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Ways to keep my mid-tower computer cooler when gaming?

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Anonymous
April 10, 2005 10:18:29 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.action (More info?)

Hello!

I have a dilemma. I seem to have an overheating problem with my computer
setup when I play games (e.g., World of Warcraft, Battlefield 1942,
Half-Life 2, etc. Windows would crash with mostly blue screens (random
errors like PAGE_FAULT_IN_NONPAGED_AREA (50) with fwdrv.sys (still get
crashes without Kerio's Personal Firewall v2.1.5),
KERNEL_MODE_EXCEPTION_NOT_HANDLED (8e) with ntkrnlpa.exe, BugCheck 50,
{fffffff1, 0, 805b0109, 0} with ati2mtag.sys ( ati2mtag+d0d49 ),
BugCheck 8E, {c0000005, c458bf4, b7df7938, 0} with portcls.sys (
portcls!CPortPinWavePci::GetKsAudioPosition+1c ), BugCheck 7E,
{c0000005, 1d58c920, f7a5fcb0, f7a5f9ac} with win32k.sys (
win32k!ESTROBJ::vInit+357 ), etc. The crashes can take 30 minutes to
hours to happen.

I have NO problems when I am not gaming, using 3D (openGL and Direct3D)
screen savers, running atitools to stress test my ATI Radeon 9800 Pro
AIW (128 MB) card for hours, cpuburn by itself for hours (highest was
154 F/67.8 C degrees, memtest86 for hours (all passed), etc. To me, it
sounds like a combination of everything in game makes my computer too
hot instead of individual compontent. What else can be getting hot
beside the video card and motherboard during gaming? I doubt a sound
card could. I have a HDD cooler so HDDs should be fine. You can see my
full detailed system specifications at
http://alpha.zimage.com/~ant/antfarm/about/computers.tx... (primary
computer -- note that I have old stuff like old Quantum HDDs, CD burner,
etc.).

I notice my system would become unstable if my ASUS K8V SE Deluxe
motherboard's temperature was at about and over 110 F/43 C degrees.

Another problem is that my small room is always warm due to the location
and it is upstair. I do not get sufficient cooling from the air
condition. Opened window is useful when the weather is cool, but useless
when it is warm or in a middle of a heat wave (100+ F/37.7 C degrees
outside!). Big fans for my room and myself don't really help much
either.

Would getting a Thermaltake Silent Boost K8
(http://www.thermaltake.com/coolers/venus/rs/a1838.htm) to cool the
AMD Athlon 64 CPU down help at all? Again, going up to 154 with cpuburn
did not have any problems. However, BIOS and ASUS PC Probe say 140+
F/60+ C degrees is overheating so I might as well get a better CPU
cooler. I was thinking of readding my old squirrel fan blower (used it
for my old Voodoo2 card that kept overheating years ago) in the PC case,
but would it help and where would I put it? Would these be enough? I
already have Arctic Cooling VGA Silencer revision 2 for the video card
(had dot problems in DOOM 3 due to heat issue), a 3 fan HDD Peeze
cooler, two 80 mm case fans, and an Antec Model SL400 (400 watts; 80mm
and 92mm fans) power supply. Isn't this enough? I have two front vents
(HDD cooler in the middle of the full-tower ATX case and at the bottom
that is part of the case). The power supply fans blow out the heat in
the back (1/4th down from the top of the case and feels like a heater
(not hot; very warm though)), and there is another vent at the top (no
air blow out -- maybe a good place for the squirrel fan?) Note: I have
had this case since July 1998 and I never had problems with P2 300 Mhz,
P3 600 Mhz, and Athlon XP 2200+ setups before getting an Athlon 64
3200+.

The fans speed to be working normally according to ASUS PC Probe and
BIOS:
-CPU Fan (the one from the retail CPU box): 59xx
-Chassis Fan: 2556 (forgot which fan is connected to this -- don't
have a chassis fan)
-Power fan is not hooked up to the sensors, but I know it is blowing.
-Note: Voltage graphs looked stable when gaming and not.

Any suggestions on how to make my system cooler when gaming? I don't
want to go overboard like getting water cooling system. I need to fix
it before summer comes alone and so I can get back into gaming. Thank
you in advance. :) 
--
"Be thine enemy an ant, see in him an elephant." --Turkish Proverb
/\___/\
/ /\ /\ \ Ant @ The Ant Farm: http://antfarm.ma.cx
| |o o| | Ant's Quality Foraged Links: http://aqfl.net (offline)
\ _ / Please remove ANT if replying by e-mail.
( )
Anonymous
April 11, 2005 7:51:39 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.action (More info?)

more fans?


<ANTant@zimage.com> wrote in message
news:0Yydndw7svjYKcTfRVn-sQ@mminternet.net...
> Hello!
>
> I have a dilemma. I seem to have an overheating problem with my computer
> setup when I play games (e.g., World of Warcraft, Battlefield 1942,
> Half-Life 2, etc. Windows would crash with mostly blue screens (random
> errors like PAGE_FAULT_IN_NONPAGED_AREA (50) with fwdrv.sys (still get
> crashes without Kerio's Personal Firewall v2.1.5),
> KERNEL_MODE_EXCEPTION_NOT_HANDLED (8e) with ntkrnlpa.exe, BugCheck 50,
> {fffffff1, 0, 805b0109, 0} with ati2mtag.sys ( ati2mtag+d0d49 ),
> BugCheck 8E, {c0000005, c458bf4, b7df7938, 0} with portcls.sys (
> portcls!CPortPinWavePci::GetKsAudioPosition+1c ), BugCheck 7E,
> {c0000005, 1d58c920, f7a5fcb0, f7a5f9ac} with win32k.sys (
> win32k!ESTROBJ::vInit+357 ), etc. The crashes can take 30 minutes to
> hours to happen.
>
> I have NO problems when I am not gaming, using 3D (openGL and Direct3D)
> screen savers, running atitools to stress test my ATI Radeon 9800 Pro
> AIW (128 MB) card for hours, cpuburn by itself for hours (highest was
> 154 F/67.8 C degrees, memtest86 for hours (all passed), etc. To me, it
> sounds like a combination of everything in game makes my computer too
> hot instead of individual compontent. What else can be getting hot
> beside the video card and motherboard during gaming? I doubt a sound
> card could. I have a HDD cooler so HDDs should be fine. You can see my
> full detailed system specifications at
> http://alpha.zimage.com/~ant/antfarm/about/computers.tx... (primary
> computer -- note that I have old stuff like old Quantum HDDs, CD burner,
> etc.).
>
> I notice my system would become unstable if my ASUS K8V SE Deluxe
> motherboard's temperature was at about and over 110 F/43 C degrees.
>
> Another problem is that my small room is always warm due to the location
> and it is upstair. I do not get sufficient cooling from the air
> condition. Opened window is useful when the weather is cool, but useless
> when it is warm or in a middle of a heat wave (100+ F/37.7 C degrees
> outside!). Big fans for my room and myself don't really help much
> either.
>
> Would getting a Thermaltake Silent Boost K8
> (http://www.thermaltake.com/coolers/venus/rs/a1838.htm) to cool the
> AMD Athlon 64 CPU down help at all? Again, going up to 154 with cpuburn
> did not have any problems. However, BIOS and ASUS PC Probe say 140+
> F/60+ C degrees is overheating so I might as well get a better CPU
> cooler. I was thinking of readding my old squirrel fan blower (used it
> for my old Voodoo2 card that kept overheating years ago) in the PC case,
> but would it help and where would I put it? Would these be enough? I
> already have Arctic Cooling VGA Silencer revision 2 for the video card
> (had dot problems in DOOM 3 due to heat issue), a 3 fan HDD Peeze
> cooler, two 80 mm case fans, and an Antec Model SL400 (400 watts; 80mm
> and 92mm fans) power supply. Isn't this enough? I have two front vents
> (HDD cooler in the middle of the full-tower ATX case and at the bottom
> that is part of the case). The power supply fans blow out the heat in
> the back (1/4th down from the top of the case and feels like a heater
> (not hot; very warm though)), and there is another vent at the top (no
> air blow out -- maybe a good place for the squirrel fan?) Note: I have
> had this case since July 1998 and I never had problems with P2 300 Mhz,
> P3 600 Mhz, and Athlon XP 2200+ setups before getting an Athlon 64
> 3200+.
>
> The fans speed to be working normally according to ASUS PC Probe and
> BIOS:
> -CPU Fan (the one from the retail CPU box): 59xx
> -Chassis Fan: 2556 (forgot which fan is connected to this -- don't
> have a chassis fan)
> -Power fan is not hooked up to the sensors, but I know it is blowing.
> -Note: Voltage graphs looked stable when gaming and not.
>
> Any suggestions on how to make my system cooler when gaming? I don't
> want to go overboard like getting water cooling system. I need to fix
> it before summer comes alone and so I can get back into gaming. Thank
> you in advance. :) 
> --
> "Be thine enemy an ant, see in him an elephant." --Turkish Proverb
> /\___/\
> / /\ /\ \ Ant @ The Ant Farm: http://antfarm.ma.cx
> | |o o| | Ant's Quality Foraged Links: http://aqfl.net (offline)
> \ _ / Please remove ANT if replying by e-mail.
> ( )
Anonymous
April 11, 2005 3:46:49 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.action (More info?)

Those temps can't be considered good. I had always heard anything over 60
degrees celsius (for an AMD CPU) would lead to instability. Your motherboard
temp sensor is reporting 43 degrees celsius? That is way too hot for a
motherboard to be running -- that sounds more like a CPU temp. What's the
ambient temp?
--
Remove nospam to email
<ANTant@zimage.com> wrote in message
news:0Yydndw7svjYKcTfRVn-sQ@mminternet.net...
> Hello!
>
> I have NO problems when I am not gaming, using 3D (openGL and Direct3D)
> screen savers, running atitools to stress test my ATI Radeon 9800 Pro
> AIW (128 MB) card for hours, cpuburn by itself for hours (highest was
> 154 F/67.8 C degrees, memtest86 for hours (all passed), etc. To me, it
> sounds like a combination of everything in game makes my computer too
> hot instead of individual compontent. What else can be getting hot
> beside the video card and motherboard during gaming? I doubt a sound
> card could. I have a HDD cooler so HDDs should be fine. You can see my
> full detailed system specifications at
> http://alpha.zimage.com/~ant/antfarm/about/computers.tx... (primary
> computer -- note that I have old stuff like old Quantum HDDs, CD burner,
> etc.).
>
> I notice my system would become unstable if my ASUS K8V SE Deluxe
> motherboard's temperature was at about and over 110 F/43 C degrees.
>
> Another problem is that my small room is always warm due to the location
> and it is upstair. I do not get sufficient cooling from the air
> condition. Opened window is useful when the weather is cool, but useless
> when it is warm or in a middle of a heat wave (100+ F/37.7 C degrees
> outside!). Big fans for my room and myself don't really help much
> either.
>
> Would getting a Thermaltake Silent Boost K8
> (http://www.thermaltake.com/coolers/venus/rs/a1838.htm) to cool the
> AMD Athlon 64 CPU down help at all? Again, going up to 154 with cpuburn
> did not have any problems. However, BIOS and ASUS PC Probe say 140+
> F/60+ C degrees is overheating so I might as well get a better CPU
> cooler. I was thinking of readding my old squirrel fan blower (used it
> for my old Voodoo2 card that kept overheating years ago) in the PC case,
> but would it help and where would I put it? Would these be enough? I
> already have Arctic Cooling VGA Silencer revision 2 for the video card
> (had dot problems in DOOM 3 due to heat issue), a 3 fan HDD Peeze
> cooler, two 80 mm case fans, and an Antec Model SL400 (400 watts; 80mm
> and 92mm fans) power supply. Isn't this enough? I have two front vents
> (HDD cooler in the middle of the full-tower ATX case and at the bottom
> that is part of the case). The power supply fans blow out the heat in
> the back (1/4th down from the top of the case and feels like a heater
> (not hot; very warm though)), and there is another vent at the top (no
> air blow out -- maybe a good place for the squirrel fan?) Note: I have
> had this case since July 1998 and I never had problems with P2 300 Mhz,
> P3 600 Mhz, and Athlon XP 2200+ setups before getting an Athlon 64
> 3200+.
>
> The fans speed to be working normally according to ASUS PC Probe and
> BIOS:
> -CPU Fan (the one from the retail CPU box): 59xx
> -Chassis Fan: 2556 (forgot which fan is connected to this -- don't
> have a chassis fan)
> -Power fan is not hooked up to the sensors, but I know it is blowing.
> -Note: Voltage graphs looked stable when gaming and not.
>
> Any suggestions on how to make my system cooler when gaming? I don't
> want to go overboard like getting water cooling system. I need to fix
> it before summer comes alone and so I can get back into gaming. Thank
> you in advance. :) 
> --
> "Be thine enemy an ant, see in him an elephant." --Turkish Proverb
> /\___/\
> / /\ /\ \ Ant @ The Ant Farm: http://antfarm.ma.cx
> | |o o| | Ant's Quality Foraged Links: http://aqfl.net (offline)
> \ _ / Please remove ANT if replying by e-mail.
> ( )
Related resources
April 11, 2005 6:17:36 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.action (More info?)

Thus spake "moondusterone" <moondusterone@mindspring.com>, Mon, 11 Apr 2005
03:51:39 GMT, Anno Domini:

>more fans?

Or an Antec case. Love IS an Antec Sonata case :) 

--
A killfile is a friend for life.

Replace 'spamfree' with the other word for 'maze' to reply via email.
Anonymous
April 11, 2005 8:56:25 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.action (More info?)

ANTant@zimage.com wrote:
> Hello!
>
> I have a dilemma.


Remove the side of the case and leave it off. No amount of fans will
keep your PC cooler than that...
Anonymous
April 11, 2005 8:56:26 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.action (More info?)

Not true. I have two systems that feature 120mm side cover fans that blow
right on the CPU (in addition to 90mm Vantec Tornado fans blowing on the
heatsinks). If I run the system w/o the side covers the CPU's run noticeably
hotter.

--
Remove nospam to email
"Smart Feet" <smartfeet@yourshoes.com> wrote in message
news:Z_x6e.7620$um4.1613@fe1.columbus.rr.com...
> ANTant@zimage.com wrote:
>> Hello!
>>
>> I have a dilemma.
>
>
> Remove the side of the case and leave it off. No amount of fans will keep
> your PC cooler than that...
Anonymous
April 11, 2005 10:10:09 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.action (More info?)

60c is quite high to be honest, mine is currently idling at 35c, and it says
ambient is about 30c.

You could try the Akasa AK-913 cooler
http://www.akasa.com.tw/spec/coolers/spec_ak_913.htm

Another good cpu cooler is the Arctic Cooling Freezer 64:
http://www.arctic-cooling.com/cpu2.php?idx=10&disc

They were rated 1st and 2nd best in custompc magazine in the UK.

I would also suggest getting memtest86 and test your memory as my wifes PC
had similar problems and I swapped the memory out and problem ended.

Also I get the impression you are relying on your PSU to draw the hot air
out of your case, bad idea, big style. You need to improve the airflow in
your case, if you have 2 fans, you need at least 1 in and 1 out. If you have
both blowing in you may be creating "hot zones" where the air isn't moving
enough so gets hotter. There is a great explanation of this online somewhere
but I don't have the link handy, sorry.

--
Les
AMD64 3200+
2x512 MB corsair platinum 3500
MSI K8N NEO Platinum
Leadtek A400GT
SB Audigy
April 11, 2005 11:06:48 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.action (More info?)

>
> --
> Remove nospam to email
> "Smart Feet" <smartfeet@yourshoes.com> wrote in message
> news:Z_x6e.7620$um4.1613@fe1.columbus.rr.com...
>> ANTant@zimage.com wrote:
>>> Hello!
>>>
>>> I have a dilemma.
>>
>>
>> Remove the side of the case and leave it off. No amount of fans will
>> keep your PC cooler than that...

"Doug" <pigdos@nospamcharter.net> wrote in message
news:lFz6e.1767$bR1.785@fe04.lga...
> Not true. I have two systems that feature 120mm side cover fans that blow
> right on the CPU (in addition to 90mm Vantec Tornado fans blowing on the
> heatsinks). If I run the system w/o the side covers the CPU's run
> noticeably hotter.

Yes, a good case with properly positioned fans will keep things cooler than
an open case. The closed case *forces* the air to flow from the intake
vents to the exhaust vents. With an open case, the air within can tend to
remain mostly stagnant such that the CPU fan, etc. just keeps blowing the
same warm air on top of the CPU.
Anonymous
April 11, 2005 11:52:48 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.action (More info?)

Nostromo <nostromo@spamfree.net.au> wrote:
> Thus spake "moondusterone" <moondusterone@mindspring.com>, Mon, 11 Apr 2005
> 03:51:39 GMT, Anno Domini:

> >more fans?

> Or an Antec case. Love IS an Antec Sonata case :) 

Which one do you recommend I should get for my setup?
--
"Be thine enemy an ant, see in him an elephant." --Turkish Proverb
/\___/\
/ /\ /\ \ Ant @ The Ant Farm: http://antfarm.ma.cx
| |o o| | Ant's Quality Foraged Links: http://aqfl.net (offline)
\ _ / Please remove ANT if replying by e-mail.
( )
Anonymous
April 11, 2005 11:56:34 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.action (More info?)

Les Steel <a@aolnot.com> wrote:
> 60c is quite high to be honest, mine is currently idling at 35c, and it says
> ambient is about 30c.

> You could try the Akasa AK-913 cooler
> http://www.akasa.com.tw/spec/coolers/spec_ak_913.htm

> Another good cpu cooler is the Arctic Cooling Freezer 64:
> http://www.arctic-cooling.com/cpu2.php?idx=10&disc

> They were rated 1st and 2nd best in custompc magazine in the UK.

> I would also suggest getting memtest86 and test your memory as my wifes PC
> had similar problems and I swapped the memory out and problem ended.

In my original post, I already mentioned memtest86 showed no errors/problems.
Also, I only have 1 GB memory piece (1 GB of PC3200 Kingston RAM (CAS 3).


> Also I get the impression you are relying on your PSU to draw the hot air
> out of your case, bad idea, big style. You need to improve the airflow in i

Yes, it is currently set up like that. Should I add another fan to blow out
the heat at the lower vent?


> your case, if you have 2 fans, you need at least 1 in and 1 out. If you have
> both blowing in you may be creating "hot zones" where the air isn't moving
> enough so gets hotter. There is a great explanation of this online somewhere
> but I don't have the link handy, sorry.

OK and thanks, I will have to analyze this a bit more.
--
"Be thine enemy an ant, see in him an elephant." --Turkish Proverb
/\___/\
/ /\ /\ \ Ant @ The Ant Farm: http://antfarm.ma.cx
| |o o| | Ant's Quality Foraged Links: http://aqfl.net (offline)
\ _ / Please remove ANT if replying by e-mail.
( )
Anonymous
April 12, 2005 12:19:10 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.action (More info?)

<ANTant@zimage.com> wrote in message
news:0Yydndw7svjYKcTfRVn-sQ@mminternet.net...

> Any suggestions on how to make my system cooler when gaming? I don't
> want to go overboard like getting water cooling system. I need to fix
> it before summer comes alone and so I can get back into gaming. Thank
> you in advance. :) 

How about getting one of those small dorm size refrigerators, and put the
computer in there?

Just cut a hole in one side of the door to run the cables out and you can
have that comp at 40F.

Here the two comps with heating problems run with one side removed from the
case, and the power supply sitting on the table or desk.
Anonymous
April 12, 2005 5:46:07 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.action (More info?)

ANTant@zimage.com wrote:
> Les Steel <a@aolnot.com> wrote:
> > 60c is quite high to be honest, mine is currently idling at 35c,
and it says
> > ambient is about 30c.
>
> > You could try the Akasa AK-913 cooler
> > http://www.akasa.com.tw/spec/coolers/spec_ak_913.htm
>
> > Another good cpu cooler is the Arctic Cooling Freezer 64:
> > http://www.arctic-cooling.com/cpu2.php?idx=10&disc
>
> > They were rated 1st and 2nd best in custompc magazine in the UK.
>
> > I would also suggest getting memtest86 and test your memory as my
wifes PC
> > had similar problems and I swapped the memory out and problem
ended.
>
> In my original post, I already mentioned memtest86 showed no
errors/problems.
> Also, I only have 1 GB memory piece (1 GB of PC3200 Kingston RAM (CAS
3).
>
>
> > Also I get the impression you are relying on your PSU to draw the
hot air
> > out of your case, bad idea, big style. You need to improve the
airflow in i
>
> Yes, it is currently set up like that. Should I add another fan to
blow out
> the heat at the lower vent?
>
>
> > your case, if you have 2 fans, you need at least 1 in and 1 out. If
you have
> > both blowing in you may be creating "hot zones" where the air isn't
moving
> > enough so gets hotter. There is a great explanation of this online
somewhere
> > but I don't have the link handy, sorry.
>
> OK and thanks, I will have to analyze this a bit more.

I know you said you weren't inetrested in watercooling, but one of the
build-you-own-pc mags (I think it is Custom PC) is currently running a
feature on BYO PCs for under £500 - incuding watercooling. My point
being that if they can put together a gaming rig for that money, then
maybe the watercooling isn't too expensive. I saw the mag in tesco, so
it should be widely available.
April 12, 2005 10:59:37 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.action (More info?)

Thus spake "Doug" <pigdos@nospamcharter.net>, Mon, 11 Apr 2005 11:46:49
-0700, Anno Domini:

>Those temps can't be considered good. I had always heard anything over 60
>degrees celsius (for an AMD CPU) would lead to instability. Your motherboard
>temp sensor is reporting 43 degrees celsius? That is way too hot for a
>motherboard to be running -- that sounds more like a CPU temp. What's the
>ambient temp?

Methinks you live in a sub-arctic region...& don't know what you're talking
about as you're obviously parroting, not citing 1st-hand experience. Here's
some 1st-hand xp: I had my previous rig running for the best part of 3 years
with a dodgy 2ndary mobo fan (Epox 8KHA+ with an AMD 1600XP). Reason was,
noone sold fan separately - & I didn't want to be w/o for 2 weeks while
supplier replaced under warranty. Mobo ran at low 40s up to high 40s
(usually around 45); cpu from 55-70, usually around 60, but anytime the temp
would rise above 25 degrees (which is 6mths of the year here), it would go
to 65 degrees+. And guess what? No temp-related instabilities to speak of!
In fact, very little instability period. It's all about the love you see...

--
A killfile is a friend for life.

Replace 'spamfree' with the other word for 'maze' to reply via email.
Anonymous
April 12, 2005 10:59:38 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.action (More info?)

The motherboard sensor here isn't the system temp but the CPU socket sensor?
I thought he was talking about his system temp not the CPU socket sensor.
AMD 1600XP's didn't have CPU temp sensors built-in so what do you mean by
"mobo ran at low 40's to high 40's"? Do you mean the CPU socket sensor or
the system temp?

--
Remove nospam to email
"Nostromo" <nostromo@spamfree.net.au> wrote in message
news:vrol51524t0bi8p2darcaqc953s3lmcji6@4ax.com...
> Thus spake "Doug" <pigdos@nospamcharter.net>, Mon, 11 Apr 2005 11:46:49
> -0700, Anno Domini:
>
>>Those temps can't be considered good. I had always heard anything over 60
>>degrees celsius (for an AMD CPU) would lead to instability. Your
>>motherboard
>>temp sensor is reporting 43 degrees celsius? That is way too hot for a
>>motherboard to be running -- that sounds more like a CPU temp. What's the
>>ambient temp?
>
> Methinks you live in a sub-arctic region...& don't know what you're
> talking
> about as you're obviously parroting, not citing 1st-hand experience.
> Here's
> some 1st-hand xp: I had my previous rig running for the best part of 3
> years
> with a dodgy 2ndary mobo fan (Epox 8KHA+ with an AMD 1600XP). Reason was,
> noone sold fan separately - & I didn't want to be w/o for 2 weeks while
> supplier replaced under warranty. Mobo ran at low 40s up to high 40s
> (usually around 45); cpu from 55-70, usually around 60, but anytime the
> temp
> would rise above 25 degrees (which is 6mths of the year here), it would go
> to 65 degrees+. And guess what? No temp-related instabilities to speak of!
> In fact, very little instability period. It's all about the love you
> see...
>
> --
> A killfile is a friend for life.
>
> Replace 'spamfree' with the other word for 'maze' to reply via email.
Anonymous
April 12, 2005 2:17:54 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.action (More info?)

"Doug" <pigdos@nospamcharter.net> looked up from reading the entrails of
the porn spammer to utter "The Augury is good, the signs say:

>The motherboard sensor here isn't the system temp but the CPU socket sensor?
>I thought he was talking about his system temp not the CPU socket sensor.
>AMD 1600XP's didn't have CPU temp sensors built-in so what do you mean by
>"mobo ran at low 40's to high 40's"? Do you mean the CPU socket sensor or
>the system temp?

There are quite a few motherboards with two sensors on them, 1 under the
CPU socket, and one elsewhere on the board, giving you readings for the
CPU temperature and the ambient case temperature.

Xocyll
--
I don't particularly want you to FOAD, myself. You'll be more of
a cautionary example if you'll FO And Get Chronically, Incurably,
Painfully, Progressively, Expensively, Debilitatingly Ill. So
FOAGCIPPEDI. -- Mike Andrews responding to an idiot in asr
Anonymous
April 12, 2005 5:27:59 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.action (More info?)

"john graesser" <graesser@tca.net> wrote in
news:115m89ffeu5sq11@corp.supernews.com:

> How about getting one of those small dorm size refrigerators, and put
> the computer in there?
>
> Just cut a hole in one side of the door to run the cables out and you
> can have that comp at 40F.

You'd probably have a problem with condensation. But it's a good idea. :) 

--

Knight37 - http://knightgames.blogspot.com
Once a Gamer, Always a Gamer.
Anonymous
April 12, 2005 9:35:21 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.action (More info?)

<ANTant@zimage.com> wrote in message
news:_budnWXZv4hfgcbfRVn-hg@mminternet.net...
> Les Steel <a@aolnot.com> wrote:
>> 60c is quite high to be honest, mine is currently idling at 35c, and it
>> says
>> ambient is about 30c.
>
>> You could try the Akasa AK-913 cooler
>> http://www.akasa.com.tw/spec/coolers/spec_ak_913.htm
>
>> Another good cpu cooler is the Arctic Cooling Freezer 64:
>> http://www.arctic-cooling.com/cpu2.php?idx=10&disc
>
>> They were rated 1st and 2nd best in custompc magazine in the UK.
>
>> I would also suggest getting memtest86 and test your memory as my wifes
>> PC
>> had similar problems and I swapped the memory out and problem ended.
>
> In my original post, I already mentioned memtest86 showed no
> errors/problems.
> Also, I only have 1 GB memory piece (1 GB of PC3200 Kingston RAM (CAS 3).
>
>

Sorry mate, double checked your post before I wrote that too!!!
Anonymous
April 12, 2005 9:35:22 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.action (More info?)

> >> 60c is quite high to be honest, mine is currently idling at 35c, and it
> >> says
> >> ambient is about 30c.
> >
> >> You could try the Akasa AK-913 cooler
> >> http://www.akasa.com.tw/spec/coolers/spec_ak_913.htm
> >
> >> Another good cpu cooler is the Arctic Cooling Freezer 64:
> >> http://www.arctic-cooling.com/cpu2.php?idx=10&disc
> >
> >> They were rated 1st and 2nd best in custompc magazine in the UK.
> >
> >> I would also suggest getting memtest86 and test your memory as my wifes
> >> PC
> >> had similar problems and I swapped the memory out and problem ended.
> >
> > In my original post, I already mentioned memtest86 showed no
> > errors/problems.
> > Also, I only have 1 GB memory piece (1 GB of PC3200 Kingston RAM (CAS 3).

> Sorry mate, double checked your post before I wrote that too!!!

No problems. I do the same thing once in a while. :( 
--
"Be thine enemy an ant, see in him an elephant." --Turkish Proverb
/\___/\
/ /\ /\ \ Ant @ The Ant Farm: http://antfarm.ma.cx
| |o o| | Ant's Quality Foraged Links: http://aqfl.net (offline)
\ _ / Please remove ANT if replying by e-mail.
( )
Anonymous
April 12, 2005 9:42:43 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.action (More info?)

"Chadwick" <chadwick110@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:1113295567.284023.325260@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...

ANTant@zimage.com wrote:
> Les Steel <a@aolnot.com> wrote:
> > 60c is quite high to be honest, mine is currently idling at 35c,
and it says
> > ambient is about 30c.
>
> > You could try the Akasa AK-913 cooler
> > http://www.akasa.com.tw/spec/coolers/spec_ak_913.htm
>
> > Another good cpu cooler is the Arctic Cooling Freezer 64:
> > http://www.arctic-cooling.com/cpu2.php?idx=10&disc
>
> > They were rated 1st and 2nd best in custompc magazine in the UK.
>
> > I would also suggest getting memtest86 and test your memory as my
wifes PC
> > had similar problems and I swapped the memory out and problem
ended.
>
> In my original post, I already mentioned memtest86 showed no
errors/problems.
> Also, I only have 1 GB memory piece (1 GB of PC3200 Kingston RAM (CAS
3).
>
>
> > Also I get the impression you are relying on your PSU to draw the
hot air
> > out of your case, bad idea, big style. You need to improve the
airflow in i
>
> Yes, it is currently set up like that. Should I add another fan to
blow out
> the heat at the lower vent?
>
>
> > your case, if you have 2 fans, you need at least 1 in and 1 out. If
you have
> > both blowing in you may be creating "hot zones" where the air isn't
moving
> > enough so gets hotter. There is a great explanation of this online
somewhere
> > but I don't have the link handy, sorry.
>
> OK and thanks, I will have to analyze this a bit more.

>I know you said you weren't inetrested in watercooling, but one of the
>build-you-own-pc mags (I think it is Custom PC) is currently running a
>feature on BYO PCs for under £500 - incuding watercooling. My point
>being that if they can put together a gaming rig for that money, then
>maybe the watercooling isn't too expensive. I saw the mag in tesco, so
>it should be widely available.

Your right, its in the latest issue. They used the 120mm CoolRiver (CoolWave
in the US) water cooling kit, only 73 of our Great British Pounds!
April 12, 2005 10:28:59 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.action (More info?)

Thus spake "Doug" <pigdos@nospamcharter.net>, Mon, 11 Apr 2005 19:29:29
-0700, Anno Domini:

>The motherboard sensor here isn't the system temp but the CPU socket sensor?
>I thought he was talking about his system temp not the CPU socket sensor.
>AMD 1600XP's didn't have CPU temp sensors built-in so what do you mean by
>"mobo ran at low 40's to high 40's"? Do you mean the CPU socket sensor or
>the system temp?

Mobo in the 40s, cpu (socket then) in the 50s- high 60s.

--
A killfile is a friend for life.

Replace 'spamfree' with the other word for 'maze' to reply via email.
Anonymous
April 13, 2005 12:43:35 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.action (More info?)

On Mon, 11 Apr 2005 03:51:39 GMT, "moondusterone"
<moondusterone@mindspring.com> wrote:

>more fans?
>
>
><ANTant@zimage.com> wrote in message
>news:0Yydndw7svjYKcTfRVn-sQ@mminternet.net...
>> Hello!
>>
>> I have a dilemma. I seem to have an overheating problem with my computer
<snip>

When I upgraded to an AMD 2800 system with ATI 9800 Pro, I only got a
case with 2 fans (one inlet and one outlet). Not aware of the huge
amount of heat that this system would output over my older one. I
paid more attention to the power supply than the number of fans it
supported.

I soon learned that I could run longer if I kept the side panel off my
case and kept a room fan blowing near it; but even then it would
still shutdown once in awhile. The case didn't have extra room on
the rear to mount another fan.

My solution was to cut a hole in to top of the case (heat raises) and
drill some holes so I could mount a 120mm fan. Using it to blow hot
air out while the two regular case fans blow air in means 0 shutdowns
in the last 6 weeks.
Anonymous
April 15, 2005 5:58:47 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.action (More info?)

ANTant@zimage.com wrote in news:Z6udnYxPYeHC48LfRVn-iw@mminternet.net:

> I still use those old flat ribbon cables for drives. Maybe I need to
> get those round cables even though they cost more. :( 

I don't have any experience with them but to me they:
1. look cool
2. block less air-flow
3. look like they'd be easier to work with (installing and such).

If anyone has actually used them I'd appreciate the input.

--

Knight37 - http://knightgames.blogspot.com
Once a Gamer, Always a Gamer.
April 15, 2005 10:07:43 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.action (More info?)

knight37 wrote:
> ANTant@zimage.com wrote in news:Z6udnYxPYeHC48LfRVn-iw@mminternet.net:
>
>
>>I still use those old flat ribbon cables for drives. Maybe I need to
>>get those round cables even though they cost more. :( 
>
>
> I don't have any experience with them but to me they:
> 1. look cool
> 2. block less air-flow
> 3. look like they'd be easier to work with (installing and such).
>
> If anyone has actually used them I'd appreciate the input.
>

Used them for my latest PC build. They are a lot easier to use - easy
to fit and the tabs make them easy to remove again. They are very easy
to route (very pliable) and tie-in (unlike those damn ribbons) and they
definitely improve the air-flow. They do look cool (though I'm not one
for perspex sides etc so dont get to see them often). Another good
thing you dont see mentioned about them is that they dont retain dust as
easily as ribbons and are a lot easier to blast clean with a can of
compressed air. I wouldn't go back.

--
It's a bit of a jump isn't it? I mean, er, chartered accountancy to lion
taming in one go.
You don't think it might be better if you worked your way toward lion
taming, say, via banking...
Anonymous
April 19, 2005 6:54:00 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.action (More info?)

Shawk <shawk@clara.co.uk.3guesses> once tried to test me with:

>>>I still use those old flat ribbon cables for drives. Maybe I need to
>>>get those round cables even though they cost more. :( 
>>
>>
>> I don't have any experience with them but to me they:
>> 1. look cool
>> 2. block less air-flow
>> 3. look like they'd be easier to work with (installing and such).
>>
>> If anyone has actually used them I'd appreciate the input.
>>
>
> Used them for my latest PC build. They are a lot easier to use - easy
> to fit and the tabs make them easy to remove again. They are very easy
> to route (very pliable) and tie-in (unlike those damn ribbons) and they
> definitely improve the air-flow. They do look cool (though I'm not one
> for perspex sides etc so dont get to see them often). Another good
> thing you dont see mentioned about them is that they dont retain dust as
> easily as ribbons and are a lot easier to blast clean with a can of
> compressed air. I wouldn't go back.

Cool, I'll definitely consider them for my next rig.

--

Knight37 - http://knightgames.blogspot.com

Once a Gamer, Always a Gamer.
Anonymous
April 20, 2005 12:37:43 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.action (More info?)

Hi,

Xocyll <Xocyll@kingston.net> wrote:
#To the O.P., if you don't have one, get a full tower case. Yes it's
#bigger and bulkier, but it will have more space inside (for better
#airflow) and more places to mount fans (to get serious airflow).

Good idea. Too bad it is so hard to find IDE cables to actually make use
of all those high-up 5.25 server bays.

#Don't buy "stealth" fans; They're quiet because they DON'T move much
#air, and if you are in a fairly hot ambient environment you're going to
#have to move lots of air through the case.

Hmm.

#[I bought a stealth fan once (only thing available locally at the time)
#to replace the power supply fan in an old K6 system (pentium 1
#equivalent), and it moved so little air the system kept shutting down.]

If you replaced an 80mm PS fan with a low-RPM 80mm quiet fan, yes, that
was a Bad Idea(tm). If that was the only exhaust fan in your PC, that
was an Exceptionally Bad Idea(tm). But that one mistake does not
invalidate the concept of low-RPM quiet fans.

First of all, many of the new quiet(er) power supplies use low-RPM fans,
they just use 120mm or even 140mm versions. Many of them either vary the
speed of that fan (good idea) or have a supplemental 80mm for high heat
conditions (not so good idea). Even when revved-up the 120's and 140's
run a fairly slow RPM quietly, and move more air than a fast 80mm.

Secondly, low-RPM fans can be as useful than the high speed ones, IF
(and only IF) properly deployed. The first thing I did is use a dremel
to remove all the stamped-in fan grills in my steel case. The next thing
is I did is use more of them, including a sensor controlled multi-speed
fan as an emergency back-up.

#Don't buy the "computer/sensor controlled multi speed fans" - it's a
#hell of a lot easier to become accustomed to even fairly loud fans, IF
#they run at a constant speed. A few weeks and you'll hardly even notice
#the fan noise anymore.

After a few months of my 5-hi-speed-fan extravaganza PC build last year,
I was ready to tear my hair out, pound my head against the wall, even
spend money and time to JUST MAKE IT STOP. I chose the last option.

On the way to a quiet build I bought a few fans which I don't use now,
including some sensor controlled fans. There are two basic types, ones
that the sensor is calibrated for ambient temperature, the other for
under CPU/GPU heat sinks. The ambient types usually have a built-in
sensor, a few have a remote. The ones with a remote are REALLY useful
because you can use them as a variable-speed INPUT fan, which is really
nice, as the input fan is the hardest to hear.

#The multi speed ones on the other hand are always changing speed so
#you'll never get the same "background noise" effect.

My one multi-speed fan has sped-up ONCE in a couple of months since I
redid my PC to a "quiet build." I assume it did so because it needed to.
I responded by turning on the A/C, which made me feel more comfortable
as well, and it hasn't revved-up since.

The end result, my idle CPU temp hasn't changed, my MB temp idles 2
degree F higher and just stays there, and my peak CPU and GPU temps are
several degrees F lower. I don't have a quantitative measure of the
sound difference, I can only say that when the screen blanker/saver is
activated, I have to look at the front panel to see if it is on. :) 

Ken.
--
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mail: kmarsh at charm dot net | Just say "no" to liars SCO and Soyo
WWW: http://www.charm.net/~kmarsh | Return services to local CIS offices!
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
April 20, 2005 6:03:26 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.action (More info?)

Thus spake kmarsh@fellspt.charm.net (Ken Marsh), Tue, 19 Apr 2005 20:37:43
GMT, Anno Domini:

I have a dream...a pc in a fridge in another room. I'd have one too if it
wasn't for that damn DVI video cable length limit - argghhhhh!!!

>The end result, my idle CPU temp hasn't changed, my MB temp idles 2
>degree F higher and just stays there, and my peak CPU and GPU temps are
>several degrees F lower. I don't have a quantitative measure of the
>sound difference, I can only say that when the screen blanker/saver is
>activated, I have to look at the front panel to see if it is on. :) 
>
>Ken.

Mine never goes off. So I know it's on. But yes, those large fans (such as
in my Antec Sonata case I got recently with my new rig) are a dream. Is
there like a stock option on those? ;-)

--
A killfile is a friend for life.

Replace 'spamfree' with the other word for 'maze' to reply via email.
Anonymous
April 30, 2005 5:12:00 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.action (More info?)

kmarsh@fellspt.charm.net (Ken Marsh) looked up from reading the entrails
of the porn spammer to utter "The Augury is good, the signs say:

>Hi,
>
>Xocyll <Xocyll@kingston.net> wrote:
>#To the O.P., if you don't have one, get a full tower case. Yes it's
>#bigger and bulkier, but it will have more space inside (for better
>#airflow) and more places to mount fans (to get serious airflow).
>
>Good idea. Too bad it is so hard to find IDE cables to actually make use
>of all those high-up 5.25 server bays.

I used the ones that came with the motherboard.
No problem at all, even for the 3.5" floppy drive which is above the 5
5.25" drive bays.

>#Don't buy "stealth" fans; They're quiet because they DON'T move much
>#air, and if you are in a fairly hot ambient environment you're going to
>#have to move lots of air through the case.
>
>Hmm.
>
>#[I bought a stealth fan once (only thing available locally at the time)
>#to replace the power supply fan in an old K6 system (pentium 1
>#equivalent), and it moved so little air the system kept shutting down.]
>
>If you replaced an 80mm PS fan with a low-RPM 80mm quiet fan, yes, that
>was a Bad Idea(tm). If that was the only exhaust fan in your PC, that
>was an Exceptionally Bad Idea(tm). But that one mistake does not
>invalidate the concept of low-RPM quiet fans.

It was the only thing available and it couldn't move enough air to keep
the power supply in an old computer from overheating.
A fan like that is NOT going to move enough air in a computer to make a
difference unless you had 20+ of them.
With this thing plugged in and running, with nothing occluding it in any
way, you could barely feel the airflow.

>First of all, many of the new quiet(er) power supplies use low-RPM fans,
>they just use 120mm or even 140mm versions. Many of them either vary the
>speed of that fan (good idea) or have a supplemental 80mm for high heat
>conditions (not so good idea). Even when revved-up the 120's and 140's
>run a fairly slow RPM quietly, and move more air than a fast 80mm.

This wasn't a new power supply, this is an old K6 system (aka Pentium 1)
original power supply of the AT case.

>Secondly, low-RPM fans can be as useful than the high speed ones, IF
>(and only IF) properly deployed. The first thing I did is use a dremel
>to remove all the stamped-in fan grills in my steel case. The next thing
>is I did is use more of them, including a sensor controlled multi-speed
>fan as an emergency back-up.

For someone who is already facing overheating problems like the original
poster, stealth fans are a mistake because they are not going to move
enough air to solve the problem.

>#Don't buy the "computer/sensor controlled multi speed fans" - it's a
>#hell of a lot easier to become accustomed to even fairly loud fans, IF
>#they run at a constant speed. A few weeks and you'll hardly even notice
>#the fan noise anymore.
>
>After a few months of my 5-hi-speed-fan extravaganza PC build last year,
>I was ready to tear my hair out, pound my head against the wall, even
>spend money and time to JUST MAKE IT STOP. I chose the last option.

Sounds like you bought those fans that move super-ultra-mega amounts of
cf/m worth of air, at the cost of extremely high noise.

>On the way to a quiet build I bought a few fans which I don't use now,
>including some sensor controlled fans. There are two basic types, ones
>that the sensor is calibrated for ambient temperature, the other for
>under CPU/GPU heat sinks. The ambient types usually have a built-in
>sensor, a few have a remote. The ones with a remote are REALLY useful
>because you can use them as a variable-speed INPUT fan, which is really
>nice, as the input fan is the hardest to hear.

That's kind of funny in a way, because the ONLY fan I hear is the intake
fan. The 4 exhaust fans (counting the power supply) are all standard
80mm normal speed fans, the intake fan is a 120mm high flow (86cf/m or
thereabouts.)

>#The multi speed ones on the other hand are always changing speed so
>#you'll never get the same "background noise" effect.
>
>My one multi-speed fan has sped-up ONCE in a couple of months since I
>redid my PC to a "quiet build." I assume it did so because it needed to.
>I responded by turning on the A/C, which made me feel more comfortable
>as well, and it hasn't revved-up since.

And here you have the fallacy of your build choice.
Your computer is in an air-conditioned environment, so you can get away
with using stealth fans because your ambient temperature is lower.

The original poster (and myself) are not in air conditioned environments
and have much higher ambient temperatures (well I have none, and he has
ineffective AC.)

If you're going to cool the system with a high ambient temperature,
you're going to have to move a lot of air.


I had a first hand example of this with the old K6, since my father
upgraded at the same time I did, same case, same motherboard, same CPU,
same not-very-good heatsink/fan for the CPU.

Mine overheated all the time after summer rolled around, until I got a
better cooler, his never had a problem - the difference is his computer
was in the basement of an air conditioned house, while mine was in an a
non AC'd apartment.

The ambient temperature made all the difference between adequate and
inadequate cooling.

Xocyll
--
I don't particularly want you to FOAD, myself. You'll be more of
a cautionary example if you'll FO And Get Chronically, Incurably,
Painfully, Progressively, Expensively, Debilitatingly Ill. So
FOAGCIPPEDI. -- Mike Andrews responding to an idiot in asr
!