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Internet slow on only one computer.

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  • Computers
  • Internet
  • Networking
Last response: in Networking
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August 16, 2012 10:57:37 PM

Hi guys,

First off I'm sorry if I've posted this in the wrong section, anyway. Today I decided to move my computer from downstairs (previously Ethernet cable connected) to upstairs (to a wireless connection), I assumed it would be fine as my the internet speed is fine on my laptop which is also running on the wireless, however this what not the case.

At first my computer (in the same room as where I use my laptop) couldn't even find my 'Network?' and wouldn't even connect after manually setting it up, so I went out and bought a NetGear Wi-Fi booster 'thing' and at-last my computer picked it up and I achieved a 4-5 bar connection, but after opening my browser I realized how long pages were taking to load so I did a speed test and hit only 0.7'Mbps?' download speed whereas my laptop was achieving 10 in the same room and connected to the same network (which I THINK rules out obstructions/metal beams etc interrupting with the signal strength).

I have already made sure to update my drivers, please can anyone help find out why my computer is showing 'Excellent' signal strength yet giving me an extremely poor internet speed.

I have no clue if this will help but here is my computer details; Manufacturer: Packard Bell, Model: ixtreme M3720, System type: 64-bit Operating System.


- and also 'Realtek 8185 Extensible 802.11b/g Wireless Device.

Thankyou again and sorry for my long post!

More about : internet slow computer

August 17, 2012 12:03:12 AM

I don't know whether you've ever noticed before (maybe today qualifies as your first time), but laptops routinely get better reception w/ wireless than desktops and many other small devices. And that's because their form factor lends them to superior antenna solutions. Most use a very long antenna embedded around the screen, making it ideal once you lift the lid!

So that’s why you can use a laptop and believe all is well, then try to use other wireless adapters/devices and discover the real truth.

Just to make sure it’s not the PC, you could use the laptop as a wireless ethernet bridge. Connect the PC via ethernet to the laptop and bridge the connections under Network Connections.

Hit Windows key + R, type "ncpa.cpl" (no quotes) and hit enter. Select both the wireless and wired connections, right click, and select Bridge Connections.

Perhaps not an ideal long term solution, but if you now get the same performance as the laptop, it *is* a problem w/ your wireless adapters.
August 17, 2012 12:20:26 AM

eibgrad said:
I don't know whether you've ever noticed before (maybe today qualifies as your first time), but laptops routinely get better reception w/ wireless than desktops and many other small devices. And that's because their form factor lends them to superior antenna solutions. Most use a very long antenna embedded around the screen, making it ideal once you lift the lid!

So that’s why you can use a laptop and believe all is well, then try to use other wireless adapters/devices and discover the real truth.

Just to make sure it’s not the PC, you could use the laptop as a wireless ethernet bridge. Connect the PC via ethernet to the laptop and bridge the connections under Network Connections.

Hit Windows key + R, type "ncpa.cpl" (no quotes) and hit enter. Select both the wireless and wired connections, right click, and select Bridge Connections.

Perhaps not an ideal long term solution, but if you now get the same performance as the laptop, it *is* a problem w/ your wireless adapters.


Thanks for the fast response, I really appreciate it :) 

I'll try make a 'ethernet bridge' now and I'll let you know how it goes!
!