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How do I confirm I have PC2700 and not PC2100?

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July 16, 2002 5:16:59 PM

I just bought two PC2700 512MB DDR SDRAM from two different sellers on Ebay. How do I make sure that I have PC2700 and not PC2100 SDRAM? There is no marking on the chip to indicate one way or the other.

---Hello? Tech Support? I think the reractable coffee cup holder on my computer is broken.

More about : confirm pc2700 pc2100

July 16, 2002 7:18:25 PM

try sandra it identifies module speeds and gives other info.


"A very popular error: having the courage of one's convictions" - Nietzsche
July 16, 2002 7:34:57 PM

I am assuming you are referring to Sandra Standard by 3b Software. Unfortunately their download site is down. I guess I will have to try later.

Thanks for the info.


---Hello? Tech Support? I think the reractable coffee cup holder on my computer is broken.
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July 16, 2002 8:38:46 PM

Look at the individual DRAM chips on the DIMMS.

If the last code number ends with "-75" this means 75 ns which corresponds to 133mhz, PC2100.

If the code is "-6" this translates to 6 ns, 166mhz, PC2700.

A smaller code number means even faster DRAMS.

Some PC2700 memory was overclocked. That is, slower rated DRAMs were used. If the speed code is larger than 6 ns then the DRAMS have to be overclocked to reach PC2700 speed, 166 mhz.

<b>I have so many cookies I now have a FAT problem!</b>
July 16, 2002 10:08:51 PM

On one DDR chip, the number is ending with -7. I guess that means PC2400?

The other DDR chip has heatsink glued on, so I can't even see the individual dram.

Since I am not an overclocker, I am little confused. I thought the over-clocking memory is done on the motherboard and not directly on the memory, no? So when I get hold of Sandra program and if it says they are PC-2700, then it would be OK?

I just bought ASUS A7V333 motherboard for these ddr's.

Thanks again for all your help.




---Hello? Tech Support? I think the reractable coffee cup holder on my computer is broken.
July 16, 2002 10:26:07 PM

Quote:
On one DDR chip, the number is ending with -7. I guess that means PC2400?

Actually, "-7" means it's 7ns DRAMs, spec'd for 142 mhz operation. Ideally, PC2400 (150mhz) memory would have 6.5 ns DRAMs, good to 153 mhz.
Quote:
Since I am not an overclocker, I am little confused. I thought the over-clocking memory is done on the motherboard and not directly on the memory, no? So when I get hold of Sandra program and if it says they are PC-2700, then it would be OK?

I guess it depends on your definition of overclocking. To me this means running a component, any component, above its recommended or specified speed. For memory, the manufacturer may certify the module as a PC2700 module (166 mhz) but if the individual chips (7 ns) are spec'd to run 142 mhz but the module needs to run 150 to reach its rated speed then I call this "overclocked".

I hope this makes my meaning a little clearer.

<b>I have so many cookies I now have a FAT problem!</b>
!