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Is the Geforce 6600GT the best AGP card for under $200?

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Anonymous
April 16, 2005 3:41:24 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.action (More info?)

I have an Athlon 2400 with 512 PC400 DDR ram. Budget is tight and I
want to upgrade just so I could play Doom3 and those new 3D games. Is
the Geforce 6600GT AGP the best choice for my needs?
Anonymous
April 16, 2005 9:21:04 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.action (More info?)

On 15 Apr 2005 23:41:24 -0700, "Riddick" <chromallly@yahoo.com> wrote:

>I have an Athlon 2400 with 512 PC400 DDR ram. Budget is tight and I
>want to upgrade just so I could play Doom3 and those new 3D games. Is
>the Geforce 6600GT AGP the best choice for my needs?

I'm pleased with my 6600GT/AGP. It pretty much doubled my framerate
from my old 5900XT (which, admittedly, wasn't the best of cards, but
still...). Doom3 runs at >60FPS for me now, and I got out of
single-digit hell for the 3DMark03 benchmark. Just avoid the PNY
Verto; it runs very hot, and it's not even overclocked (although it's
hard to tell, since they've disabled the thermal sensor in the BIOS).

I replaced mine with a BFG 6600GT/AGP, which -although it comes from
the store overclocked- runs much, much cooler. I don't know if it's
the best 6600GT/AGP out there, but it's definitely better than the
Verto (besides, you gotta love a company that calls itself "BFG" :) 

My machine is an AMD 3000XP Barton with 1024MB DDR RAM. It's still a
capable machine, but I think that now it's the CPU (and other
"back-end" components, like RAM and the bus) that are limiting my
potential framerates; I'm not sure that -were I to get a faster video
card- I'd see much of an improvement.
Anonymous
April 17, 2005 1:08:05 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.action (More info?)

Same here AMD 2ghz CPu 1 ig ram. And a 6600 GT Leadtek :) 

Very happy chappy runs everything FAST FAST FAST and thats at
1024by768 with AA 4 AF 8 BItching.


Its the best Bang for Buck card you can buy.

/PS my version is the AGP version. That costs more but it still is
great value for money.


On Sat, 16 Apr 2005 17:21:04 GMT, Spalls Hurgenson <yoinks@ebalu.com>
wrote:

>On 15 Apr 2005 23:41:24 -0700, "Riddick" <chromallly@yahoo.com> wrote:
>
>>I have an Athlon 2400 with 512 PC400 DDR ram. Budget is tight and I
>>want to upgrade just so I could play Doom3 and those new 3D games. Is
>>the Geforce 6600GT AGP the best choice for my needs?
>
>I'm pleased with my 6600GT/AGP. It pretty much doubled my framerate
>from my old 5900XT (which, admittedly, wasn't the best of cards, but
>still...). Doom3 runs at >60FPS for me now, and I got out of
>single-digit hell for the 3DMark03 benchmark. Just avoid the PNY
>Verto; it runs very hot, and it's not even overclocked (although it's
>hard to tell, since they've disabled the thermal sensor in the BIOS).
>
>I replaced mine with a BFG 6600GT/AGP, which -although it comes from
>the store overclocked- runs much, much cooler. I don't know if it's
>the best 6600GT/AGP out there, but it's definitely better than the
>Verto (besides, you gotta love a company that calls itself "BFG" :) 
>
>My machine is an AMD 3000XP Barton with 1024MB DDR RAM. It's still a
>capable machine, but I think that now it's the CPU (and other
>"back-end" components, like RAM and the bus) that are limiting my
>potential framerates; I'm not sure that -were I to get a faster video
>card- I'd see much of an improvement.
Related resources
Anonymous
April 17, 2005 10:30:23 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.action (More info?)

Spalls Hurgenson wrote:

> Just avoid the PNY
> Verto; it runs very hot, and it's not even overclocked (although it's
> hard to tell, since they've disabled the thermal sensor in the BIOS).

Can't tell for the AGP version but my PCIe Verto 6600GT runs cool, and also
the thermal sensor and the fan control are working fine...

Maybe You just got a lemon?

Benjamin
Anonymous
April 18, 2005 1:15:00 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.action (More info?)

The PNY Verto I bought the first time 'round had a SERIOUS heat problem.
Fans were plugged in and running, but not doing the job - maybe the heat
sink got separated from the chip? I could unfreeze a locked-up screen
during 3DMark testing by hitting it with a burst of compressed air.

Took THAT one back and got another.

This one seems to work okay, but again, the card's BIOS has the heat
sensor disabled. There IS a work-around that lets you enable it, check
out NVidia's forums.

M.O.
http://www.playmaille.com
http://www.madocowain.com


Benjamin Gawert wrote:
> Spalls Hurgenson wrote:
>
>
>>Just avoid the PNY
>>Verto; it runs very hot, and it's not even overclocked (although it's
>>hard to tell, since they've disabled the thermal sensor in the BIOS).
>
>
> Can't tell for the AGP version but my PCIe Verto 6600GT runs cool, and also
> the thermal sensor and the fan control are working fine...
>
> Maybe You just got a lemon?
>
> Benjamin
>
>
Anonymous
April 18, 2005 6:51:06 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.action (More info?)

On Sun, 17 Apr 2005 18:30:23 +0200, "Benjamin Gawert" <bgawert@gmx.de>
wrote:

>Spalls Hurgenson wrote:

>> Just avoid the PNY
>> Verto; it runs very hot, and it's not even overclocked (although it's
>> hard to tell, since they've disabled the thermal sensor in the BIOS).

>Can't tell for the AGP version but my PCIe Verto 6600GT runs cool, and also
>the thermal sensor and the fan control are working fine...

>Maybe You just got a lemon?


Well, I don't know if its running hot was that unusual; it *could* be
that the fan or thermal paste wasn't properly fixed to the GPU.
However, online reviews indicate that their PNYs ran hot too, so more
likely it's just poorly designed cooling. The PCI-E Verto probably has
a better fan/heatsink, as it is considered a (slightly) higher-end
card than its AGP equivilant.

However, PNY's Verto 6600GT AGP definitely has had its thermal sensor
disabled in BIOS, as confirmed by an email from PNY themselves. Other
brands -but not all- of the AGP 6600GTs have also had their thermal
sensors disabled. Fortunately, there is a hack to get it working
again; it has been theorised that the sensor was disabled by the
companies to discourage overclocking.

However, there is at least *one* PNY Verto has its thermal sensor
working, since I hacked mine to gauge how hot it was running. When I
saw it was peaking 140C while playing Doom3, I took it back

(I told the nice store clerk about it too, in case they wanted to
challenge me for returning damaged equipment. Fortunately, all she
cared about was that all the bits and bobs were in the box, so I was
able to return it with no problem. But if you're in the NY area and
you get a PNY Verto 6600GT AGP with a working thermal sensor, you have
me to thank :-)
Anonymous
April 18, 2005 6:53:05 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.action (More info?)

On Sun, 17 Apr 2005 21:15:00 -0500, Madoc Owain
<nospam@madocowain.com> wrote:

>The PNY Verto I bought the first time 'round had a SERIOUS heat problem.
>Fans were plugged in and running, but not doing the job - maybe the heat
>sink got separated from the chip? I could unfreeze a locked-up screen
>during 3DMark testing by hitting it with a burst of compressed air.
>
>Took THAT one back and got another.
>
>This one seems to work okay, but again, the card's BIOS has the heat
>sensor disabled. There IS a work-around that lets you enable it, check
>out NVidia's forums.
>

PNY is not on MY list of recommended vendors of nVidia GPU cards.
Want a RMA ? ---- take the slow boat to China.... literally. And it
might just sink without trace in a typhoon....

Highly recommend that anybody that purchases an expensive PNY
card also purchase a no-questions-asked-immediate-replacement
extended third-party warranty ( such as the CompUSA one ).

John Lewis

>M.O.
>http://www.playmaille.com
>http://www.madocowain.com
>
>
>Benjamin Gawert wrote:
>> Spalls Hurgenson wrote:
>>
>>
>>>Just avoid the PNY
>>>Verto; it runs very hot, and it's not even overclocked (although it's
>>>hard to tell, since they've disabled the thermal sensor in the BIOS).
>>
>>
>> Can't tell for the AGP version but my PCIe Verto 6600GT runs cool, and also
>> the thermal sensor and the fan control are working fine...
>>
>> Maybe You just got a lemon?
>>
>> Benjamin
>>
>>
Anonymous
April 18, 2005 4:07:44 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.action (More info?)

140 degrees celsius? Damn that's hot. I don't think there are any CPU's that
will survive @ that temp. I'm assuming this temp destroyed your vid-card?

--
Remove nospam to email
"Spalls Hurgenson" <yoinks@ebalu.com> wrote in message
news:p e7661tnr7v0789rtvvmpgtofdatfj4pha@4ax.com...
> On Sun, 17 Apr 2005 18:30:23 +0200, "Benjamin Gawert" <bgawert@gmx.de>
> wrote:
>
> However, there is at least *one* PNY Verto has its thermal sensor
> working, since I hacked mine to gauge how hot it was running. When I
> saw it was peaking 140C while playing Doom3, I took it back
>
> (I told the nice store clerk about it too, in case they wanted to
> challenge me for returning damaged equipment. Fortunately, all she
> cared about was that all the bits and bobs were in the box, so I was
> able to return it with no problem. But if you're in the NY area and
> you get a PNY Verto 6600GT AGP with a working thermal sensor, you have
> me to thank :-)
>
>
Anonymous
April 18, 2005 8:00:14 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.action (More info?)

Get a Leadtek never gos above 60c, and most of the time 40c. Also very
very quiet.


On Mon, 18 Apr 2005 02:51:06 GMT, Spalls Hurgenson <yoinks@ebalu.com>
wrote:

>On Sun, 17 Apr 2005 18:30:23 +0200, "Benjamin Gawert" <bgawert@gmx.de>
>wrote:
>
>>Spalls Hurgenson wrote:
>
>>> Just avoid the PNY
>>> Verto; it runs very hot, and it's not even overclocked (although it's
>>> hard to tell, since they've disabled the thermal sensor in the BIOS).
>
>>Can't tell for the AGP version but my PCIe Verto 6600GT runs cool, and also
>>the thermal sensor and the fan control are working fine...
>
>>Maybe You just got a lemon?
>
>
>Well, I don't know if its running hot was that unusual; it *could* be
>that the fan or thermal paste wasn't properly fixed to the GPU.
>However, online reviews indicate that their PNYs ran hot too, so more
>likely it's just poorly designed cooling. The PCI-E Verto probably has
>a better fan/heatsink, as it is considered a (slightly) higher-end
>card than its AGP equivilant.
>
>However, PNY's Verto 6600GT AGP definitely has had its thermal sensor
>disabled in BIOS, as confirmed by an email from PNY themselves. Other
>brands -but not all- of the AGP 6600GTs have also had their thermal
>sensors disabled. Fortunately, there is a hack to get it working
>again; it has been theorised that the sensor was disabled by the
>companies to discourage overclocking.
>
>However, there is at least *one* PNY Verto has its thermal sensor
>working, since I hacked mine to gauge how hot it was running. When I
>saw it was peaking 140C while playing Doom3, I took it back
>
>(I told the nice store clerk about it too, in case they wanted to
>challenge me for returning damaged equipment. Fortunately, all she
>cared about was that all the bits and bobs were in the box, so I was
>able to return it with no problem. But if you're in the NY area and
>you get a PNY Verto 6600GT AGP with a working thermal sensor, you have
>me to thank :-)
>
Anonymous
April 19, 2005 8:38:10 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.action (More info?)

On Mon, 18 Apr 2005 12:07:44 -0700, "Doug" <pigdos@nospamcharter.net>
wrote:

>140 degrees celsius? Damn that's hot. I don't think there are any CPU's that
>will survive @ that temp. I'm assuming this temp destroyed your vid-card?

Erm, sorry; it was 120C, not 140C. Still plenty hot. And yes, it
survived (and ran) just fine. It's not recommended that you run your
chips at those temperature for long periods of time, but they won't
(shouldn't) go belly-up from a few hours at those heats. It will
reduce the lifespan of your card, though, and high temperatures can
cause errors leading to BSODs and errors in games. Plus, summer's
coming up, and with the increased ambient temperatures I expected the
chip-temp to go up by ten or twenty degrees.

One of the things that annoyed me about not having a functional
thermal sensor was that without one the card couldn't throttle itself
if it started getting too hot (it automatically reduces the GPU's
clockspeed and the memory's data rate when certain temperatures are
exceeded).

This is not just a feature useful only to overclockers; it also helps
protect the card from itself. When the heat sink fan failed on my
nvidia GF5900, the card intelligently throttled down. Fortunately, all
that had happened was that the auxillary power connected was loose, so
it was an easy fix, but had the card not throttled itself, who knew
how hot it would have gotten? Of the many fans in my computers, the
most likely to fail have always been those on video-cards. With
graphic cards running hotter with every generation, it's almost a
crime to disable a feature like this.
!