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Ultra-flexible cat-5?

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Anonymous
September 10, 2004 7:33:11 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

The Furman HDS-6 headphone distribution system uses CAT5 cable to carry
audio to the mic-stand receiver stations. CAT5 is annoyingly stiff and
doesn't like to coil up or lay out of the way, and probably isn't really
rugged enough to withstand constant moving, stepping, mic-stand
crushing, etc.

Does anyone know of either (a) ultra-flexible CAT-5 that handles more
like braided audio cable, or (b) coil-cord CAT-5 like a telephone
receiver? I checked with igus, who make flexible cat-5, but theirs is
flexible as in "can be bent back and forth a lot without breaking",
not flexible as in limp-spaghetti.

--
Jay Levitt |
Wellesley, MA | Hi!
Faster: jay at jay dot eff-em | Where are we going?
http://www.jay.fm | Why am I in this handbasket?

More about : ultra flexible cat

Anonymous
September 10, 2004 7:43:03 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Fri, 10 Sep 2004 15:33:11 -0400, jay+news@jay.fm suggested:
: The Furman HDS-6 headphone distribution system uses CAT5 cable to carry
: audio to the mic-stand receiver stations. CAT5 is annoyingly stiff and
: doesn't like to coil up or lay out of the way, and probably isn't really
: rugged enough to withstand constant moving, stepping, mic-stand
: crushing, etc.
:
: Does anyone know of either (a) ultra-flexible CAT-5 that handles more
: like braided audio cable, or (b) coil-cord CAT-5 like a telephone
: receiver? I checked with igus, who make flexible cat-5, but theirs is
: flexible as in "can be bent back and forth a lot without breaking",
: not flexible as in limp-spaghetti.

I think that the problem is that only stiff cable will work with the
standard crimpers for putting the connectors on the end.

--
agreenbu @ nyx . net andrew michael greenburg
September 11, 2004 3:21:18 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Jay Levitt wrote:
> The Furman HDS-6 headphone distribution system uses CAT5 cable to carry
> audio to the mic-stand receiver stations. CAT5 is annoyingly stiff and
> doesn't like to coil up or lay out of the way, and probably isn't really
> rugged enough to withstand constant moving, stepping, mic-stand
> crushing, etc.
>
> Does anyone know of either (a) ultra-flexible CAT-5 that handles more
> like braided audio cable, or (b) coil-cord CAT-5 like a telephone
> receiver? I checked with igus, who make flexible cat-5, but theirs is
> flexible as in "can be bent back and forth a lot without breaking",
> not flexible as in limp-spaghetti.
>

I believe ProCo has something like that. I was just on their web site
and couldn't find it. Give them a call. It was a cat5 cable that was
very flexible and had an outer jacket like a mic cable. Basically
designed for applications like yours.

--
Eric

Practice Your Mixing Skills
Multi-Track Masters on CD-ROM
www.Raw-Tracks.com
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Anonymous
September 11, 2004 3:26:25 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Actually there are two types of rj45 connectors one for solid wire and one
for stranded wire. what sort of connectors is on this cable and what type of
signal. cat 5 is probably used because it is cheap.

Bob

"andrewunix" <agreenbu@nyx.net> wrote in message
news:slrnck4803.r7l.agreenbu@nyx3.nyx.net...
> Fri, 10 Sep 2004 15:33:11 -0400, jay+news@jay.fm suggested:
> : The Furman HDS-6 headphone distribution system uses CAT5 cable to carry
> : audio to the mic-stand receiver stations. CAT5 is annoyingly stiff and
> : doesn't like to coil up or lay out of the way, and probably isn't really
> : rugged enough to withstand constant moving, stepping, mic-stand
> : crushing, etc.
> :
> : Does anyone know of either (a) ultra-flexible CAT-5 that handles more
> : like braided audio cable, or (b) coil-cord CAT-5 like a telephone
> : receiver? I checked with igus, who make flexible cat-5, but theirs is
> : flexible as in "can be bent back and forth a lot without breaking",
> : not flexible as in limp-spaghetti.
>
> I think that the problem is that only stiff cable will work with the
> standard crimpers for putting the connectors on the end.
>
> --
> agreenbu @ nyx . net andrew michael greenburg
Anonymous
September 11, 2004 4:49:53 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

andrewunix <agreenbu@nyx.net> wrote:
>Fri, 10 Sep 2004 15:33:11 -0400, jay+news@jay.fm suggested:
>: The Furman HDS-6 headphone distribution system uses CAT5 cable to carry
>: audio to the mic-stand receiver stations. CAT5 is annoyingly stiff and
>: doesn't like to coil up or lay out of the way, and probably isn't really
>: rugged enough to withstand constant moving, stepping, mic-stand
>: crushing, etc.
>:
>: Does anyone know of either (a) ultra-flexible CAT-5 that handles more
>: like braided audio cable, or (b) coil-cord CAT-5 like a telephone
>: receiver? I checked with igus, who make flexible cat-5, but theirs is
>: flexible as in "can be bent back and forth a lot without breaking",
>: not flexible as in limp-spaghetti.
>
>I think that the problem is that only stiff cable will work with the
>standard crimpers for putting the connectors on the end.

What you want is patch cord cable. It requires different connectors, but
the same crimp tools. Or just buy premade cat-5 patch cables from your local
Graybar.
--scott
--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
Anonymous
September 11, 2004 5:09:17 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Jay Levitt wrote:

> The Furman HDS-6 headphone distribution system uses CAT5 cable to carry
> audio to the mic-stand receiver stations. CAT5 is annoyingly stiff an
> doesn't like to coil up or lay out of the way, and probably isn't really
> rugged enough to withstand constant moving, stepping, mic-stand
> crushing, etc.
>
> Does anyone know of either (a) ultra-flexible CAT-5 that handles more
> like braided audio cable, or (b) coil-cord CAT-5 like a telephone
> receiver? I checked with igus, who make flexible cat-5, but theirs is
> flexible as in "can be bent back and forth a lot without breaking",
> not flexible as in limp-spaghetti.

OK, here's the deal. Category 5 is, of course, just an electrical
specification. As such, a Category 5 cable can be made out of
either solid or stranded wire, the latter being more flexible
(all other things being equal).

Also, to make things a little more complicated, network wiring
often needs to go through walls and ceilings. For this, you want
a thick, sturdy jacket that can withstand abuse AND is able to be
fished through walls and things, so the stronger the better, and
also, the stiffer the better. But another place where Category 5
cables run is through offices, under people's desks and things.
For this, you want something that lays down smoothly, turns corners,
etc., i.e. limp spaghetti.

There is cable is made for both purposes. What you want to do is
seek out cable that is made for patch cables rather than for pulling
through walls and ceilings. You want to avoid solid copper, and
you want to avoid anything with the word "plenum" in it. You want
to look for the words "patch" and "stranded".

Before I forget, there is an extra complication: The connectors
that you crimp at the ends come in two varieties. One variety
is designed to work with stranded wire and will not work properly
with solid. The other is the other way around. (I think you can
also get universal connectors that will work with either stranded
or solid.) So if you do make your own, pay attention to that
point or you may wind up making an inferior cable that is flaky.
As far as I know, both kinds of connectors work with a regular
crimping tool.

So that about covers copper and jackets, but there are also insulators
around those conductors in the cable. I don't know what's made of
what, but it's something else to be aware of.

Unfortunately, I can't give a specific recommendation, but I will
say that flexible stuff does exist. I have an old Cat 5 50ft. patch
cable that is as flexible as any normal cable and lays down easily.

If I were you, I'd go out to the nearest Fry's or whatever geeky
kind of computer parts store you have in your area, and have a look
at the bulk cable. If you know what you're looking for, you should
be able to find flexible stuff, because it does exist.

- Logan
Anonymous
September 11, 2004 8:33:27 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

>The Furman HDS-6 headphone distribution system uses CAT5 cable to carry
>
>audio to the mic-stand receiver stations. CAT5 is annoyingly stiff and
>
>doesn't like to coil up or lay out of the way, and probably isn't really
>
>rugged enough to withstand constant moving, stepping, mic-stand
>crushing, etc.>>

I've wrapped my cat-5 pairs in, what's it called, it looks like thin radiator
hose, split down the side, a flexible plastic cable gatherer. It isn't limp at
all, but the pairs are neatly organized.

Scott Fraser
Anonymous
September 13, 2004 7:38:28 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

>I've wrapped my cat-5 pairs in, what's it called, it looks like thin radiator
>hose, split down the side, a flexible plastic cable gatherer. It isn't limp
>at
>all, but the pairs are neatly organized.

I twisted mine together (tie one pair of cable ends around a mic stand and
twist with a cordless drill to make short work of it). You need to use a small
cable tie at each end to keep the pair from unraveling. I have no idea what
twisting does to the spec, but it keeps the cables together. It works fine for
my Furman HD6 boxes. I relace the ends every six months or so to avoid failure
during a session.


Joe Egan
EMP
Colchester, VT
www.eganmedia.com
Anonymous
September 13, 2004 10:45:04 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

> I've wrapped my cat-5 pairs in, what's it called, it looks like thin radiator
> hose, split down the side, a flexible plastic cable gatherer. It isn't limp at
> all, but the pairs are neatly organized.
>
> Scott Fraser

Split loom tubing. Good ol' All Electronics has it ($6 flat rate shipping).
!