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Configuration of SSD & HDD storage roles

Last response: in Windows 7
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April 28, 2012 6:25:24 PM

Window 7 Home 64-bit
180GB Corsair Force 3 SSD [C:]
1TB WD Caviar Black SATA3 HDD [E:]

I would like to configure my SSD to work as a boot drive and the primary location for storing programs that I either use most frequently or take the longest time to load.

I would like the HDD to handle all other file storage and management, including multimedia, documents, and all the little writes that slowly take up space as you use a Windows PC. If possible, I would like to "freeze" the SSD so that no additional data is stored on it unless I explicitly place the data there in Windows explorer (or 'Save As' to that location).

I'm not sure if this is a matter of simply setting a disk quota for my SSD that is equal to the amount of data that already exists on it (so no more data is accumulated) or if it's more complicated than that. I also am not sure about which Windows & system files can be migrated to the E: drive without interfering with system stability. I've heard that moving the Users folder may accomplish this, but when trying to do so, I am prompted about how several files cannot be transferred due to the fact that they are in use.

Perhaps I'm going about this the wrong way entirely :lol:  Please help!
a b $ Windows 7
April 28, 2012 7:03:29 PM

Well, I've been running my machine using only 64Gb on SSD for about 5 months now, and I still have 14Gb spare. I just ensure all downloads are directed to the HDD and any software that I don't use regularly is installed there also. Another recommendation from a similar thread was to disable Hibernation and limit the Page File (Virtual Memory) to 1024Mb. Temp Internet files can also be directed to your HDD
April 28, 2012 7:13:27 PM

dodger46 said:
... and any software that I don't use regularly is installed there also...


Lol, so u install stuff on both? Now why would u do such a stupid thing? Use the SSD to install all software and the HDD to store data(music, pictures, kits etc). Simple as that, never install software on both SDD/HDD.
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April 28, 2012 7:43:24 PM

st4rkill3r said:
Lol, so u install stuff on both? Now why would u do such a stupid thing? Use the SSD to install all software and the HDD to store data(music, pictures, kits etc). Simple as that, never install software on both SDD/HDD.


Why not? What's the difference if you don't care about how long it takes to load either because it's a simple program or you rarely use it?

Quote:
Well, I've been running my machine using only 64Gb on SSD for about 5 months now, and I still have 14Gb spare. I just ensure all downloads are directed to the HDD and any software that I don't use regularly is installed there also. Another recommendation from a similar thread was to disable Hibernation and limit the Page File (Virtual Memory) to 1024Mb. Temp Internet files can also be directed to your HDD


I actually prefer to keep hibernation activated because I have more than enough space to handle 16GB saves to the SSD whenever this is activated. Yes, that might lead you to say, "Well then why do you care about making sure every little file makes its way to the HDD instead of the SSD if you have so much extra space already?" and the answer is: "Because I'm like that. Very meticulous." And I also firmly believe that developing good system habits of saving data mostly to the HDD will mean that I'll keep that extra space available on the SSD well into the future. I will certainly find a use for it someday.

As for setting up the direction of temp files to the HDD, I'm aware this would be beneficial but I'm afraid I don't know how to do this in a way that will be "set and forget" so to speak. In other words, set it up once to save temp files to the HDD and never have to worry about temp files squeaking by onto the SSD without you noticing: How would this be accomplished?
April 28, 2012 9:31:19 PM

Move the location of all your user folders to the D:// drive (e.g. Downloads, Desktop, Documents).

This will ensure that Windows uses the D: drive automatically for all your user files.

Don't worry about the temp files. They're generally pretty small and you can delete them periodically.
April 29, 2012 12:53:47 AM

jsrudd said:
Move the location of all your user folders to the D:// drive (e.g. Downloads, Desktop, Documents).

This will ensure that Windows uses the D: drive automatically for all your user files.

Don't worry about the temp files. They're generally pretty small and you can delete them periodically.


This is shaping up to be a far more difficult task than simply dragging and dropping the Users folder to the HDD.

I closely following this LifeHacker guide to moving the Users directory in Windows 7
which opts to permanently create a mirror copy of the current Users folder on the HDD, then it deletes the Users folder on the SSD, and finally creates a symbolic link from the SSD :\Users directory to the HDD :\Users directory so any processes that still attempt to refer to the SSD directory will be fooled into following the link to the HDD instead without any errors. In theory, it's exactly what I want, but in practice it caused some serious issues:

I followed the instructions carefully but found that when I completed the Command Prompt tasks and restarted the computer, I was met with an error message when trying to log into my password protected User Profile. The error message reads, "The User Profile Service failed the logon. User profile cannot be loaded." - It took me a while but I reversed the process I had just established in the Command Prompt through booting in safe mode, and was able to revert to the save state I had created before starting this process. I was then able to log into my User Profile again and Windows and all my files were functioning properly and in the right place. I noticed that the Users directory had successfully been copied to the HDD (by viewing it in Windows Explorer) so I'm 100% certain that the process worked. It seems that where it broke down had something to do with the symbolic link not being recognized when trying to log into the User Profile.

Anyway, I gave that a shot and here I am at square one. The technique I just explained (and failed at) seemed perfect to me - It accomplished the storage of User files to the HDD but kept all the functions in tact through the symbolic link. It was also "set and forget," meaning after it theoretically worked the first time I would never have to pay it any mind again, save for cleaning up small temp files and the like. Too bad it didn't work, though. If anyone knows where I went wrong, please let me know.

So the point I'm making in this specific post is that I am still not sure how / able to move the Users directory to the HDD from the SSD permanently. I cannot drag-and-drop or cut-and-paste it into the HDD from the SSD (although I can Copy-and-paste it), but even then all I'm doing is creating a second version of the primary Users folder - it's not actually taking over the job of the other Users folder by storing new files and acting as the reference point for programs that use the Users directory. I need another method.

Please help!
a b $ Windows 7
April 29, 2012 6:55:42 AM

Can't help you with the Users but Temp Internet files are easy enough
Open Ie/Tools/Internet Options/Browsing History/Move Folder.
Given that all downloads have the option of 'Save As' I always choose the HDD, and as for Documents the same applies, but as they take up little space I don't always bother, just do a bit of housekeeping once a month or so and shift them across. Apart from keeping a weather eye on 'C' now and again it all runs very smoothly without doing anything too fancy! And as for st4kill3r's comment I'll treat it with the contempt it deserves, perhaps he didn't notice I only have a 64Gb SSD to play with... Good luck with the Users...
!