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Boost Wifi to 2000+ feet outdoors

Last response: in Wireless Networking
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July 17, 2012 7:56:58 PM

Hello, what woud i need to do in order to extend my wifi It is about 2,000 feet away from me, but there are some tree's that are in the way and i live in a brick building. Is there some type of sattelite that i could install outside my window or something, or even indoors that is strong. I currently have a netgear n600 dualband router (actually have 2 of them). if there is something that would enable me to be able to have my wifi signal always available when at the pool, that would be great. I wanna work poolside and obviously dont want to spend a lot of money.
July 17, 2012 8:05:38 PM

Just realized i left out that my goal is to extend my wifi to reach the pool.
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July 17, 2012 11:35:25 PM

2000 ft is a looooooooooong way for a consumer grade router. Add some obstacles, brick walls, and well..., that's asking a lot. Esp. if you're looking for something on the cheap. These devices are only designed to accommodate the 95 percentile that need something within a radius of perhaps 100-150 ft, and even that assumes few obstacles and little interferences from competing wireless devices.

They do make long range antennas, but a serious solution will cost a few bucks. A good source would be Ubiquiti. You can actually get a very nice and powerful long range antenna for <$100 (which I consider a good deal considering the quality). I don’t know if you find that within your price range, but it’s really the kind of equipment you need. Placement will matter too, no matter the solution.

http://www.ubnt.com/

You might poke around for some consumer grade range extenders and perhaps get lucky, but I think it’s just a better use of your time and money to put out a few bucks for a real solution. At least that's what I would do.
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July 18, 2012 12:22:15 AM

Thanks so much for your help. $100 would be fine for me. Obviously I know I need to purchase something a little more customized for my needs .... I briefly looked at the site you posted and got a bit lost. What was it specifically that you were recommending on that site?seemed as if they didn't have what I would be looking for or perhaps i just am not aware?. I saw 1 dish shaped product, (didnt see price), but figured I would ask first.  How would i install? Would I plug into current router or would I plug directly into modem and use as a new router?

Also, if i did take a gamble on the antanae,  my Current router is a (netgear dual band n 600- actually have 2 of them)  Anyway, This router  does not have an actual external antennae. If I went that route,  would I need to buy a new router that had physical external antenna to replace? how would that work? I'm leaning more towards trying that first. (I said 2,000 feet), but it's probably more like 1,000. And I do see some signal at the beginning of the pool area due to placement of my router (in the attic)
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July 18, 2012 2:13:26 AM

I know, it's a bit intimidating if you've never dealt w/ these more sophisticated products. Unfortunately there are just too many to go through them all. But just as an example, consider something like the following:

http://www.amazon.com/Ubiquiti-Networks-PICO2HP-2-4GHz-...

It’s a much more powerful AP than that of your typical consumer router. It's powered via an ethernet cable using a PoE (Power Over Ethernet) adapter. And that makes it easier to mount since you’re only running the ethernet cable directly to the mount. One port of the PoE adapter runs to the antenna, the other runs to your router.

With this particular model, it could be paired with another similar antenna, thus forming a “bridge” and increasing the range even further. Obviously that wouldn’t be very practical by the pool, but someone might consider it for say a house to house (point to point) connection.

Note, I’m not specifically recommending this model, only illustrating one type of solution.

While you could try solutions that merely replace the antenna, the problem is that those antennas are still driven by the router, and that becomes your limiting factor. A wholesale AP replacement is almost always going to produce better results.
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April 16, 2014 5:07:44 PM

The Ayrstone AyrMesh Hub2n and the Ubiquiti PicoStation M2HP are the same hardware - the difference is the firmware on that hardware.

The Ubiquiti PicoStation is designed for a WISP tech and uses AirOS, Ubiquiti's proprietary firmware. It has pages and pages of options that a good tech can use to configure the radio to fit perfectly into a wireless network. It also has Ubiquiti's AirMax TDMA feature, which is very cool (if you're a WISP). It can be configured as an access point or a client device, and in a number of ways for each. It does NOT do meshing.

The AyrMesh Hub is designed for farmers and ranchers and uses Ayrstone's proprietary firmware, which has no options. It is self-configuring, using the settings from Ayrstone's cloud-based management and monitoring system. It is an 802.11 g/n WiFi Access Point and 802.11s mesh node - that's all it does.

Bottom line: if you are (or have access to) a tech, the PicoStation is probably the right product for you. If you are not a tech and don't want to hire one, or if you need a meshing solution, the AyrMesh Hub may be a better choice.
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