Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Difference between 568A and 568B wiring for network

Last response: in Networking
Share
August 4, 2012 3:43:34 AM

Hello,
Does anyone have a link they can recommend for me to learn the difference between 568A wiring and 568B? I am visual and if I can see a diagram, it would help me a lot.

Thanks in advance
August 4, 2012 4:46:28 AM

Electrically, they are the same, the yellow and green pairs are simply reversed. I learned to use T568B, but it does not matter as long as you use the same standard on both ends of a single cable.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TIA/EIA-568
August 14, 2012 12:07:41 AM

PhilFrisbie said:
Electrically, they are the same, the yellow and green pairs are simply reversed. I learned to use T568B, but it does not matter as long as you use the same standard on both ends of a single cable.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TIA/EIA-568



I' still confused because it says that 'pairs 2 and 3 are switched' but it looks like to me that 1 and 6 are switched also.

But thank you for taking the time to help.
Related resources
Can't find your answer ? Ask !
August 14, 2012 12:11:25 PM

Be very careful with the terminology. In one case you are looking at PAIRS and the other you are look at PINS.

This type of information is getting more and more irrelevant. Most this was done when you worried about crossover or straight cables. Most newer technology has the ability to automatically detect and use whatever cable you have.
August 14, 2012 12:52:18 PM

I use T568B for all my cabling.
August 14, 2012 5:41:23 PM

geeky_girl said:
I' still confused because it says that 'pairs 2 and 3 are switched' but it looks like to me that 1 and 6 are switched also.

But thank you for taking the time to help.


you're using the word "pairs" to refer to the pins. There are eight pins, but only four *pairs of pins (or pairs of wires)*, so "pair 6" doesn't exist.

In 568 A:
Pair 1: pins 4, 5 (blue/white, solid blue)
Pair 2: pins 3, 6 (orange/white, solid orange)
Pair 3: pins 1, 2 (Green/white, solid green)
Pair 4: pins 7, 8 (brown/white, solid brown)
August 21, 2012 2:04:40 AM

bill001g said:
Be very careful with the terminology. In one case you are looking at PAIRS and the other you are look at PINS.

This type of information is getting more and more irrelevant. Most this was done when you worried about crossover or straight cables. Most newer technology has the ability to automatically detect and use whatever cable you have.


I know you are right, but I am studying to take my Network+ test next week, and I just wanted to make sure I understood it correctly.
August 21, 2012 2:22:12 AM

quilciri said:
you're using the word "pairs" to refer to the pins. There are eight pins, but only four *pairs of pins (or pairs of wires)*, so "pair 6" doesn't exist.

In 568 A:
Pair 1: pins 4, 5 (blue/white, solid blue)
Pair 2: pins 3, 6 (orange/white, solid orange)
Pair 3: pins 1, 2 (Green/white, solid green)
Pair 4: pins 7, 8 (brown/white, solid brown)



Yes, I was referring to pins, instead of pairs. It is actually easier for me to memorize it if I refer to pins instead of pairs. And so the difference between 568A and B is -- pins 1 and 3 are reversed, and pins 2 and 6?

From what I understand most installations use 568B but it doesn't really matter as long as you have the same thing on both ends of the cable?
August 21, 2012 11:37:32 AM

geeky_girl said:
From what I understand most installations use 568B but it doesn't really matter as long as you have the same thing on both ends of the cable?


True, but once you start wiring a site with one, it's customary to wire the entire site the same way. Don't mix and match as this can cause confusion down the road.
August 21, 2012 4:00:43 PM

Hawkeye22 said:
True, but once you start wiring a site with one, it's customary to wire the entire site the same way. Don't mix and match as this can cause confusion down the road.


That sounds like good advice!
August 21, 2012 6:55:39 PM

geeky_girl said:
And so the difference between 568A and B is -- pins 1 and 3 are reversed, and pins 2 and 6?


That is correct, pins 1 & 3 switch with each other, as do 2 & 6.

For purposes of the test however, any aspect of 568A/B can be used in a question. That means the test can ask you a question based on pairs, pins, or even colors.

good luck!
!