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Demo software expired PC Question?

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Last response: in Home Audio
Anonymous
August 9, 2004 8:01:46 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

I downloaded the Drumagog demo awhile ago. I think it was fully functional for
a few days.
Never really used it because I hadn't a clue so I removed it. I downloaded the
demo again yesterday & it said "demo expired". This has happened with several
apps. I guess it's a PC registry thing? I haven't a clue. When I was Mac guy I
think I remember being able to get rid of extensions & all that & being able to
start fresh.

Is there a way to do this on a PC?I realize this is not exclusive to RAP &
should probably be asked on a XP newsgroup but maybe you know...

More about : demo software expired question

Anonymous
August 9, 2004 8:01:47 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <20040809120146.16791.00002451@mb-m20.aol.com> mondoslug1@aol.comwaht writes:

> I downloaded the Drumagog demo awhile ago. I think it was fully functional for
> a few days.
> Never really used it because I hadn't a clue so I removed it. I downloaded the
> demo again yesterday & it said "demo expired". This has happened with several
> apps. I guess it's a PC registry thing?

I guess so, and because people like you and me are smart enough to
guess that, they do a good job of hiding it. I experienced the same
thing with the Samplitude demo and could find no reference to any
recognizable program or manufacturer name in the registry, but I'm
sure it's in there someplace.

The way to get around it is to make a copy of the registry before you
install the software. Then, when you want to re-install it, load that
copy of the registry, which won't know that you've previously
installed the program.

Of course they could also put a file on the disk somewhere that it
knows to look for.

THey're on to your tricks. <G>


--
I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
Anonymous
August 9, 2004 11:15:02 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On 09 Aug 2004 16:01:46 GMT, mondoslug1@aol.comwaht (Mondoslug1)
wrote:

>I downloaded the Drumagog demo awhile ago. I think it was fully functional for
>a few days.
>Never really used it because I hadn't a clue so I removed it. I downloaded the
>demo again yesterday & it said "demo expired". This has happened with several
>apps. I guess it's a PC registry thing? I haven't a clue. When I was Mac guy I
>think I remember being able to get rid of extensions & all that & being able to
>start fresh.
>
>Is there a way to do this on a PC?I realize this is not exclusive to RAP &
>should probably be asked on a XP newsgroup but maybe you know...

Depending on the ingenuity of the Drumagog programmers, it could be as
simple as a clearly labeled Registry key (search for the program name,
or the company name). Or it could be a cunningly-hidden Registry
key. (There are utility programs that are quite good at finding
simply-hidden ones.) Or it could be a small hidden file in an
unlikely corner of your computer. Or maybe something even more
ingenious. Have fun looking :-)

CubaseFAQ www.laurencepayne.co.uk/CubaseFAQ.htm
"Possibly the world's least impressive web site": George Perfect
Related resources
Anonymous
August 10, 2004 3:28:42 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

...or simply contact the authors and ask them to extend your demo period..
which is so much easier and ethical.

Rail
--
Recording Engineer/Software Developer
Rail Jon Rogut Software
http://www.railjonrogut.com
mailto:rail@railjonrogut.com

"Mike Rivers" <mrivers@d-and-d.com> wrote in message
news:znr1092072496k@trad...
>
> In article <20040809120146.16791.00002451@mb-m20.aol.com>
mondoslug1@aol.comwaht writes:
>
> > I downloaded the Drumagog demo awhile ago. I think it was fully
functional for
> > a few days.
> > Never really used it because I hadn't a clue so I removed it. I
downloaded the
> > demo again yesterday & it said "demo expired". This has happened with
several
> > apps. I guess it's a PC registry thing?
>
> I guess so, and because people like you and me are smart enough to
> guess that, they do a good job of hiding it. I experienced the same
> thing with the Samplitude demo and could find no reference to any
> recognizable program or manufacturer name in the registry, but I'm
> sure it's in there someplace.
>
> The way to get around it is to make a copy of the registry before you
> install the software. Then, when you want to re-install it, load that
> copy of the registry, which won't know that you've previously
> installed the program.
>
> Of course they could also put a file on the disk somewhere that it
> knows to look for.
>
> THey're on to your tricks. <G>
>
>
> --
> I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
> However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
> lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
> you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
> and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
Anonymous
August 10, 2004 5:33:27 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Mike Rivers wrote:
> I guess so, and because people like you and me are smart enough to
> guess that, they do a good job of hiding it. I experienced the same
> thing with the Samplitude demo and could find no reference to any
> recognizable program or manufacturer name in the registry, but I'm
> sure it's in there someplace.

I don't use Windows much, but it seems like a really, really natural
tool to have would a registry "diff" tool. So, you'd snapshot the
registry, then install the software, then snapshot the registry again,
and then diff the two snapshots. The diff would show you the keys
that were added, removed, and modified.

Failing that, hopefully there is some tool out there to dump the
registry to a text file, and then you could "diff" the two text
files and see what has changed.

- Logan
Anonymous
August 10, 2004 11:44:04 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <KMTRc.14952$9Y6.660@newsread1.news.pas.earthlink.net> railro@earthlink.net writes:

> ..or simply contact the authors and ask them to extend your demo period..
> which is so much easier and ethical.

The usual easy and ethical thing to do is pay them some money. They'll
extend your demo period until they go out of business. <g>



--
I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
Anonymous
August 10, 2004 2:35:05 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Rail Jon Rogut wrote:

>..or simply contact the authors and ask them to extend your demo period..
>which is so much easier and ethical.

Uh huh. Here's their reply.
Thanks for the lesson in ethics.

"The only thing that can be done is to install it on another PC, or reinstall
Windows>
Anonymous
August 10, 2004 3:10:38 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <HBVRc.9674$KZ2.560@fe2.texas.rr.com> lshaw-usenet@austin.rr.com writes:

> I don't use Windows much, but it seems like a really, really natural
> tool to have would a registry "diff" tool. So, you'd snapshot the
> registry, then install the software, then snapshot the registry again,
> and then diff the two snapshots. The diff would show you the keys
> that were added, removed, and modified.

I remember an installer program (pre-registry) that did something like
that. It kept an inventory of your disk and told you want was added
and if any existing files were modified. I wouldn't be surprised if
there wasn't something like that for the registry now.

The registry can get awfully big, though. I played with one of those
"registry fixer" programs once and found that there was close to
100,000 entries in my registry. It did identify some well enough to
recognize as being related to programs that I was no longer using, so
I felt safe in deleting them. A great many were multiple entries for
files that I had downloaded. I deleted those, too. But still, after a
few hours spread out over about a week of playing with it, the
registry was still huge. I really think it's hopeless to keep up with
this without daily maintenance.


--
I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
Anonymous
August 10, 2004 3:10:39 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Mike Rivers wrote:

> In article <HBVRc.9674$KZ2.560@fe2.texas.rr.com> lshaw-usenet@austin.rr.com writes:
>
>
>> I don't use Windows much, but it seems like a really, really natural
>> tool to have would a registry "diff" tool. So, you'd snapshot the
>> registry, then install the software, then snapshot the registry again,
>> and then diff the two snapshots. The diff would show you the keys
>> that were added, removed, and modified.
>
>
> I remember an installer program (pre-registry) that did something like
> that. It kept an inventory of your disk and told you want was added
> and if any existing files were modified. I wouldn't be surprised if
> there wasn't something like that for the registry now.
>
> The registry can get awfully big, though. I played with one of those
> "registry fixer" programs once and found that there was close to
> 100,000 entries in my registry. It did identify some well enough to
> recognize as being related to programs that I was no longer using, so
> I felt safe in deleting them. A great many were multiple entries for
> files that I had downloaded. I deleted those, too. But still, after a
> few hours spread out over about a week of playing with it, the
> registry was still huge. I really think it's hopeless to keep up with
> this without daily maintenance.

Windows machines are pretty much hopeless at cruft accumulation. After 15 years of working with them, hundreds at this point, I just format the hard drive and start over every couple of years.
Anonymous
August 10, 2004 4:13:21 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

mondoslug1@aol.comwaht (Mondoslug1) wrote in message news:<20040809120146.16791.00002451@mb-m20.aol.com>...
> I downloaded the Drumagog demo awhile ago. I think it was fully functional for
> a few days.
> Never really used it because I hadn't a clue so I removed it. I downloaded the
> demo again yesterday & it said "demo expired". This has happened with several
> apps. I guess it's a PC registry thing? I haven't a clue. When I was Mac guy I
> think I remember being able to get rid of extensions & all that & being able to
> start fresh.
>
> Is there a way to do this on a PC?I realize this is not exclusive to RAP &
> should probably be asked on a XP newsgroup but maybe you know...

It's probably a little late for you now, but if you are running Win XP
you can make a "restore point" before you install a piece of software
or otherwise modify the registry.
Then you can use the "system restore" function to return to your
system settings as they were at that point.

Even though you've already installed your demo, the system does take
automatic restore points at various times. You might check, maybe
there is a restore point that would work for you.
Click Start, Help & Support, them select the system Restore task.

Hope this helps..

See.Kneel
Anonymous
August 10, 2004 7:50:05 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

InCtrl5

http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,1759,25198,00.asp


Frank /~ http://newmex.com/f10
@/





On 10 Aug 2004 11:10:38 -0400, mrivers@d-and-d.com (Mike Rivers)
wrote:

>
>In article <HBVRc.9674$KZ2.560@fe2.texas.rr.com> lshaw-usenet@austin.rr.com writes:
>
>> I don't use Windows much, but it seems like a really, really natural
>> tool to have would a registry "diff" tool. So, you'd snapshot the
>> registry, then install the software, then snapshot the registry again,
>> and then diff the two snapshots. The diff would show you the keys
>> that were added, removed, and modified.
>
>I remember an installer program (pre-registry) that did something like
>that. It kept an inventory of your disk and told you want was added
>and if any existing files were modified. I wouldn't be surprised if
>there wasn't something like that for the registry now.
>
>The registry can get awfully big, though. I played with one of those
>"registry fixer" programs once and found that there was close to
>100,000 entries in my registry. It did identify some well enough to
>recognize as being related to programs that I was no longer using, so
>I felt safe in deleting them. A great many were multiple entries for
>files that I had downloaded. I deleted those, too. But still, after a
>few hours spread out over about a week of playing with it, the
>registry was still huge. I really think it's hopeless to keep up with
>this without daily maintenance.
August 10, 2004 9:55:48 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Kurt Albershardt wrote:

> Windows machines are pretty much hopeless at cruft accumulation. After 15
> years of working with them, hundreds at this point, I just format the hard
> drive and start over every couple of years.


This is the single most important key to minimizing problems if you
absolutely have to use winblows.
Anonymous
August 10, 2004 10:19:57 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On 10 Aug 2004 10:35:05 GMT, mondoslug1@aol.comwaht (Mondoslug1)
wrote:

>>..or simply contact the authors and ask them to extend your demo period..
>>which is so much easier and ethical.
>
>Uh huh. Here's their reply.
>Thanks for the lesson in ethics.
>
> "The only thing that can be done is to install it on another PC, or reinstall
>Windows>

Which means they're not telling you, not that there isn't an answer
:-)

is this Windows XP? have you tried a System Restore?

CubaseFAQ www.laurencepayne.co.uk/CubaseFAQ.htm
"Possibly the world's least impressive web site": George Perfect
August 10, 2004 10:38:09 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Mondoslug1 wrote:

> I downloaded the Drumagog demo awhile ago. I think it was fully functional
> for a few days.
> Never really used it because I hadn't a clue so I removed it. I downloaded
> the demo again yesterday & it said "demo expired". This has happened with
> several apps. I guess it's a PC registry thing? I haven't a clue. When I
> was Mac guy I think I remember being able to get rid of extensions & all
> that & being able to start fresh.
>
> Is there a way to do this on a PC?I realize this is not exclusive to RAP &
> should probably be asked on a XP newsgroup but maybe you know...


In the Unix (& windows NT) server world there are security tools like
Tripwire (for example) which monitor your system for ANY change. I'm sure
something similar exists for PCs. Just get out there on the net & find it.

Of course, that doesn't help you now. But for future reference, these
tools will tell you EVERYTHING that an install program does to your system,
so YOU can do a COMPLETE uninstall.

You may well have to wipe everything clean & reinstall to make the trial
version work on your system. That's not what you wanted to hear, but if
you REALLY MUST run inportant stuff on a winblows PC, it's a smart policy
to do a real scorched earth system cleanup (including reinstalling windows)
every couple of years anyway.

If all else fails. AND if you are proficient in C and/or C++ programming
languages (or have a friend who is), AND at least capable of reading
assembler instructions, then there are tools available that will let you
see just what the program is looking for when it checks for expiration.
These are legitimate software development tools, not hacker tools, as some
would have you believe, but even a pistol can be used for good or evil.
Search Google & Yahoo for debuggers & decompilers. Microsoft Visuall C++
includes a pretty decent debugger, but it's kind of expensive. But that's
probably more of a hassle than just wiping everything & reinstalling,
unless you just happen to enjoy that kind of thing. (I used to enjoy that
kind of thing, but then they started paying me for it & it kind of took all
the fun out of it.)

What's going to be really fun to watch is how many people who supported the
RIAA's position in suing 12 year olds for downloading copyrighted music are
going to try to help you crack this copyrighted software.
Is what's good for the goose REALLY good for the gander?
Anonymous
August 11, 2004 12:07:14 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Mondoslug1" <mondoslug1@aol.comwaht> wrote in message
news:20040809120146.16791.00002451@mb-m20.aol.com...
> I downloaded the Drumagog demo awhile ago. I think it was fully functional
for
> a few days.
> Never really used it because I hadn't a clue so I removed it. I downloaded
the
> demo again yesterday & it said "demo expired". This has happened with
several
> apps. I guess it's a PC registry thing? I haven't a clue. When I was Mac
guy I
> think I remember being able to get rid of extensions & all that & being
able to
> start fresh.
>
> Is there a way to do this on a PC?I realize this is not exclusive to RAP &
> should probably be asked on a XP newsgroup but maybe you know...

Find an uninstaller program that'll take snapshots of your system.
Reinstall the program. Then, look at the install log entries via the
uninstaller program and look at what all was installed in the registry and
on the drive(files.) Then, manually check to see if any of those are still
laying around.

The Windows Restore function is rather iffy and can't be trusted to really
turn your computer back completely, as I've noticed it doesn't reverse
registry entries in some cases, and it also leaves files laying around after
the fact sometimes, which would be counterproductive to your goals here.
Also, if it's been awhile since you installed that program, Windows Restore
might turn your system back so far that others programs then require
reinstalling to work, since it may turn your system back to a point before
you installed certain programs that would normally require an install to
function(dll's and such that might need registering.)

Hope that helps.
Anonymous
August 11, 2004 2:02:10 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <f1dd96e0.0408101113.297dd2d4@posting.google.com> cneill@socal.rr.com writes:

> It's probably a little late for you now, but if you are running Win XP
> you can make a "restore point" before you install a piece of software
> or otherwise modify the registry.
> Then you can use the "system restore" function to return to your
> system settings as they were at that point.

That's fine if you don't install anything else before you want to go
back to your restore point. But if you've installed a few programs
(and people who download stuff off the Internet to try usually install
a lot of programs) it will lose whatever else you've installed since
the restore point.


--
I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
Anonymous
August 11, 2004 2:47:10 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

agent86 wrote:
> Mondoslug1 wrote:
>
>
>>I downloaded the Drumagog demo awhile ago. I think it was fully functional
>>for a few days.
>>Never really used it because I hadn't a clue so I removed it. I downloaded
>>the demo again yesterday & it said "demo expired". This has happened with

> What's going to be really fun to watch is how many people who supported the
> RIAA's position in suing 12 year olds for downloading copyrighted music are
> going to try to help you crack this copyrighted software.
> Is what's good for the goose REALLY good for the gander?
>

What's even funnier, IMHO, is the same software company will scream loud
and clear if someone cracks and therefore steals their software but they
have no compunction about stealing the physical space that their
resident code uses on the hardrive, and/or CPU time, after the expiry
date and said demo software has been removed by the computer owner.
Again IMHO, **all** files relating to the demo software should be
removed by a fully functioning uninstall program provide by the demo
software company. YMMV.......:-)
Anonymous
August 11, 2004 3:21:25 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Lawrence Lucier wrote:
> What's even funnier, IMHO, is the same software company will scream loud
> and clear if someone cracks and therefore steals their software but they
> have no compunction about stealing the physical space that their
> resident code uses on the hardrive, and/or CPU time, after the expiry
> date and said demo software has been removed by the computer owner.
> Again IMHO, **all** files relating to the demo software should be
> removed by a fully functioning uninstall program provide by the demo
> software company. YMMV.......:-)

Here's a crazy thought that doesn't seem to have occurred to the
Windows world: it's a conflict of interests for the install program
to be provided by the software vendor in the first place! In the
ideal world, when you install some software on your machine, the
software installer tool that comes with the OS reads some description
of what needs to be installed where, and this tool does all the
actual installation (copying of files, setting registry keys, etc.).
In other words, the third-party software would have no ability to
install files or anything else without it being tracked. Then,
there is no way to NOT have a complete uninstall because everything
is by definition tracked.

If you hire a new employee at a business, you don't say, "Grab
whatever office you like, and here's the key to the supply closet,
and here are the passwords to all the accounts on all the computers,
now use only what you need." Instead, you assign them an office
and give them an account, and you track what you've given them,
so that when they're gone, you can use it for somebody else, etc.

Unfortunately, such a system doesn't even totally exist outside
the Windows world. There are some good approximations to it.
Java has some security framework built in that manages privileges
for third-party software, so that for example games can only
read files related to themselves. System V Unix has a nice
facility for installing software where the software *can*
request to execute code during the install, but if it does,
the installer (which is part of the OS and not the software
being installed) asks your approval before it does so. Maybe
one day a more complete system will exist.

- Logan
Anonymous
August 11, 2004 4:57:28 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"see.kneel" <cneill@socal.rr.com> wrote in message
news:f1dd96e0.0408101113.297dd2d4@posting.google.com...

> Then you can use the "system restore" function to return to your
> system settings as they were at that point.
>
> Even though you've already installed your demo, the system does take
> automatic restore points at various times. You might check, maybe
> there is a restore point that would work for you.

Important additon: You loose everything you have installed or confugured
after that restore point.

/Preben Friis
Anonymous
August 11, 2004 7:55:22 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

cneill wrote:

>mondoslug1@aol.comwaht (Mondoslug1) wrote in message
>news:<20040809120146.16791.00002451@mb-m20.aol.com>...
>> I downloaded the Drumagog demo awhile ago. I think it was fully functional
>for
>> a few days.
>> Never really used it because I hadn't a clue so I removed it. I downloaded
>the
>> demo again yesterday & it said "demo expired". This has happened with
>several
>> apps. I guess it's a PC registry thing? I haven't a clue. When I was Mac
>guy I
>> think I remember being able to get rid of extensions & all that & being
>able to
>> start fresh.
>>
>> Is there a way to do this on a PC?I realize this is not exclusive to RAP &
>> should probably be asked on a XP newsgroup but maybe you know...
>
>It's probably a little late for you now, but if you are running Win XP
>you can make a "restore point" before you install a piece of software
>or otherwise modify the registry.
>Then you can use the "system restore" function to return to your
>system settings as they were at that point.
>
>Even though you've already installed your demo, the system does take
>automatic restore points at various times. You might check, maybe
>there is a restore point that would work for you.

I had considered that - might still try it.

>Click Start, Help & Support, them select the system Restore task.
>
>Hope this helps..
>
> See.Kneel
>
>
>
>
>
>





Me at:
http://www.soundclick.com/bands/5/andymostmusic.htm
Anonymous
August 11, 2004 7:56:12 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

>
>"see.kneel" <cneill@socal.rr.com> wrote in message
>news:f1dd96e0.0408101113.297dd2d4@posting.google.com...
>
>> Then you can use the "system restore" function to return to your
>> system settings as they were at that point.
>>
>> Even though you've already installed your demo, the system does take
>> automatic restore points at various times. You might check, maybe
>> there is a restore point that would work for you.
>
>Important additon: You loose everything you have installed or confugured
>after that restore point.
>

Yeah, the thought of that is what was holding me back from trying it.


>/Preben Friis
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
Anonymous
August 12, 2004 6:36:25 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On 11 Aug 2004 03:56:12 GMT, mondoslug1@aol.comwaht (Mondoslug1)
wrote:

>>> Then you can use the "system restore" function to return to your
>>> system settings as they were at that point.
>>>
>>> Even though you've already installed your demo, the system does take
>>> automatic restore points at various times. You might check, maybe
>>> there is a restore point that would work for you.
>>
>>Important additon: You loose everything you have installed or confugured
>>after that restore point.
>>
>
>Yeah, the thought of that is what was holding me back from trying it.


Try it. It's reversible.

CubaseFAQ www.laurencepayne.co.uk/CubaseFAQ.htm
"Possibly the world's least impressive web site": George Perfect
Anonymous
August 13, 2004 4:35:50 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Mondoslug1 wrote:
> Rail Jon Rogut wrote:
>
>> ..or simply contact the authors and ask them to extend your demo
>> period.. which is so much easier and ethical.
>
> Uh huh. Here's their reply.
> Thanks for the lesson in ethics.
>
> "The only thing that can be done is to install it on another PC, or
> reinstall Windows>

OK, so they are liars. Why not just say "We won't tell you how" ?

geoff
Anonymous
August 13, 2004 4:35:51 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <VuJSc.2974$zS6.351957@news02.tsnz.net> geoff@paf.co.nz-nospam writes:

> > "The only thing that can be done is to install it on another PC, or
> > reinstall Windows>
>
> OK, so they are liars. Why not just say "We won't tell you how" ?

They probalby don't really know how, but "It's a limited demo and you
should have understood the conditions before you loaded it. If you
could run it whenever you wanted then it wouldn't be a demo." would
certainly be an appropriate answer.

"Piss off, cheapskate!" might be going a little far afield for good
customer relations, even though you're not a customer.


--
I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
Anonymous
August 13, 2004 4:43:27 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

agent86 wrote:
> Kurt Albershardt wrote:
>
>> Windows machines are pretty much hopeless at cruft accumulation.
>> After 15 years of working with them, hundreds at this point, I just
>> format the hard drive and start over every couple of years.
>
>
> This is the single most important key to minimizing problems if you
> absolutely have to use winblows.

Norton WinDoctor and a variety of other apps will chuck out the crud for
you.

geoff