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quiet PC gaming- the final frontier

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Anonymous
July 11, 2005 3:58:36 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.action (More info?)

Today I went out and bought a chipset heatsink to replace the one of my
northbridge, which has a whiney fan. Next I'm going to replace my GeForce
6800's noisy heatsink/fan setup (it's a BFG 6800 OC) with a Artic Cooling NV
5 silencer. I already have Vantec Stealth case fans, and the video card is
the noisiest part of my computer at the moment.

I simply don't understand why manufacturers don't design the hardware
quieter. Take the BFG card. It has two small 40 mm fans. 40mm fans are
always noisier than the bigger fans, but they use them anyways. It would be
nice to see hardware manufacturers make their stuff smarter, not just trying
to make it faster at all costs.
Anonymous
July 11, 2005 12:59:03 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.action (More info?)

"Magnulus" <magnulus@bellsouth.net> looked up from reading the entrails
of the porn spammer to utter "The Augury is good, the signs say:

> Today I went out and bought a chipset heatsink to replace the one of my
>northbridge, which has a whiney fan. Next I'm going to replace my GeForce
>6800's noisy heatsink/fan setup (it's a BFG 6800 OC) with a Artic Cooling NV
>5 silencer. I already have Vantec Stealth case fans, and the video card is
>the noisiest part of my computer at the moment.
>
> I simply don't understand why manufacturers don't design the hardware
>quieter. Take the BFG card. It has two small 40 mm fans. 40mm fans are
>always noisier than the bigger fans, but they use them anyways. It would be
>nice to see hardware manufacturers make their stuff smarter, not just trying
>to make it faster at all costs.

The thing is, the larger fans are also heavier and probably thinker as
well. I've seen some mighty thin 40mm fans, but 60 and 80mm types
always seem to be the standard case fan size.
Making the video card _much_ thicker would lose them sales to aLl of the
people who just don't have the space to fit one.

Then of course there's the cost of the better fans, and the fact that
they KNOW the public will happily buy a loudly cooled card.

Xocyll
--
I don't particularly want you to FOAD, myself. You'll be more of
a cautionary example if you'll FO And Get Chronically, Incurably,
Painfully, Progressively, Expensively, Debilitatingly Ill. So
FOAGCIPPEDI. -- Mike Andrews responding to an idiot in asr
Anonymous
July 11, 2005 3:10:21 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.action (More info?)

"Magnulus" <magnulus@bellsouth.net> wrote in message
news:E6mAe.54387$ho.2910@bignews6.bellsouth.net...
> Today I went out and bought a chipset heatsink to replace the one of my
> northbridge, which has a whiney fan. Next I'm going to replace my GeForce
> 6800's noisy heatsink/fan setup (it's a BFG 6800 OC) with a Artic Cooling
NV
> 5 silencer. I already have Vantec Stealth case fans, and the video card
is
> the noisiest part of my computer at the moment.
>
> I simply don't understand why manufacturers don't design the hardware
> quieter. Take the BFG card. It has two small 40 mm fans. 40mm fans are
> always noisier than the bigger fans, but they use them anyways. It would
be
> nice to see hardware manufacturers make their stuff smarter, not just
trying
> to make it faster at all costs.
>
>

What fan did you buy to replace your Northbridge cooler?
Related resources
Anonymous
July 11, 2005 3:35:33 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.action (More info?)

"Xocyll" <Xocyll@kingston.net> wrote in message
news:gk55d19grktdfsub1j75t5fsa2848hn4gq@4ax.com...
> The thing is, the larger fans are also heavier and probably thinker as
> well. I've seen some mighty thin 40mm fans, but 60 and 80mm types
> always seem to be the standard case fan size.
> Making the video card _much_ thicker would lose them sales to aLl of the
> people who just don't have the space to fit one.
>

You can't put a card right next to a video card anyways, so I really
don't see how space would be an issue. At least with the Artic Cooling
Silencers, they put that PCI slot to good use.
Anonymous
July 11, 2005 5:53:36 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.action (More info?)

Magnulus wrote:
> Today I went out and bought a chipset heatsink to replace the one of my
> northbridge, which has a whiney fan. Next I'm going to replace my GeForce
> 6800's noisy heatsink/fan setup (it's a BFG 6800 OC) with a Artic Cooling NV
> 5 silencer. I already have Vantec Stealth case fans, and the video card is
> the noisiest part of my computer at the moment.
>
> I simply don't understand why manufacturers don't design the hardware
> quieter. Take the BFG card. It has two small 40 mm fans. 40mm fans are
> always noisier than the bigger fans, but they use them anyways. It would be
> nice to see hardware manufacturers make their stuff smarter, not just trying
> to make it faster at all costs.

'cos it costs money, and people like thing cheap.

Beside, I don't care how loud it is because I wear noise-cancelling
headphones when gaming. WTF would I spend more money to silence
something I won't end up hearing in the first place?
July 11, 2005 5:53:37 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.action (More info?)

On Mon, 11 Jul 2005 13:53:36 +0930, GFree <gfree678@gmail.com> wrote:


>'cos it costs money, and people like thing cheap.
>
>Beside, I don't care how loud it is because I wear noise-cancelling
>headphones when gaming. WTF would I spend more money to silence
>something I won't end up hearing in the first place?

Speak for yourself you cheap SOB, some of us are willing to pay more
for quality. Here's something I came across today to make the cpu much
quieter.

http://www.hardwarexl.com/index.php?option=com_content&...
SCNJ-1000 "Ninja" Heatpipe CPU Cooler
Anonymous
July 11, 2005 5:53:37 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.action (More info?)

On Mon, 11 Jul 2005 13:53:36 +0930, GFree <gfree678@gmail.com> wrote:

>'cos it costs money, and people like thing cheap.
>
>Beside, I don't care how loud it is because I wear noise-cancelling
>headphones when gaming. WTF would I spend more money to silence
>something I won't end up hearing in the first place?

Well, you already spent more money not to hear things when you bought
the headphones.
July 11, 2005 5:53:38 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.action (More info?)

"Fisher" <fisher@no_email.here> wrote in message
news:4254d1lmtodamtnvne31gj91783umvu7lm@4ax.com...
> On Mon, 11 Jul 2005 13:53:36 +0930, GFree <gfree678@gmail.com> wrote:
>
>
>>'cos it costs money, and people like thing cheap.
>>
>>Beside, I don't care how loud it is because I wear noise-cancelling
>>headphones when gaming. WTF would I spend more money to silence
>>something I won't end up hearing in the first place?
>
> Speak for yourself you cheap SOB, some of us are willing to pay more
> for quality. Here's something I came across today to make the cpu much
> quieter.
>
> http://www.hardwarexl.com/index.php?option=com_content&...
> SCNJ-1000 "Ninja" Heatpipe CPU Cooler

you really want the weight of that thing pulling at the CPU socket ?
Anonymous
July 11, 2005 5:53:38 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.action (More info?)

Panasonic makes a good pair of noise cancelling headphones that don't
cost much.

The only problem with noise cancelling headphones- they don't completely
work, especially on the fan noise PC's can make. They work better on low
frequency sounds, which are sounds that 40 and 60mm fans tend not to make.
Anonymous
July 11, 2005 5:53:38 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.action (More info?)

I bought a Mad Dog Powerchill Copper CPU heatsink:
http://www.mdmm.net/products/techietoyz/cpuvgacooling.a...

It works very well, about 10 degrees C cooler than the stock AMD heatsink
for the Athlon XP's, and of course the fan is a low rotation/low noise
variety.

I think just ditching a thermal pad and using some Arctic Silver for most
people would lower CPU temperatures quite a bit.

You also have to watch heatsinks that are made out of more than a few
pieces- they tend to not work as well as a solid piece of metal. At one
time I had an Antec CPU cooler that had a 60mm fan, a copper bottom, but the
fins were aluminum, and they were pretty much just pressed against the
copper base. The cooler was quieter than stock, but the heat was a little
higher. I think it's because the contact was not as perfect as a solid
piece of metal would be.
July 11, 2005 5:53:39 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.action (More info?)

On Mon, 11 Jul 2005 08:02:51 GMT, "Sleepy"
<bpespleyremovetheobvious@blueyonder.co.uk> wrote:


>you really want the weight of that thing pulling at the CPU socket ?
>
Weight: 665g

450g is the recommended max weight so it's not much above that spec.
I've seen HSF's that weigh more - like the Coolermaster Hyper HSF's. I
think 665g is doable and I may buy one if I can find one to buy
locally.
Anonymous
July 11, 2005 6:10:26 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.action (More info?)

"Magnulus" <magnulus@bellsouth.net> looked up from reading the entrails
of the porn spammer to utter "The Augury is good, the signs say:

>
>"Xocyll" <Xocyll@kingston.net> wrote in message
>news:gk55d19grktdfsub1j75t5fsa2848hn4gq@4ax.com...
>> The thing is, the larger fans are also heavier and probably thinker as
>> well. I've seen some mighty thin 40mm fans, but 60 and 80mm types
>> always seem to be the standard case fan size.
>> Making the video card _much_ thicker would lose them sales to aLl of the
>> people who just don't have the space to fit one.
>>
>
> You can't put a card right next to a video card anyways, so I really
>don't see how space would be an issue.

The thing is, once you add a much thicker fan you've got a good chance
of not being able to put a card in the next _two_ slots in order to
still have airflow, and that could be a major issue on some motherboards
with very few slots.
A standard 80mm fan is how much thicker than the 40mm fans they put on
video cards?
[Looking at the card on BFGs website, i'd guess twice as thick at
least.]
Not to mention it would be heavier, requiring more substantial mounting.

Sure it could be done, but would enough people want it to make it
profitable to design and make?

Xocyll
--
I don't particularly want you to FOAD, myself. You'll be more of
a cautionary example if you'll FO And Get Chronically, Incurably,
Painfully, Progressively, Expensively, Debilitatingly Ill. So
FOAGCIPPEDI. -- Mike Andrews responding to an idiot in asr
Anonymous
July 11, 2005 8:58:43 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.action (More info?)

I got an Antec Sonata Piano case for my latest comp and I strongly
recommend it to anyone. Mostly for the temperature-regulated power
supply fan, which makes an enormous difference in noise.
Anonymous
July 11, 2005 9:15:03 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.action (More info?)

"bioderm" <shavolsky@ladavisky.com> wrote in message
news:11d5dg15g23kda5@corp.supernews.com...
> What fan did you buy to replace your Northbridge cooler?

I didn't use a fan. I bought a tall blue anondized aluminum chipset
heatsink (I believe it's a Coolermaster branded one). The old one was just
taped on with thermal tape and I worked it off. Then I put some thermal
tape on the bottom of the heatsink, and I put a little superglue on the
sides of the chip (on the plastic parts), and I let it cure for about an
hour, and it worked great.

Once I get my VGA Silencer, I'm going to experiment with running with only
the power supply as an exhaust. If it's too hot, I might run with one rear
case fan. I'm also going to look for hard disk silencers (Zalman makes a
heat pipe setup that's also suppossed to reduce noise, it might be
interesting, as it would both cool and quiet the drives).
Anonymous
July 12, 2005 1:43:03 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.action (More info?)

Hi,

In article <liBAe.70432$du.32791@bignews1.bellsouth.net>,
Magnulus <magnulus@bellsouth.net> wrote:
#Once I get my VGA Silencer, I'm going to experiment with running with only
#the power supply as an exhaust.

That's a good way to cook the power supply. Also, take a look PC Power &
Cooling's web site, at the effect of heat on power supply efficiency.

#If it's too hot, I might run with one rear case fan.

You'd be better off with one input fan, either in the front or in the
side. Cut out any stamped intake grill or other obstruction for the
input fan. Leave the rear fan position wide-open. The positive pressure
from the input fan will take some of the heat load off the power supply
by venting hot air from other places.

# I'm also going to look for hard disk silencers (Zalman makes a
#heat pipe setup that's also suppossed to reduce noise, it might be
#interesting, as it would both cool and quiet the drives).

Disks don't need heat pipes unless you're running 10K or 15K RPM disks
constantly 24/7, or your cooling solution is really botched.

Rubber grommets can do the job cheaper. I also use Plasti-Dip on the
case or frame where I mount fans and disks. It really dampens vibrations
and acts as a gasket to prevent buzzes. It is available as a spray or a
can of dip/paint.

You won't find these techniques advertised much because they don't
prop-up the computer mail order industry, or buy lots of ad space in
glossy magazines.

Ken.
--
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mail: kmarsh at charm dot net | Fire Rumsfeld, secure Iraq's borders.
WWW: http://www.charm.net/~kmarsh | Our border with Mexico too.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
Anonymous
July 12, 2005 1:43:04 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.action (More info?)

AMD recommends one rear exhaust fan. I have never heard them recommend
just an intake fan. The idea of positive pressure cooling a PC is
controversial, although that is pretty much how Intel's BTX cases work (only
exhaust is in the power supply).
Anonymous
July 12, 2005 1:46:20 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.action (More info?)

Hi,

In article <42d1f43e_1@news.iprimus.com.au>, GFree <gfree678@gmail.com> wrote:
#Magnulus wrote:
#> I simply don't understand why manufacturers don't design the hardware
#> quieter. Take the BFG card. It has two small 40 mm fans. 40mm fans are
#> always noisier than the bigger fans, but they use them anyways. It would be
#> nice to see hardware manufacturers make their stuff smarter, not just trying
#> to make it faster at all costs.

#'cos it costs money, and people like thing cheap.

???

I very much doubt 2x40mm fans are cheaper than one 60, 70 or 80mm fan.

#Beside, I don't care how loud it is because I wear noise-cancelling
#headphones when gaming. WTF would I spend more money to silence
#something I won't end up hearing in the first place?

gFree, I suppose you actually like wearing headgear? Not my way to
relax. Are they 5.1 or 7.1? How much did they cost?

Ken.
--
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mail: kmarsh at charm dot net | Fire Rumsfeld, secure Iraq's borders.
WWW: http://www.charm.net/~kmarsh | Our border with Mexico too.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
July 12, 2005 1:55:55 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.action (More info?)

On Mon, 11 Jul 2005 09:23:31 -0400, "Magnulus"
<magnulus@bellsouth.net> wrote:

> I bought a Mad Dog Powerchill Copper CPU heatsink:
>http://www.mdmm.net/products/techietoyz/cpuvgacooling.a...
>
> It works very well, about 10 degrees C cooler than the stock AMD heatsink
>for the Athlon XP's, and of course the fan is a low rotation/low noise
>variety.
>
> I think just ditching a thermal pad and using some Arctic Silver for most
>people would lower CPU temperatures quite a bit.
>
> You also have to watch heatsinks that are made out of more than a few
>pieces- they tend to not work as well as a solid piece of metal. At one
>time I had an Antec CPU cooler that had a 60mm fan, a copper bottom, but the
>fins were aluminum, and they were pretty much just pressed against the
>copper base. The cooler was quieter than stock, but the heat was a little
>higher. I think it's because the contact was not as perfect as a solid
>piece of metal would be.
>

I want fanless for my cpu and vid card though so heatpipes is the way
to go for me. I don't want watercooling. Aluminum dissipates heat
better but copper conducts heat better and that is why you are seeing
some HSF's that are using hybrid designs of both copper core and
aluminum fins.
July 12, 2005 2:02:55 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.action (More info?)

On Mon, 11 Jul 2005 11:10:21 -0700, "bioderm"
<shavolsky@ladavisky.com> wrote:


>What fan did you buy to replace your Northbridge cooler?
>

You don't need a fan if you get one of these.

http://www.zalman.co.kr/

click on Northbridge chipset coolers
Anonymous
July 12, 2005 5:05:11 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.action (More info?)

"Magnulus" <magnulus@bellsouth.net> writes:

> I simply don't understand why manufacturers don't design the hardware
> quieter.

I take it you mean why more manufacturers don't design the hardware
quieter? I suppose it's not a selling point. But there are quiet
components. For example, I recently replaced my fanless Radeon 9600
pro (Sapphire) with a fanless 6600 GT (Gigabyte). A little earlier, I
got a fanless PSU (Etasis). I don't think I ever bought a motherboard
with a fan.

So, remaining noise sources? CPU fan, two case fans, three HDs. I'll
probably get rid of one of the HDs next and hopefully the other case
fan can go too.
Anonymous
July 12, 2005 7:02:29 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.action (More info?)

On Mon, 11 Jul 2005 19:38:34 -0400, "Magnulus"
<magnulus@bellsouth.net> wrote:

> AMD recommends one rear exhaust fan. I have never heard them recommend
>just an intake fan. The idea of positive pressure cooling a PC is
>controversial, although that is pretty much how Intel's BTX cases work (only
>exhaust is in the power supply).
>
>

Yeah, typical Intel... they don't build power-supplies, but are quite
happy to warm them doubly by both the power-consumption and the
resultant excess heat from their woefully inefficient series of
dual-core desktop processors. I pity the capacitors in the power
supply.

John Lewis
July 12, 2005 9:23:49 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.action (More info?)

"Anssi Saari" <as@sci.fi> wrote in message
news:vg37jfxt2w8.fsf@jolt.modeemi.cs.tut.fi...
> "Magnulus" <magnulus@bellsouth.net> writes:
>
>> I simply don't understand why manufacturers don't design the hardware
>> quieter.
>
> I take it you mean why more manufacturers don't design the hardware
> quieter? I suppose it's not a selling point. But there are quiet
> components. For example, I recently replaced my fanless Radeon 9600
> pro (Sapphire) with a fanless 6600 GT (Gigabyte). A little earlier, I
> got a fanless PSU (Etasis). I don't think I ever bought a motherboard
> with a fan.
>
> So, remaining noise sources? CPU fan, two case fans, three HDs. I'll
> probably get rid of one of the HDs next and hopefully the other case
> fan can go too.

I have done a some experimenting and research to make my PC's quiet. I
needed a quiet PC so I don't keep my wife awake late at night while gaming
or downloading, but also I just like having it quiet when I use it.
I think the key is managing the airflow efficiently and good heat
transfer(heatsinks). A larger fan can run at slower (and quieter) speeds and
move the same amount of air and more efficient heat sinks need less air
flow.
Some PC cases do not have the room for larger fans and good air flow so you
might be limited on how much you can change it to make it quieter.
I built my gaming PC from scratch last spring and picked components that I
thought would be as quiet as possible and still good performance.
This is my system:
Case- Antec P160 (for its large vents and fan openings and air flow over
the hard drives. I modified it by opening the vents even more and lining the
inside with sound absorbing material.)

Case fan- (yes just one fan in the case) 120mm fan (set to exhaust out the
back at 1200-1600rpm variable. Don't be fooled by fans that are advertised
as stealth or claim to be quiet. Also most reviews are very subjective)

PSU- Coolmax 400w CX-400B with 120mm fan (very quiet, helps flow the air out
case good and only $35)

MB- Asus K8V Deluxe with 2GB Corsair XMS. (no fan needed on VIA chip)

CPU- Athlon 64 3400 with Zalman HSF #CNPS7000A-CU RT (CPU good performance
and not a lot of heat. Fan is at 1300-1500rpm and very quiet)

Graphics-ATI X800XT PE with Arctic Cooler (very quiet and blows hot air out
back to keep nearby cards cooler)

Sound- SB Audigy 2

DVD-ROM LiteOn 16x (one) (a bit noisy when in use.)
DVD+/-RW NEC (one) (also noisy when in use.)

HD- Samsung SpinPoint 160GB (two drives in RAID 0) (very quiet drives and I
also mounted the on sorbathane rubber to make them silent).


I can run this PC at normal temperature and performance settings (ATI card
in overdrive setting) and its very quiet. At idle its no louder than a VCR
or my Tivo unit. Under load it only gets a little bit louder as the fans
speed up only a couple hundred rpm.

Oh and my headphones are the Zalman ZM-RS6F 5.1 surround sound. A bit big,
but work good for gaming with true surround sound and only $50.


Lou
Anonymous
July 12, 2005 1:47:43 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.action (More info?)

Tim O wrote:
> On Mon, 11 Jul 2005 13:53:36 +0930, GFree <gfree678@gmail.com> wrote:
>
>
>>'cos it costs money, and people like thing cheap.
>>
>>Beside, I don't care how loud it is because I wear noise-cancelling
>>headphones when gaming. WTF would I spend more money to silence
>>something I won't end up hearing in the first place?
>
>
> Well, you already spent more money not to hear things when you bought
> the headphones.

*stares blankly*

I live in a place where I don't want to disturbe the other occupants.
That means headphones, moderately priced.
Anonymous
July 12, 2005 1:49:04 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.action (More info?)

Ken Marsh wrote:
> Hi,
>
> In article <42d1f43e_1@news.iprimus.com.au>, GFree <gfree678@gmail.com> wrote:
> #Magnulus wrote:
> #> I simply don't understand why manufacturers don't design the hardware
> #> quieter. Take the BFG card. It has two small 40 mm fans. 40mm fans are
> #> always noisier than the bigger fans, but they use them anyways. It would be
> #> nice to see hardware manufacturers make their stuff smarter, not just trying
> #> to make it faster at all costs.
>
> #'cos it costs money, and people like thing cheap.
>
> ???
>
> I very much doubt 2x40mm fans are cheaper than one 60, 70 or 80mm fan.
>
> #Beside, I don't care how loud it is because I wear noise-cancelling
> #headphones when gaming. WTF would I spend more money to silence
> #something I won't end up hearing in the first place?
>
> gFree, I suppose you actually like wearing headgear? Not my way to
> relax. Are they 5.1 or 7.1? How much did they cost?

You can get used to anything Ken. Don't let anyone tell you otherwise.
Now I don't even notice the weight of the 'phones, and they certainly
make things quieter in the house. They're stereo and cost the equivalent
of US$25 (probably a bad comparison cos I'm not in the US).
Anonymous
July 12, 2005 5:46:38 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.action (More info?)

In article <42d30c6e_1@news.iprimus.com.au>, GFree <gfree678@gmail.com> wrote:
#You can get used to anything Ken. Don't let anyone tell you otherwise.

One of the definitions of intelligent life, is that it adapts its
environment to suit itself. :) 

After 6 ~months of a noisy, high-end gaming PC, I changed it to a very
quiet, high-end gaming PC. The total cost was around $75, the largest
part of which was for the Zalman VGA cooler. (The rest was for
Panaflo's, some dremel cut-off wheels, and a round cable.) Every time I
switch on a loud machine at work, I want to do the same to it.

I wear a headphone/mike at work not quite daily, but definitely weekly,
when I have driving duties. The are a PITA and I have no intention of
adapting to them at home. If everyone else is asleep, I just move the
5.1's closer and turn the volume down.

Ken.
--
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mail: kmarsh at charm dot net | Fire Rumsfeld, secure Iraq's borders.
WWW: http://www.charm.net/~kmarsh | Our border with Mexico too.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
Anonymous
July 12, 2005 5:48:43 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.action (More info?)

In article <ToDAe.50524$qm.42964@bignews5.bellsouth.net>,
Magnulus <magnulus@bellsouth.net> wrote:
# AMD recommends one rear exhaust fan. I have never heard them recommend
#just an intake fan.

I don't recommend just an input fan. There's still the power supply fan.

# The idea of positive pressure cooling a PC is
#controversial, although that is pretty much how Intel's BTX cases work (only
#exhaust is in the power supply).

Intel's ATX spec requires cooling holes in the side panels, which makes
cooling by positive pressure alone problematic in a typical midi-tower.

Ken.
--
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mail: kmarsh at charm dot net | Fire Rumsfeld, secure Iraq's borders.
WWW: http://www.charm.net/~kmarsh | Our border with Mexico too.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
July 12, 2005 7:50:22 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.action (More info?)

"Lou" <NospamLou@nospam.net> wrote in message
news:FtIAe.3904$p%3.24052@typhoon.sonic.net...
>
>"snip"
> I built my gaming PC from scratch last spring and picked components that I
> thought would be as quiet as possible and still good performance.
> This is my system:
> Case- Antec P160 (for its large vents and fan openings and air flow over
> the hard drives. I modified it by opening the vents even more and lining
> the inside with sound absorbing material.)
>
> Case fan- (yes just one fan in the case) 120mm fan (set to exhaust out the
> back at 1200-1600rpm variable. Don't be fooled by fans that are advertised
> as stealth or claim to be quiet. Also most reviews are very subjective)
>
> PSU- Coolmax 400w CX-400B with 120mm fan (very quiet, helps flow the air
> out case good and only $35)
>
> MB- Asus K8V Deluxe with 2GB Corsair XMS. (no fan needed on VIA chip)
>
> CPU- Athlon 64 3400 with Zalman HSF #CNPS7000A-CU RT (CPU good performance
> and not a lot of heat. Fan is at 1300-1500rpm and very quiet)
>
> Graphics-ATI X800XT PE with Arctic Cooler (very quiet and blows hot air
> out back to keep nearby cards cooler)
>
> Sound- SB Audigy 2
>
> DVD-ROM LiteOn 16x (one) (a bit noisy when in use.)
> DVD+/-RW NEC (one) (also noisy when in use.)
>
> HD- Samsung SpinPoint 160GB (two drives in RAID 0) (very quiet drives and
> I also mounted the on sorbathane rubber to make them silent).
>
>
> I can run this PC at normal temperature and performance settings (ATI card
> in overdrive setting) and its very quiet. At idle its no louder than a VCR
> or my Tivo unit. Under load it only gets a little bit louder as the fans
> speed up only a couple hundred rpm.
>
> Oh and my headphones are the Zalman ZM-RS6F 5.1 surround sound. A bit big,
> but work good for gaming with true surround sound and only $50.
>
>
> Lou
>
>

Some links to quiet PC stuff

http://www.silentpcreview.com/

http://silent.gumph.org/content/3/12/044-basics.html

http://www.cpemma.co.uk/

http://www.silent.se/

http://www.acoustiproducts.com/en/index.asp

http://www.siliconacoustics.com/

http://www.muffledcomputing.com/

http://www.mcmaster.com/ Most of the sound absorbing materials, sorbathane
rubber for HD and rubber fan mounts can be bought here at a lot less cost.

Lou
Anonymous
July 21, 2005 11:07:10 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.action (More info?)

The only reason my PC sounds like a jet engine is because I need my Tornado
92mm fan to allow maximum overclocking potential. Watercooling would be an
alternative I guess, but I don't have the time or money for that.

--
there is no .sig
"Magnulus" <magnulus@bellsouth.net> wrote in message
news:RdBAe.70430$du.61544@bignews1.bellsouth.net...
>
> The bottom line is people spend lots of money to get the fastest
> hardware-
> no matter what, and they never stop and think about the noise. There is
> simply no reason that PC hardware needs to be as noisy as it is. I've
> seen
> far too many PC's that sound like jet engines, and people think this is
> just
> normal. There's no other piece of home electronics that's as noisy as a
> PC.
> Even gaming consoles are designed to be quiet.
>
>
>
!