his recording / arranging /
    producing peak.
  47. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    playon wrote:

    > You can't go too wrong with some kind of greatest hits thing either.
    > Is "Holland" the live album?

    No. It was a studio album done on a boat in Holland. 8 /


    > There was a live album they did in the
    > late 70s or early 80s that was just killer, even though Brian wasn't
    > on it.


    That was "In Concert".
  48. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    >From: Bob Cain

    >Thanks Tom.

    My pleasure.

    >I'd only Googled on "pet sounds boxed set" and came up dry.

    Well, you could have dried you wallet out by around $175 with the first thing I
    found. Later poster found it for $38 at Amoeba in LA. That's why we like those
    friendly local music stores... (Waterloo here in Austin Tx). "Happy hunting".
  49. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    Tom Paterson wrote:

    >>From: Bob Cain
    >
    >
    >>Thanks Tom.
    >
    >
    > My pleasure.
    >
    >
    >>I'd only Googled on "pet sounds boxed set" and came up dry.
    >
    >
    > Well, you could have dried you wallet out by around $175 with the first thing I
    > found. Later poster found it for $38 at Amoeba in LA. That's why we like those
    > friendly local music stores... (Waterloo here in Austin Tx). "Happy hunting".

    Ordered it and really looking forward. I wasn't much into
    music in this kind of depth back then so it will pretty much
    be a new experience to me. As much as I've heard recently
    about the brilliance of that album I've been wanting to give
    it a listen and when I heard about the boxed set, decided to
    go all the way. :-)


    Bob
    --

    "Things should be described as simply as possible, but no
    simpler."

    A. Einstein
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