Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question
Solved

Intel CPU, PROCESSOR_ARCHITECTURE = AMD64?

Last response: in Windows 7
Share
April 29, 2012 9:53:15 AM

Hi all,
I have a strange question, I was trying to fix a different issue in windows 7 and ended up in my "Environment Variables." (System Properties/Advanced System Settings/Environment Variables.)
Under "system variables" there are a few categories and values.
For example, it correctly recognizes my Intel CPU under "PROCESSOR_IDENTIFIER" with the value "Intel64 Family 6 Model 42 Stepping 7, GenuineIntel."
However, in the box above that one, named "PROCESSOR_ARCHITECTURE" the value is "AMD64."
I do have an AMD graphics card, so the other AMD folder paths weren't bothering me, but this cant be right...
How did this happen? Or is AMD 64 the correct value? If not, what would the correct value be? Do any other Intel SB owners have this as well?


Thanks!

Best solution

April 29, 2012 2:08:25 PM

Yep, that's right. The 64 bit extensions to the x86 architecture were invented and first implemented by AMD. Intel were laggards to the 64 bit party because they were hoping to transition away from x86 architecture and move us towards IA64. IA64 already existed in the form of the Itanium and Intel was hoping to transition towards that. Despite being a far better and more efficient architecture, lacking the inherent design flaws of x86, it suffered through lack of compatibility and it never took off except in the commercial space. AMD effectively forced Intel's hand by introducing the Sledgehammer, which was effectively a 64bit chip based on the x86 architecture. Hence the name AMD64.
Share
Related resources
a b $ Windows 7
April 29, 2012 2:13:23 PM

AMD holds the patent.
m
0
l
April 29, 2012 6:11:10 PM

Hmm. Didn't know that. I guess that was back in the day when AMD was on top. Well thanks for the answers!

Why was 64-bit created? To be able to execute more data with fewer strings/clock cycles?
m
0
l
April 29, 2012 6:11:45 PM

Best answer selected by Max1s.
m
0
l
April 29, 2012 6:25:05 PM

Max1s said:
Hmm. Didn't know that. I guess that was back in the day when AMD was on top. Well thanks for the answers!

Why was 64-bit created? To be able to execute more data with fewer strings/clock cycles?


One reason is memory addressability. With 32-bits you can only create 2^32, or 4294967296 distinct addresses. If each address point to 1 byte of data that means that with a 32-bit address you can address up to a maximum of 4GB of memory.

This is why Windows 32-bit can only make use of 4GB of memory.

Also like you said you can natively handle data of larger values.
m
0
l
a b å Intel
April 29, 2012 6:30:07 PM

bwrlane said:
Yep, that's right. The 64 bit extensions to the x86 architecture were invented and first implemented by AMD. Intel were laggards to the 64 bit party because they were hoping to transition away from x86 architecture and move us towards IA64. IA64 already existed in the form of the Itanium and Intel was hoping to transition towards that. Despite being a far better and more efficient architecture, lacking the inherent design flaws of x86, it suffered through lack of compatibility and it never took off except in the commercial space. AMD effectively forced Intel's hand by introducing the Sledgehammer, which was effectively a 64bit chip based on the x86 architecture. Hence the name AMD64.

Microsoft shared some of the blame/credit. They were already supporting AMD and they told Intel that they would not support another version of Windows. Intel bit the bullet, licensed the AMD64 extensions, and went with the market.
m
0
l
January 19, 2013 1:44:32 PM

they are still the only ones to do triple core processors AMD that is
m
0
l
!