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Need a solution for multiple gateways

Last response: in Networking
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August 14, 2012 11:30:42 PM

Hello I'm SpaceSir, got a question.

I have a server with two adapters: 192.168.1.200 and 10.99.1.200

10.99.1.200 connects to a cisco router 10.99.1.254 (which I have no access to). This connects via WAN to another network to transfer files to another company.

192.168.1.200 is connected to our local LAN.

I have a service that uses FTP to get and send files to a server through 10.99.1.200.

I recently had to switch our IP scheme from 10.99 to 192.168 and since then haven't been able to send files to the ftp server.

My question is, would a router solve my problem? If so, would I; remove the 10.99 adapter, connect 192.168 to the router, connect the router to the switch, connect the 10.99 gateway to the new router (and update any appropriate routing tables on the server)? The service appears to have issues with using a dual homed server and updating it isn't going to happen anytime soon.


I hope that was clear.

Thanks
August 15, 2012 12:29:19 AM

With the 10.99.x.x address were you using a 255.255.0.0 mask?

What forced you to change your internal LAN range to 192?

I assume that the 192 network has no Internet access and is just internal as you say it is your local LAN, right?

Without thinking about it too much, I doubt that you need router or that it is the answer that would solve the issue better than a router table entry or other solution.

You could make a specific router table entry (or set of entries) on the internal network computer that anything directed to a specific address (the FTP stuff) would be routed to the 10.99.1.254 gateway; would that not work for you?
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August 15, 2012 1:07:11 AM

RealBeast said:
With the 10.99.x.x address were you using a 255.255.0.0 mask?

What forced you to change your internal LAN range to 192?

I assume that the 192 network has no Internet access and is just internal as you say it is your local LAN, right?

Without thinking about it too much, I doubt that you need router or that it is the answer that would solve the issue better than a router table entry or other solution.

You could make a specific router table entry (or set of entries) on the internal network computer that anything directed to a specific address (the FTP stuff) would be routed to the 10.99.1.254 gateway; would that not work for you?


1. No, 10.99.1 is a /24.
2. att updated the router firmware so the LAN side couldn't use 10/24. Nobody has access to change the cisco 10.99 gateway to a 192.168 (that would solve the problem).
3. The 192 has access to the internet, the 10 doesn't have real access internet, it's just a MPLS wan connection to another LAN.

The table entries are sound because the transfers work initially. The ftp service works for about 15 minutes*, then start opening null connections and never really works again (ftp data connection errors). I think it's a bug in the service, however, with one network adapter assigned 10.99 the service works fine. The trick is getting the packets into 10.99.1.x on a 192.168 network.

*I fix it temporarily by disabling the adapter and restarting the service. I'm just tired of relying on that. So, I'm looking into a router solution, hoping at least.
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August 15, 2012 12:13:31 PM

It should work dual homed but...

You could use a router to solve this but it depends how complex.

You would install the router with the WAN interface on your 192 network and the lan on the 10 network. You would then define port mapping to map at least the FTP port to the server you want to access. You would then access the server by ftp to your new routers 192 address. This is the simplest to do but is limited to only working for a single server. There may be other DNS,security issues that make this method not a option. MAKE SURE YOU DISABLE DHCP.

If you want to access multiple machines in the 10 network it gets more complex. You would place the router with the WAN on the 10 network and the LAN on the 192 network. The hard part is that your PC would need to know to send the 10 network to this new router rather than your internet gateway. You could use the simple PC command ROUTE ADD 10.99.1.0 mask 255.255.255.0 192.168.?.? to solve this but if you have 100's of PC this is not a good way. You "may?" be able to put a static route in your default gateway router for the 192 network telling it to send all 10.99.1.0 traffic to your other router. Some routers do not allow you send traffic out the same interface it was received. You still should let it nat the addresses...it gets even more complex if you want to run with no nat at all.


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