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bad sectors on hard drive

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August 4, 2002 9:52:41 PM

do anyone know how to ignore the bad sectors and format the hard drive or does it have anyway to fix those area ?

More about : bad sectors hard drive

August 5, 2002 1:15:56 AM

The FAQ at the top of this forum has something in it about bad sectors.

1° of separation between my monopoly and yours. That's business with .NET
August 5, 2002 1:50:05 AM

depends on the type of bad sector... if its software/data based a format will fix it up and make the sector reusable... but much more common are the physical bad sectors due to defects, dust etc.
a low level format marks these area's as bad and skips over them when formatting, so they are never used again.

finally, if you start developing bad sectors i strongly reccomend you backup all your data and start looking for a new drive, or sending back the old one if still under warantee.

<b>Before visiting THG i was a clueless noob. Now im still clueless, but look at my nice title!<b>
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August 6, 2002 12:50:07 AM

i think i have physical bad sectors,
how to make a low level format and how to skip the bad sectors,i've try many things : format x: ; format x:/c
format x:/q format c:/s
and none works it stop when it reach 14 % and stop and says that the format are not done yet
August 6, 2002 12:50:40 AM

i think i have physical bad sectors,
how to make a low level format and how to skip the bad sectors,i've try many things : format x: ; format x:/c
format x:/q format x:/s e= hard drive letter
and none works it stop when it reach 14 % and stop and says that the format are not done yet
August 6, 2002 1:00:18 AM

hmmm. not good.
go to the drive manufacturers website, and they should have a drive diagnostic program availabel to download. (for IBM its Drive Fitness Test (DFT)).

in the case of DFT if it sinds bad sectors it does the format for you, and marks off the bad sectors.

bear in mind though that this is a temporary fix only... once you start getting bad sectors you allmost guaranteed to get more.


<b>Before visiting THG i was a clueless noob. Now im still clueless, but look at my nice title!<b>
Anonymous
a b G Storage
August 10, 2002 3:40:01 PM

what does that mean exactly?
is the drive in fact fried (mine IBM 60GXP 40Go has 1 year)?
is a virus could create bad sectors especially a boot bad sector to crash the disk & all the data?
can i trust this hard disk anymore or not?
can i control the hd with a "huge" hard disk benchmark?

i would like to be sure
1) this is due to a virus or not.
2) the hard disk is OOO or not.
3) i throw the hd over the window or not.
4) moreover is i throw my both new IBM 120GXP 40GB through the window as well or not?
5) must i buy some Maxtor 740DX instead? are they more solid?

note: this hard disk was full fill when it crashed. (with 38GB/40GB of data)


thx.


i've plugged my home blower to my case ... dunno what happen ... that works?!?
<P ID="edit"><FONT SIZE=-1><EM>Edited by Corsair3200 on 08/10/02 11:54 AM.</EM></FONT></P>
August 10, 2002 6:00:00 PM

If a hard drive has a corrupted Master Boot Record because of a virus, it can usually be repaired ... one, by replacing the MBR with a backup, and/or removing the virus with repair disk (and in your case, with a repair disk made with Norton Anti-Virus); two, by booting with the WinXP installation CD, entering the <A HREF="http://www.wown.info/j_helmig/wxprcons.htm" target="_new">Recovery Console</A>, and using the FIXBOOT or the FIXMBR commands to cure the problem.

Note: With Win9x, you should start the computer with a <A HREF="http://www.mirrors.org/archived_software/www.bootdisk.c..." target="_new">boot disk</A> created on another system, and once the system has booted to the command prompt, use the FDISK /MBR command.

If this doesn't correct the problem, you'll need to low level format (Erase Disk) the drive, recreate the partition(s) and reinstall the operating system, if this was the bootable device.

Here's the instructions on how to use the <A HREF="http://www.brack.ch/technik_drivers/Festplatten_Test/IB..." target="_new">IBM Driver Fitness Test Utility</A>.

After the disk has been low level formatted, repartitioned, and formatted normally ... you should run the DFT once more, to check for errors. If it comes out clean, with no bad sectors detected, the drive may still be useable ... for how long, I cannot say. If the bad sectors were physical in nature, they will occur again; usually increasing in number over a period of time. If the bad sectors were strictly confined to the file system, then the drive should be fine.

You really need to get yourself a good backup solution, Corsair, like a tape drive, a Writable DVD drive of some kind, a CD-RW, or an external hard drive for the more valuable data that you'd rather not lose again. It might also be a good idea to pick up some imaging software like <A HREF="http://www.powerquest.com/driveimage/" target="_new">Drive Image 2002</A>, which you can use to quickly restore a backup of a partition in case something goes wrong. Running an Anti-Virus program and a software firewall is a good thing, but it's really only the first line of defense, as you discovered, unfortunately. And neither of these utilities can help you one bit if the problem turns out to be mechanical in nature.

You could also look into purchasing some data recovery software, for an emergency like this, when all else fails. Ontrack makes a good program for this purpose, called <A HREF="http://www.ontrack.com/easyrecovery/easyrecoverydatarec..." target="_new">EasyRecovery DataRecovery</A>.

I think the best you can do right now is keep a close eye on those IBM drives, and invest in a hardware/software solution for redundancy, if anything ever goes wrong again. Otherwise, if you are ever again in a position where a Boot-Sector Virus slips through, without some way of repairing the damage, and replacing the data, you are only <i>helping</i> the jerk who infected your system. People like that <i>depend</i> on the user being unskilled, or lackadaisical about maintaining a system, which includes recent Anti-Virus definitions, running an updated firewall, and owning good imaging/data recovery software.

I wouldn't allow this to happen again without fighting back, if I were you. And protecting yourself is the best way to go about that, IMHO.

Again, my sympathies for your data loss.

Toejam31

<font color=red>First Rig:</font color=red> <A HREF="http://www.anandtech.com/mysystemrig.html?rigid=17935" target="_new"><font color=green>Toejam31's Devastating Dalek Destroyer</font color=green></A>
<font color=red>Second Rig:</font color=red> <A HREF="http://www.anandtech.com/mysystemrig.html?rigid=15942" target="_new"><font color=green>Toey's Dynamite DDR Duron</font color=green></A>
__________________________________________________________

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Anonymous
a b G Storage
August 10, 2002 10:22:11 PM

thanks for all the above informations.

after some research, this was an hardware problem (btw there is a newer version of DFT which manages hardware & software bad sectors but i hadn't this one when that happened).

then i am going to buy 2 Maxtor DiamondMax Plus D740X 40GB (i don't want more than 1 plate, 2 heads; it's more solid.)

& plug them in mirroring on my 2 IBM 120GXP. my KX7-333R is RAID 0+1 capable. i don't bother about the slight loss of performances. moreover those disks are extremely cheaper.

how can i lose my data again with that setup?!?

note: raid 3 or raid 5 are too expensive for a personal use.


i've plugged my home blower to my case ... dunno what happen ... that works?!?
<P ID="edit"><FONT SIZE=-1><EM>Edited by Corsair3200 on 08/10/02 06:27 PM.</EM></FONT></P>
August 11, 2002 4:01:42 AM

yep... "for how long" is the key phrase.
my 60gxp would go bad, i would reformat and it would be great for 2-3 months then bingo... new bad sectors.

<b>Before visiting THG i was a clueless noob. Now im still clueless, but look at my nice title!<b>
August 13, 2002 11:01:36 PM

It seems that IBM is having problems with their drive platter matterial. As a designer, I can tell you this-such problems are often caused by a surface that does not have the proper surface texture. The heads ride on a thin film of air over the disk surface, this film of air is created by a slight ripple in the surface. If that ripple is not there, the heads will drag. If you have small smooth spots on an otherwise good surface, you might get a head crash only on the small smooth spot. If you have an abnormal high spot, it might get clipped by the head. And some of these problems only happen a certain drive speeds, so that a drive could pass testing at full speed but not when it slows down.

<font color=blue>You're posting in a forum with class. It may be third class, but it's still class!</font color=blue>
Anonymous
a b G Storage
August 27, 2002 1:01:56 AM

THG Crew, thanks for your reaction. perhaps am i your inspiration for some of your articles e.g. this very good, precise, meticulous & exhaustive hardware harddisk raid <A HREF="http://www17.tomshardware.com/storage/02q3/020813/ide-r..." target="_new">article</A> after my regrettable IBM 60GXP harddisk crash & all 40GB data loss among alot of anthers :wink: .
beside i am sure it is thanks to that way we can go forward as for the narrator than the reader. i don't think we can do something better than an osmosis, a reciprocity between the fortunate or unfortunate acts provoked by the adept(s) & the editor(s) response according to the subject; i have never seen something like that before; go ahead, you couldn't be wrong! :smile:

What's the moral of that story? If you would like any kind of hardware informations, have a glance to
<b>Tom's Hardware Guide Community</b>! :smile:


i've plugged my home blower to my case ... dunno what happen ... that works?!?
!