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Turning Ethernet into wireless

Last response: in Networking
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August 1, 2012 4:25:28 PM

Currently I have a Modem/Router downstairs with 2 Laptops connected wirelessly and then I have an Ethernet cable running upstairs to connect my desktop PC to the router as there is no signal in my room.

I would now like to connect another wired device in my room and various phones and tablets wirelessly. As there is no signal in my room and the only way to get internet in my room is via Ethernet cable (powerline networking isn't ideal as plugs are a shortage) I would like to know if there is some sort of switch with WiFi I can get to achieve wireless in my room.

Any help is much appreciated.
August 1, 2012 4:45:39 PM

If you’re happy/content with continuing to run an ethernet cable between the floors, you can just connect another wireless router. You just need to reconfigure it as a wireless AP (assign it a static IP in the same network as the primary router, connect it LAN to LAN, and disable its DHCP server).

If you’d rather eliminate that ethernet cable between the floors, you need a wireless repeater w/ integrated switch. The repeater connects to your primary router as a wireless client, while simultaneously establishing its own AP for nearby wireless clients. The integrated switch obviously gives nearby wired clients similar access.

You can create your own wireless repeater using any wireless router and adding a wireless ethernet bridge. The wireless ethernet bridge acts as the wireless client, while the wireless router provides the AP and switch.
August 1, 2012 4:51:29 PM

eibgrad said:
If you’re happy/content with continuing to run an ethernet cable between the floors, you can just connect another wireless router. You just need to reconfigure it as a wireless AP (assign it a static IP in the same network as the primary routert, connect it LAN to LAN, and disable its DHCP server).

If you’d rather eliminate that ethernet cable between the floors, you need a wireless repeater w/ integrated switch. The repeater connects to your primary router as a wireless client, while simultaneously establishing its own AP for nearby wireless clients. The integrated switch obviously gives nearby wired clients similar access.

You can create your own wireless repeater using any wireless router and adding a wireless ethernet bridge. The wireless ethernet bridge acts as the wireless client, while the wireless router provides the AP and switch.



I'm perfectly happy leaving the Ethernet cable in place.

How would I go about setting up a router as a wireless AP? Also would I be buying a router that is for BT connections or Cable ones?

Thanks for the help :) 
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August 1, 2012 5:03:24 PM

You’re not using this second wireless router because of its routing capabilities, but only because it happens to have the two thing you need; a wireless AP and switch. The routing feature (which relates to BT, cable, etc.) is not used and therefore irrelevant. In short, use whatever you want or happen to have available.

To turn any wireless router into a switched AP, you assign it a static IP in the same network as the primary router (so if the primary router is say 192.168.1.1, perhaps it make it 192.168.1.2, just as long as it’s not being used by the primary router’s DHCP server), disable its DHCP server, and connect the two routers LAN to LAN.






August 1, 2012 5:08:46 PM

eibgrad said:
You’re not using this second wireless router because of its routing capabilities, but only because it happens to have the two thing you need; a wireless AP and switch. The routing feature (which relates to BT, cable, etc.) is not used and therefore irrelevant. In short, use whatever you want or happen to have available.

To turn any wireless router into a switched AP, you assign it a static IP in the same network as the primary router (so if the primary router is say 192.168.1.1, perhaps it make it 192.168.1.2, just as long as it’s not being used by the primary router’s DHCP server), disable its DHCP server, and connect the two routers LAN to LAN.


Thanks so much! I'll go out and get a cheep router to have a play with then.

I'll let you know when I get it working although I'm going on holiday for 3 weeks in a couple of days so I might not report back for a while!
August 1, 2012 5:27:28 PM

P.S. I hope it's obvious, but just in case it's not, it's best if the two wireless routers use different channels. Also, if you use the same SSID and wireless security settings on each, you'll create a roaming configuration. IOW, you’ll configure your devices once, and they’ll automatically select the AP w/ the strongest signal, rather than having to manually switch between the APs. Not a big concern for fixed devices, but handy for portable ones.
August 21, 2012 8:59:53 PM

Thanks so much for all your help, I've got it set up and working. The router I bought even had an option to use it as a wireless AP so i just had to assign it a static address and all is good.

I was just wondering if there was any way to find out which router I'm connected to? Just out of curiosity rather than a need to know.

Thanks,


Ross
August 21, 2012 9:24:34 PM

I assume you're using the same SSID on both APs for roaming purposes. If you bring up the administrative UI of either AP, there’s usually a screen somewhere that shows connected clients, usually by their MAC address, sometimes even by name if you connected recently. Just look for your MAC address (or computer name) on that AP.

And in case you don’t know how to find your MAC address, from any DOS prompt, type “getmac” (no quotes) and hit enter.
August 21, 2012 9:42:56 PM

Thanks but the new router's settings page doesn't have an "attached devices" or whatever section, although I have just realised that I'd just have to check the old one, and if it's not there it must be connected to the new one :) 

Thank you so much for all your help, it's much appreciated.

P.S. Is there any way to give reputation or praise on this site?
August 21, 2012 9:50:25 PM

Sort of, if you close the thread as solved and credit someone, they too are credited.
August 21, 2012 9:57:28 PM

I've opened it as a discussion rather than a question so I cannot select the best answer. Sorry, but I am very grateful of your help :) 
!