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Basic Cabling Question for Home Recording Studio

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Anonymous
September 9, 2004 9:07:41 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Greetings, all:

My apologies if this newsgroup is too high-powered for a novice
question about home recording; I surfed around trying to find a more
appropriate forum for beginners, without much success. If anybody
knows a great place for home recording newbies like myself to compare
notes, I'd welcome any suggestions!

What I'm dealing with right now is a question of cabling. All I'm
trying to do is record some simple tunes using a Shure SM58 and a
Guild electric/acoustic guitar. I'm trying to run both the vocals and
guitar through a Behringer UB802 mixer and into my sound card.

Unfortunately, when I use my existing 1/4" cables, I'm getting a
pretty good hum coming through the system. Oddly, however, the moment
I physically touch the side of one of the plugs on these cables the
hum practically disappears. Is this a grounding issue of some kind?
Or a sign of a vastly inferior or damaged cable? It's gotten to where
I have to awkwardly hold my foot up and wrap my toes around the input
plug while I play if I want to get a decent sound; hardly an optimal
arrangement!

So I'm wondering a couple of things. First of all, would using an
XLR-to-XLR connection from my microphone produce a better sound,
instead of the XLR-to-1/4" connector I use now? Secondly, should I
buy a premium 1/4"-to-1/4" cable for my guitar as a likely resolution
to the "humming" problem? And should this be of the "balanced" or
"unbalanced" variety?

Any help or tips would be greatly appreciated!

More about : basic cabling question home recording studio

Anonymous
September 10, 2004 8:04:51 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Matt from Seattle wrote:
> Unfortunately, when I use my existing 1/4" cables, I'm getting a
> pretty good hum coming through the system. Oddly, however, the moment
> I physically touch the side of one of the plugs on these cables the
> hum practically disappears. Is this a grounding issue of some kind?
> Or a sign of a vastly inferior or damaged cable? It's gotten to where
> I have to awkwardly hold my foot up and wrap my toes around the input
> plug while I play if I want to get a decent sound; hardly an optimal
> arrangement!
>
> So I'm wondering a couple of things. First of all, would using an
> XLR-to-XLR connection from my microphone produce a better sound,
> instead of the XLR-to-1/4" connector I use now? Secondly, should I
> buy a premium 1/4"-to-1/4" cable for my guitar as a likely resolution
> to the "humming" problem? And should this be of the "balanced" or
> "unbalanced" variety?

First thing you should do is turn down everything but the microphone
and see if the hum is still there. Second thing you should do is turn
down everything but the guitar and see if the hum is still there.

Most likely it's your guitar, but that's not for sure.

As for cabling, unless the cable is defective, replacing your 1/4"
to 1/4" instrument cable with a higher-quality one isn't going to
make any difference as far as hum goes, as long as they are of the
same basic construction (and 1/4" instrument cables are pretty
simple).

As for the microphone, your XLR-to-1/4" cable is probably not
balanced. It is possible to build a 1/4" cable that carries a
balanced signal[1], but it is not usually done that way with
microphones and anyway I don't think most mixers' 1/4" channel
inputs are balanced inputs. Anyway, balanced is generally
better in that if there is noise external to the cable, the
balanced circuit will reject it. (In a balanced circuit, the
microphone or other sound source produces two signals that
are identical except for being opposite voltage, i.e. basically
one is positive when the other's negative. The input on the
mixer or whatever then presents two identical loads, one to
each "leg", and it reverses one of the two signals before it
adds them together. Since the two wires carrying opposite
signals run alongside each other, they pick up virtually the
same noise, and the balanced input cancels the noise out when
it inverts and adds.) So, balanced doesn't really sound
"better", but the one thing it does do is that it rejects noise
that might be picked up by the *cabling*.

Aaaanyway, not having a balanced cable on your microphone is
probably not the source of your hum. So it would be a good
idea to go with a balanced cable (which typically means XLR
on both ends), but it's unlikely to eliminate your hum problem.

If I were you, I'd do some experimentation. If you can borrow
other cables from a friend, that would be a good idea. You might
also want to make sure your equipment (particularly your mixer)
is plugged into a properly-grounded outlet. Also, listen to
your mixer's output with headphones or something when it's not
connected to your sound card.

- Logan

[1] The 1/4" phone plug will then have three contacts instead of
two on it. That's commonly called TRS, for Tip, Ring, and
Sleeve, which are the names of the three different contacts.
Anonymous
September 10, 2004 12:46:24 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

>
>So I'm wondering a couple of things. First of all, would using an
>XLR-to-XLR connection from my microphone produce a better sound,
>instead of the XLR-to-1/4" connector I use now? Secondly, should I
>buy a premium 1/4"-to-1/4" cable for my guitar as a likely resolution
>to the "humming" problem? And should this be of the "balanced" or
>"unbalanced" variety?
>

You have two XLR microphone inputs on your Behringer. Use them.

The hum is almost certainly your guitar. Does it occur when the
guitar is NOT plugged in to the mixer? You need a correctly wired
undamaged lead. You don't need an expensive one. The output isn't
balanced, so a balanced cable is unnecessary.

What sort of guitar? What pickup?

CubaseFAQ www.laurencepayne.co.uk/CubaseFAQ.htm
"Possibly the world's least impressive web site": George Perfect
Related resources
Anonymous
September 10, 2004 2:17:00 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Matt from Seattle"

>
> What I'm dealing with right now is a question of cabling. All I'm
> trying to do is record some simple tunes using a Shure SM58 and a
> Guild electric/acoustic guitar. I'm trying to run both the vocals and
> guitar through a Behringer UB802 mixer and into my sound card.
>
> Unfortunately, when I use my existing 1/4" cables, I'm getting a
> pretty good hum coming through the system. Oddly, however, the moment
> I physically touch the side of one of the plugs on these cables the
> hum practically disappears. Is this a grounding issue of some kind?


** The guitar is the problem - likely the bridge is not wired to the
earth of the electrics. It is essential that the strings of the guitar are
wired to ground - so that when you play the strings earth YOU.

Is the guitar a steel string acoustic with some kind of bug pickup fitted ?

If so, hum is a common problem.



> So I'm wondering a couple of things. First of all, would using an
> XLR-to-XLR connection from my microphone produce a better sound,

** No.

> Secondly, should I buy a premium 1/4"-to-1/4" cable for my guitar as a
likely resolution
> to the "humming" problem?


** No.

And should this be of the "balanced" or
> "unbalanced" variety?


** All guitar leads are unbalanced.




......... Phil
Anonymous
September 10, 2004 7:02:13 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Laurence Payne <l@laurenceDELETEpayne.freeserve.co.uk> wrote in message news:<gmm2k0t4dld3ll26cidic3pk0eapcd77s1@4ax.com>...

> You have two XLR microphone inputs on your Behringer. Use them.

Sounds like that's the consensus on the microphone inputs; I'll switch
to a pure XLR setup, just for the improved connection mechanism even
if I can't tell a major difference in the sound quality.

> The hum is almost certainly your guitar. Does it occur when the
> guitar is NOT plugged in to the mixer? You need a correctly wired
> undamaged lead. You don't need an expensive one. The output isn't
> balanced, so a balanced cable is unnecessary.
>
> What sort of guitar? What pickup?

I have narrowed the hum down to the guitar, as you suspected. It hums
not only when I go though the mixer, but also when just plugged in
directly to my amp using a single 1/4" cable. And still, as soon as I
touch one of the plugs, the hum virtually disappears. The model of
the guitar is a Guild F4CE-NTHR and I'm simply using the built-in
pickup that came originally with the guitar when I bought it. I don't
any specific make or model information on the pickup unit that I can
pass along. I did try switching cables, however, just to make sure
that wasn't the problem, and I got the same hum with another "known
good" cable.

So assuming it's some malfunction with the guitar, is there anything I
might be able to do to fix it or is this a job for the repair shop?
I've had the guitar for years, and barely used it, so I'd be surprised
if there was actual damage to the instrument in any way.

Any further suggestions would be appreciated -- you (and your
colleagues) on this board has already been a great help in diagnosing
the problem...
Anonymous
September 10, 2004 7:33:50 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Matt from Seattle wrote:

> Greetings, all:

[snip]

> appropriate forum for beginners, without much success. If anybody
> knows a great place for home recording newbies like myself to compare
> notes, I'd welcome any suggestions!

Sounds like a description of alt.music.home-studio. It's on google. See
you there :-)

--
***My real address is m/ike at u/nmusic d/ot co dot u/k (removing /s)
np:
http://www.unmusic.co.uk
http://www.unmusic.co.uk/Top_50_Films.html - favorite films
http://www.unmusic.co.uk/amh-s.html - alt.music.home-studio
Anonymous
September 11, 2004 5:55:49 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Matt from Seattle wrote:
> I have narrowed the hum down to the guitar, as you suspected. It hums
> not only when I go though the mixer, but also when just plugged in
> directly to my amp using a single 1/4" cable. And still, as soon as I
> touch one of the plugs, the hum virtually disappears. The model of
> the guitar is a Guild F4CE-NTHR and I'm simply using the built-in
> pickup that came originally with the guitar when I bought it. I don't
> any specific make or model information on the pickup unit that I can
> pass along. I did try switching cables, however, just to make sure
> that wasn't the problem, and I got the same hum with another "known
> good" cable.
>
> So assuming it's some malfunction with the guitar, is there anything I
> might be able to do to fix it or is this a job for the repair shop?
> I've had the guitar for years, and barely used it, so I'd be surprised
> if there was actual damage to the instrument in any way.

Well, as luck would have it, I have a 9 or 10 year old Guild F4CE-NT,
so I just tried it with my cheap Epiphone practice bass amp and a
cheap Guitar Center cable I have that I would guess is maybe 15 or 20
feet long. Cranked everything up as much as I could (having to
vigorously mute the strings to avoid feedback, actually), and basically
no hum. Well, there is just a little, but that occurs even if I have
nothing plugged into the amp's input. As I said, it's a cheap amp.

However, then I got one of those two-prong to three-prong adapters
that one uses if one wants to avoid proper grounding. Mine conveniently
has the ground screw tab thing broken off so I am assured of no
connection. I plugged the bass amp into the wall with that thing.
With it, I get a noticeable hum. Not atrocious, but still definitely
there.

So I guess the only information I have is that a Guild F4CE guitar
shouldn't normally have a hum problem. That doesn't necessarily mean
your guitar's pickup is bad. Have you checked to ensure you have a
good ground on the outlet your mixer is plugged into? You could
try moving the mixer to a different outlet or a different circuit,
or even a different house if that's convenient.

Another totally different idea is to just not record with the built-in
pickup. Pickups usually sound OK but not great. Supposedly these
days you can buy basically decent condenser mics for pretty cheap,
so you might be able to get a cheap instrument mic and just use that.

- Logan
Anonymous
September 11, 2004 3:04:42 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

(snip)

> So I guess the only information I have is that a Guild F4CE guitar
> shouldn't normally have a hum problem. That doesn't necessarily mean
> your guitar's pickup is bad. Have you checked to ensure you have a
> good ground on the outlet your mixer is plugged into? You could
> try moving the mixer to a different outlet or a different circuit,
> or even a different house if that's convenient.

Thanks for all of your advice, Logan and Phil.

Having tried the guitar in another outlet, and still gotten the hum,
it sounds like Phil's original diagnosis of the strings not being
"earthed" is likely the source of the problem. At this stage, since
I'm not very handy about these types of electrical issues -- and am
not really sure what "earthed" means, even -- I'll have to take the
unit into a guitar store and see if they can make the needed
adjustments.

I've thought about using a condenser mike to record some guitar
tracks, instead of an actual pickup, but the pickup setup is obviously
a lot more convenient and I don't have the $$$ for a decent condenser.
I'd also prefer to have a fully functional guitar since it's a pretty
nice instrument and it would bother me knowing that it's got an
internal malfunction.

If you have any other final thoughts, pass 'em along. Otherwise, I'll
probably be hitting the repair shop in a couple of days...
Anonymous
September 12, 2004 6:36:09 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Logan Shaw wrote:

> Phil Allison wrote:
>
> > "Logan Shaw"
> >
> >>Are the strings normally grounded on acoustic guitars with pickups?
>
> > ** Yes - it is standard practice on all electric guitars.
>
> Doesn't that seem like a red herring since we are talking about
> an acoustic guitar and not an electric?

The OP referred to his guitar as a "Guild electric/acoustic guitar".

I assume that means an electric guitar with a voice box rather than a solid
body type - and *not* an acoustic guitar with an added pickup.

< snip >

> Actually, the hum goes away when the OP touches the connector on the
> cable (or the mixer? some connector...). It has not yet been verified
> that this connector is actually connected to any ground.

If nothing else ( e.g. with Class II isolated equipment ) , it's connected
to 'electronics ground'.

This is the clue.

If the guitarist is grounded the problem goes away.


Graham
Anonymous
September 12, 2004 6:43:40 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Logan Shaw wrote:

> However, then I got one of those two-prong to three-prong adapters
> that one uses if one wants to avoid proper grounding. Mine conveniently
> has the ground screw tab thing broken off so I am assured of no
> connection.

Do you have good life insurance ? Do your gigging friends have good life
insurance ?

The ground connection isn't there just to look pretty ( nor to be snapped
off ).

If you read the manual or back panel - expect to see a notice saying
something like "this equipment must be grounded".

There's a good reason for that.


Graham.

p.s. some equipment doesn't need grounding - but instead has to be
manufactured to much higher levels of shock protection and insulation to
meet safety regulations - don't assume all gear is the same.

Lifting an earth ( especially cutting a ground lug ) to cure hum is a sure
sign of possible trouble coming your way.
Anonymous
September 12, 2004 11:23:03 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Pooh Bear wrote:
> Logan Shaw wrote:
>>Phil Allison wrote:
>>>"Logan Shaw"

>>>>Are the strings normally grounded on acoustic guitars with pickups?

>>> ** Yes - it is standard practice on all electric guitars.

>>Doesn't that seem like a red herring since we are talking about
>>an acoustic guitar and not an electric?

> The OP referred to his guitar as a "Guild electric/acoustic guitar".
>
> I assume that means an electric guitar with a voice box rather than a solid
> body type - and *not* an acoustic guitar with an added pickup.

Just to clear things up, here are some photos of a Guild F4CE:

http://home.austin.rr.com/logan/guild-f4ce/

Unfortunately, it's just about impossible to see inside to tell what
the pickup is like. All I can tell is that it there is a relatively
thick (compared to the super-thin one that goes to the 1/4" output
plug) cable headed towards the bridge. It's probably more than two
conductors based on thickness. I can't see anything more because
the X-brace blocks the view.

- Logan
Anonymous
September 12, 2004 11:30:25 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Pooh Bear wrote:
> Logan Shaw wrote:

>>However, then I got one of those two-prong to three-prong adapters
>>that one uses if one wants to avoid proper grounding. Mine conveniently
>>has the ground screw tab thing broken off so I am assured of no
>>connection.

> Do you have good life insurance ? Do your gigging friends have good life
> insurance ?

This is not the kind of amp you'd take to a gig. ;-)

But no need to worry: I just plugged the amp into the adapter thing
for a few short moments to test out whether that had an effect on the
sound. For the past ten years or so, that little ground-cheating
adapter thingy has sat in my "box of random electronic crud" that I
keep under the bed.

> Lifting an earth ( especially cutting a ground lug ) to cure hum is a sure
> sign of possible trouble coming your way.

Actually, I was using this little adapter dealy to test whether there
would be more hum if the amp was not properly grounded, and sure enough,
there was more hum that way.

- Logan
Anonymous
September 12, 2004 11:43:42 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <rPS0d.14552$ug2.2166@fe2.texas.rr.com> lshaw-usenet@austin.rr.com writes:

> Just to clear things up, here are some photos of a Guild F4CE:

It certainly looks like an acoustic guitar with no metal to connect to
the strings unless there's a metal plate under the bridge that the
ball ends contact. Doubt it.

I'd look at the part of the system between the wire coming from the
pickup and the amplifier input stage. There are a lot of possibilites
there, and having another guitar, another amplifier, and a known good
(well shielded, properly wired, and not broken) cable to substitute
one at a time would be a good troubleshooting approach.



--
I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
Anonymous
September 12, 2004 3:17:13 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Logan Shaw"
Phil Allison wrote:

> >>
> >>Are the strings normally grounded on acoustic guitars with pickups?
>
> > ** Yes - it is standard practice on all electric guitars.
>
> Doesn't that seem like a red herring since we are talking about
> an acoustic guitar and not an electric?


** Bullshit - it is an "electric" guitar.

It has a pickup - it is being used with an amplifier - so it is an
electric guitar.



> Anyway, my point is that neither a guitar shop nor he nor anyone else
> can fix the guitar, because the guitar is not broken. It is working
> as designed.


** The OP's one hums, that is a fixable fault - you imbecile.


>
> > ** Did you read the OP at all ????
> >
> > The hum goes away when the OP touches ground !!!!!
>
> Actually, the hum goes away when the OP touches the connector on the
> cable (or the mixer? some connector...). It has not yet been verified
> that this connector is actually connected to any ground.


** Of course it is ground - you imbecile.

Grounding his body is what stops the hum since it prevents AC electric
field injecting into the pickup and wiring of the guitar.



> > Earthed strings will do that for him automatically.
>
> That would only affect the hum while he's touching the strings.


** Guitarists tend to do that.




............. Phil
Anonymous
September 12, 2004 4:50:42 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On 10 Sep 2004 15:02:13 -0700, mbyoungquist@hotmail.com (Matt from
Seattle) wrote:

>I have narrowed the hum down to the guitar, as you suspected. It hums
>not only when I go though the mixer, but also when just plugged in
>directly to my amp using a single 1/4" cable.

Is your system properly grounded? I believe some backward nations
(like the US ;-) allow ungrounded mains power connectors. Is your
system running from a grounded power outlet?

CubaseFAQ www.laurencepayne.co.uk/CubaseFAQ.htm
"Possibly the world's least impressive web site": George Perfect
Anonymous
September 12, 2004 4:50:43 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Laurence Payne" wrote...
> Is your system properly grounded? I believe some backward
> nations (like the US ;-) allow ungrounded mains power connectors.

Au contraire, grounded outlets are required everywhere for
new contstruction (AFAIK). And GFCI for anywhere where
there is moisture (bath, kitchen, outdoors, etc.) Furthermore,
ground-lift "adapters" (as mentioned by Mr. Shaw) are illegal
in all the jurisdictions I am familiar with.
Anonymous
September 12, 2004 4:50:44 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Richard Crowley <rcrowley7@xprt.net> wrote:
>"Laurence Payne" wrote...
>> Is your system properly grounded? I believe some backward
>> nations (like the US ;-) allow ungrounded mains power connectors.
>
>Au contraire, grounded outlets are required everywhere for
>new contstruction (AFAIK). And GFCI for anywhere where
>there is moisture (bath, kitchen, outdoors, etc.) Furthermore,
>ground-lift "adapters" (as mentioned by Mr. Shaw) are illegal
>in all the jurisdictions I am familiar with.

The code says that those adaptors can be used ONLY when connected to the
center screw of a box that is itself grounded, in order to provide a grounded
outlet in older buildings with ungrounded outlets.

Unfortunately, many of those older buildings use 2-conductor Romex or knob
and tube wiring, so the boxes are not grounded. Buildings wired with BX
cable, conduit, or 2-with-ground Romex are okay because there is a path
from the box to the panel ground.

On the other hand, 2-prong outlets ARE legal for new construction in Japan.
--scott
--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
Anonymous
September 12, 2004 8:34:09 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

<< I believe some backward
> nations (like the US ;-) allow ungrounded mains power connectors. >>



While not disputing that the US is indeed a backward nation, grounded power has
been required in all aplications for many decades. Electrical code in the US is
a matter of local jurisdiction, although they all tend to update to
approximately the same level of safety considerations en masse. Mexico is
another matter, where I have yet to see a grounded outlet in any application.

Scott Fraser
Anonymous
September 12, 2004 9:48:31 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Logan Shaw"
>
> Just to clear things up, here are some photos of a Guild F4CE:
>
> http://home.austin.rr.com/logan/guild-f4ce/
>

** Excellent pics - is that a volume knob on the side near the neck ??

Is there a pre-amp with a battery inside ??


> Unfortunately, it's just about impossible to see inside to tell what
the pickup is like.


** Piezo electric for sure - mounted somewhere under the bridge.


> All I can tell is that it there is a relatively
> thick (compared to the super-thin one that goes to the 1/4" output
> plug) cable headed towards the bridge.


** So there is ** SOMETHING ** in between ???

Did you never dream it might be an idea to describe it ?

Is it a box or just the volume pot ?

Based on the pics, that type of guitar does no have earthed strings. The PU
is supposed to be shielded well enough to do the job - but things can go
wrong. Earthing the strings will not be so simple - but may be the easiest
fix.



............. Phil
Anonymous
September 12, 2004 10:06:47 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On 12 Sep 2004 16:34:09 GMT, scotfraser@aol.com (ScotFraser) wrote:

>While not disputing that the US is indeed a backward nation, grounded power has
>been required in all aplications for many decades. Electrical code in the US is
>a matter of local jurisdiction, although they all tend to update to
>approximately the same level of safety considerations en masse.

Are 3-prong power plugs the norm?

CubaseFAQ www.laurencepayne.co.uk/CubaseFAQ.htm
"Possibly the world's least impressive web site": George Perfect
Anonymous
September 12, 2004 10:06:48 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Laurence Payne" <l@laurenceDELETEpayne.freeserve.co.uk> wrote in message
news:qf09k0pvae9p36828c0qb0dt08fdqng92f@4ax.com...
> On 12 Sep 2004 16:34:09 GMT, scotfraser@aol.com (ScotFraser) wrote:
>
> >While not disputing that the US is indeed a backward nation, grounded
power has
> >been required in all aplications for many decades. Electrical code in the
US is
> >a matter of local jurisdiction, although they all tend to update to
> >approximately the same level of safety considerations en masse.
>
> Are 3-prong power plugs the norm?
>
Yes. At least for new construction. However, you're not required to go in
and re-wire 50 year old houses to meet the newer codes.

--
Dave Martin
Java Jive Studio
Nashville, TN
www.javajivestudio.com
Anonymous
September 12, 2004 11:37:30 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On Sun, 12 Sep 2004 18:05:03 GMT, "Dave Martin" <dmainc@earthlink.net>
wrote:

>> Are 3-prong power plugs the norm?
>>
>Yes. At least for new construction. However, you're not required to go in
>and re-wire 50 year old houses to meet the newer codes.

That wasn't my question :-) Given that earthed receptacles are
available, is it the norm for equipment to be connected with a 3-prong
plug and cable? Or is the earth connection frequently ignored? My
(limited and doubtless out-of-date) knowledge of US equipment suggests
this might be the case.

CubaseFAQ www.laurencepayne.co.uk/CubaseFAQ.htm
"Possibly the world's least impressive web site": George Perfect
Anonymous
September 12, 2004 11:37:31 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Laurence Payne" <l@laurenceDELETEpayne.freeserve.co.uk> wrote in message
news:sk59k01pb2kqqn6m0h9pe15rcutlo4mo4p@4ax.com...

> That wasn't my question :-) Given that earthed receptacles are
> available, is it the norm for equipment to be connected with a 3-prong
> plug and cable? Or is the earth connection frequently ignored? My
> (limited and doubtless out-of-date) knowledge of US equipment suggests
> this might be the case.
>
In new electrical equipment, three pronged cables are the norm - most audio
equipment comes with standard IEC cables, which have three prongs.

--
Dave Martin
Java Jive Studio
Nashville, TN
www.javajivestudio.com
Anonymous
September 13, 2004 12:03:29 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Logan Shaw"

> By the way, regarding grounding strings, there are times when
> you're playing that your fingers need to be off the strings.
> For instance, when playing harmonics, you need to get your finger
> off as quickly as possible. Or, another thing I do sometimes[1]
> is let some notes ring and then grab the head (about where the
> logo is) and wiggle it to get a subtle vibrato effect. Anyway,
> these tend to be times you're playing quietly, so it'd be a
> bummer to hear a hum just then.


** Go tell Fender, Gibson, Rickenbacker, Gretsch and dozens of other
makers your ideas.

They all ground the strings and there is more hum when the player lifts
has his hand off them.

That is the way things are.




............ Phil
Anonymous
September 13, 2004 12:03:30 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <2qil7hF107r5jU1@uni-berlin.de> philallison@tpg.com.au
Phil Allison the Grand Poobah of Parrot Poop writes:

> ** Go tell Fender, Gibson, Rickenbacker, Gretsch and dozens of other
> makers your ideas.
>
> They all ground the strings and there is more hum when the player lifts
> has his hand off them.
>
> That is the way things are.
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^


I'll take that as concurrence with my original statement that I'm
surprised that electric guitars work as well as they do.

Ciricular logic does eventually get you around to seeing my point,
doesn't it?


--
I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
Anonymous
September 13, 2004 3:53:42 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Laurence Payne wrote:

> On 12 Sep 2004 16:34:09 GMT, scotfraser@aol.com (ScotFraser) wrote:
>
>
>>While not disputing that the US is indeed a backward nation, grounded power has
>>been required in all aplications for many decades. Electrical code in the US is
>>a matter of local jurisdiction, although they all tend to update to
>>approximately the same level of safety considerations en masse.
>
>
> Are 3-prong power plugs the norm?

I'd have to say neither is the norma. There is a lot of both.

For instance, devices that use a "brick" transformer that plugs directly
into the outlet don't usually have a ground. It wouldn't help you much
anyway, since the only thing coming out is low-voltage DC. This gives
you the extra flexibility to rotate the annoying transformer 180 degrees
(assuming the blades of the plug are symmetrical; they are not always,
but they can be) so as to possibly not block the other receptacle that
you're not using.

Virtually all computer equipment (except stuff with wall wart transformers)
uses a three-prong plug. Virtually everything you might use outdoors
has a three-prong plug. Most tools are three-prong, but not all.

Most lamps are two-prong, but polarized (meaning the plug can only go
in one way, since one blade of the plug is wider). Televisions and
home stereo equipment tend to be two-prong polarized. Pro audio
equipment tends to be three-prong.

Newer things are more likely to be three-prong. Wall warts are about
the only thing made anymore that I know of which is two prong and
not polarized.

- Logan
Anonymous
September 13, 2004 10:08:09 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

<< Are 3-prong power plugs the norm? >>

The norm? Heck, it's the law!


Scott Fraser
Anonymous
September 13, 2004 10:12:13 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On 12 Sep 2004 22:52:09 -0700, mbyoungquist@hotmail.com (Matt from
Seattle) wrote:


> Do you get hum with the (previously unmentioned) guitar amplifier
>> disconnected from your computer?
>
>Yes. In the most basic setup I've tried, I'm simply plugging the
>guitar into the amplifier, which is plugged into the wall. No mixers,
>computers, or other components are part of the signal chain -- and the
>hum still occurs.

Cool. And just to be perfectly clear, there are no wires between
the guitar amp and the mixer. Literally, none. Right?

Believe me; I do have good reason to ask.

Chris Hornbeck
Anonymous
September 13, 2004 2:45:04 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

> Cool. And just to be perfectly clear, there are no wires between
> the guitar amp and the mixer. Literally, none. Right?

Nope, no other connections at all. Just the guitar, cable, and amp.
I still get the same loud buzzing/humming sound (similar to the noise
you get when you accidentally unplug your guitar from the amp without
killing the power) and it stops (almost totally) when I touch my
finger either of the metal jacks on the end of the cable.

What's your hypothesis?
Anonymous
September 13, 2004 4:02:33 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On 12 Sep 2004 14:06:34 -0700, mbyoungquist@hotmail.com (Matt from
Seattle) wrote:

>Thanks again, everybody. Let me know if there are any final thoughts
>or tests that I might perform at home -- I probably won't be taking
>the guitar in for a few days still...


Hook a temporary length of lightweight cable from the strings to the
outer case of the jack plug. If this makes no difference, hook it
to a known grounded item of gear. Can you lose the hum this way?



CubaseFAQ www.laurencepayne.co.uk/CubaseFAQ.htm
"Possibly the world's least impressive web site": George Perfect
Anonymous
September 13, 2004 4:51:37 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Mike Rivers" = Grand Poobah of Parrot Poop
>
Phil Allison
> >
> > ** Go tell Fender, Gibson, Rickenbacker, Gretsch and dozens of other
> > makers your ideas.
> >
> > They all ground the strings and there is more hum when the player
lifts
> > has his hand off them.
>
> > That is the way things are.
> ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
>
>
> I'll take that as concurrence with my original statement that I'm
> surprised that electric guitars work as well as they do.


** Mike has no idea he is describing himself.

He is the surprised one - because he is pig so ignorant.


>
> Ciricular logic.....



** The parrots forte.




............. Phil
Anonymous
September 13, 2004 5:51:41 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <ad2fa77a.0409130945.2d5c8022@posting.google.com>,
Matt from Seattle <mbyoungquist@hotmail.com> wrote:
>> Cool. And just to be perfectly clear, there are no wires between
>> the guitar amp and the mixer. Literally, none. Right?
>
>Nope, no other connections at all. Just the guitar, cable, and amp.
>I still get the same loud buzzing/humming sound (similar to the noise
>you get when you accidentally unplug your guitar from the amp without
>killing the power) and it stops (almost totally) when I touch my
>finger either of the metal jacks on the end of the cable.
>
>What's your hypothesis?

You have a ground problem, in that something is not grounded that should be.
Probably an internal problem on the guitar.
--scott
--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
Anonymous
September 13, 2004 7:41:44 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Matt from Seattle" <mbyoungquist@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:ad2fa77a.0409122152.20718c73@posting.google.com...

> Yes. In the most basic setup I've tried, I'm simply plugging the
> guitar into the amplifier, which is plugged into the wall. No mixers,
> computers, or other components are part of the signal chain -- and the
> hum still occurs. I've ruled out a bad cable as a possibility, and
> the amp does just fine with my other guitar, so it sounds like my
> Guild guitar pickup is the root of the problem as most people have
> already suggested.

Either the pickup, or the internal preamp -- sounds like there's a bad
connection someplace inside the instrument. In either case, yes, it's time
to take it into the shop.

Peace,
Paul
!