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Is my router dying?

Last response: in Networking
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September 27, 2012 11:44:35 AM

Hello, My router seems to be dying. Is it really?

First off, it's not the ISP's fault. Direct modem connection is perfect. It's a 5mbps connection

Here are some symptoms:
Pinging 192.168.1.1 would yield some spikes of 2500ms +++ pings and Request Timed Out's
(Pinged using Wireless and also LAN cable Ethernet)

Loading websites can sometimes be instant(5mbps connection) but sometimes takes as slow as a Dial up connection and sometimes even times out. I blame the router

It often bugs out and I need to restart it 3-4 times a day. I really don't like this part.

Most of the times the internet gets choppy. Some programs don't like choppy internet like Steam, It will error if there is a single RTO.

Is my router really dying?

How is this router: Cisco E2500, It's the only one within budget

More about : router dying

September 27, 2012 2:30:04 PM

Yup, sounds like your router could certainly be the problem. The E2500 is a good router if you need dual band N.
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September 29, 2012 4:44:50 AM

RealBeast said:
Yup, sounds like your router could certainly be the problem. The E2500 is a good router if you need dual band N.


I'm sorry for the late reply, catching up for a lot of school work. Anyway, what are the advantages of dual band anyway? It just sounded high tech, and thats why I wanted that and not the E1200. I have a WAP54G Linksys Access point here, and when its on it usually messes things up. So I never have it on anymore, even if wifi is quite short downstairs. Does dual band increase the wifi range so I dont have to buy a new access point as well?
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September 29, 2012 1:56:56 PM

Dual band is only helpful if it is simultaneous dual band (more expensive) and your devices have compatible adapters, which is very unlikely. An E1200 would be a great choice.

The problem with your WAP54G may just be the settings. Once you get the new router, I would try resetting the AP to see if it still works. Give the AP an IP address in the network range that is not used by anything else -- the easiest way is address reservation, use same SSID and passphrase as main router, and use a non-overlapping radio channel from the main router, so choose among 1, 6 and 11 for the two devices.
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September 30, 2012 1:24:58 AM

RealBeast said:
I just noticed that Newegg has a real good price on the E1550, $40 free shipping and it is basically the same router as the E1200 that is $5 more: www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E1683312447...


My cousin uses the E1200, and I really don't like his review on it. He's had it changed twice. Apparently the WiFi just dies, like the antenna breaks down or something when too many people use it. So I think I'm sticking with the E2500, unless you know of any bad reviews about it. My cousin (another one) is gonna give me a router for my birthday, because I'm pissed about ours. Anyway, they've been using a D-Link and they haven't ever had these problems. We have the same ISP, and we're both 5mbps. But I was thinking a D-Link might conflict with some stuff here. Honestly, my computer's antenna is a D-Link, but my brother's is a Linksys. Mine can work with the linksys, I'm just not sure how my brother's will adapt to the new router.

So playing safe, do you have any knowledge of bad reviews of the E2500?
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September 30, 2012 2:51:28 PM

No, the E2500 is a good router (better than the 1200 or 1550 IMO). My current home networks use 5 D Link DIR-655 units, two as routers and the rest as access points. Different brands work together fine if they are support same standards. One advantage of the E2500 is that it is dual band simultaneous -- so if you get dual band or 5GHz adapters for you devices you can leave the 2.4GHz band free for miscellaneous connections. Recall that if any device connects to your 2.4GHz N radio as a G device, all 2.4GHz devices will default down to G; also G has a lot more interference from other networks, wireless phones, headphones, and speakers, baby monitors, microwave ovens, etc.

Every consumer grade router available that I am aware of will experience dropped wireless connection when you reach around 10 or so users -- while they all support hundreds of connections, the radio systems are not robust enough for very many users. There are ways to solve that issue if you expect that problem, which involve multiple access points or commercial quality APs that can get expensive fast depending on the number of connections you need.
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October 1, 2012 9:11:51 AM

RealBeast said:
No, the E2500 is a good router (better than the 1200 or 1550 IMO). My current home networks use 5 D Link DIR-655 units, two as routers and the rest as access points. Different brands work together fine if they are support same standards. One advantage of the E2500 is that it is dual band simultaneous -- so if you get dual band or 5GHz adapters for you devices you can leave the 2.4GHz band free for miscellaneous connections. Recall that if any device connects to your 2.4GHz N radio as a G device, all 2.4GHz devices will default down to G; also G has a lot more interference from other networks, wireless phones, headphones, and speakers, baby monitors, microwave ovens, etc.

Every consumer grade router available that I am aware of will experience dropped wireless connection when you reach around 10 or so users -- while they all support hundreds of connections, the radio systems are not robust enough for very many users. There are ways to solve that issue if you expect that problem, which involve multiple access points or commercial quality APs that can get expensive fast depending on the number of connections you need.


Well, Our house very very very rarely has even close to 10 people using WiFi at the same time. Also interesting, could the "G" thing you're talking about be the problem? I remember that option, and I put it to "Mixed". Should I make it B only or maybe even Disabled? I also ran around the house with my tablet's WiFi analyzer, and all my neighbors used 1, 3 and 11. So I use 13, and no single soul uses it also. Besides, there aren't that many people around my house since my neighbors' lots are like 5 meters away from my house lot, not considering WiFi blockage via walls.

About the E2500, our house isn't very techie, so I don't think we have any 5 G Hz devices. I was really considering interference as a main problem, but even direct LAN cables still screw up. My router is really dying, and I can accept that. But is there any reason I shouldn't get the E2500? Like some features I'm paying good money for yet I wont probably ever use in the near future? But for me, It's the average router, that doesn't have bad reviews. I just really really want a DEPENDABLE router. Not something that screws up 5 times a day.

If you really say diff. brands work together then here are the devices in my house:
iPhone 4
iPhone 3GS
2 Nokia's (WiFi capable - My brother's horrible phone, My dad's touchscreen Nokia both hardly EVER uses wifi)
2 Samsung Tablets (School eBooks)
2 working laptops (2 Toshiba's, one is ancient. The other is a satellite, my brother uses it often)
My WiFi Antenna D - Link AirPlus G DWL-G510 Wireless PCI Adapter(rev. C)
My Brother's WiFi Antenna Linksys Wireless G PCI Adapter ( I know, quite vague, that's all it says. Anyway, it's a PCI card and it's default antenna is like 5 or 6 inches long)
My brother's friend's laptop (Some MSI gaming laptop, This is like what... 2 or 3 times a month? Not very often)

Anything gonna conflict with the E2500? Both antenna's say Wireless G, what does that mean?

I thought of a few things that might be conflicting. I only listed items that were around when all this *** started.
2 Cordless Landlines (Both Panasonic KX-TGA710CX)
TV remotes
Microwave (It's downstairs in the kitchen, so meh. Probably not the reason because it's so far. Don't think WiFi even reaches the kitchen.)
That's all I can think of.

But honestly, I'm sick and tired of this ancient router. So yeah, I'm getting the E2500 unless there are any objections, suggestions. I'll try to not be biased towards Linksys, so throw all your suggests at me. I'd say the most expensive I'd go is $100 (Not sure about the prices here, but I only made it in $$$ so you guys can relate. My real currency is Philippine PESO which is Php 43 : $1.)

Again, sorry for the late reply, got school *** to do.
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October 1, 2012 9:28:01 AM

RealBeast said:
No, the E2500 is a good router (better than the 1200 or 1550 IMO). My current home networks use 5 D Link DIR-655 units, two as routers and the rest as access points. Different brands work together fine if they are support same standards. One advantage of the E2500 is that it is dual band simultaneous -- so if you get dual band or 5GHz adapters for you devices you can leave the 2.4GHz band free for miscellaneous connections. Recall that if any device connects to your 2.4GHz N radio as a G device, all 2.4GHz devices will default down to G; also G has a lot more interference from other networks, wireless phones, headphones, and speakers, baby monitors, microwave ovens, etc.

Every consumer grade router available that I am aware of will experience dropped wireless connection when you reach around 10 or so users -- while they all support hundreds of connections, the radio systems are not robust enough for very many users. There are ways to solve that issue if you expect that problem, which involve multiple access points or commercial quality APs that can get expensive fast depending on the number of connections you need.


Ok, so I also found that were I live I found Linksys AE1000 USB WiFi Antenna's for sale @ less than $30 (or Php 1,150).

So, I thought, if I'm upgrading my router, why not upgrade that one too? It's pretty cheap. It's just I've never tried USB Antenna's and I don't know if AE1000 is reliable either. Oh and, my local retailer also sells an AE2500, It's for $40 though but it's capable of 5Ghz so I can eliminate interference. Oh and if I use 5Ghz, what happens to visitors that come with only 2.4Ghz devices? They can also use it right? If I do buy the E2500 Dual Band? Because I also have a problem with WiFi signal, and I hate access points, gaaaahhhhh I've had enough of those, and probably will never get one again. So yeah, AE1000 or AE2500?
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October 1, 2012 9:55:54 AM

Ok so, reviews of both adapters say that it bugs up when sleeping and stuff, so I don't think I'll go for those USB thingies.
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October 1, 2012 2:19:16 PM

Sleep is an issue with many devices, I never use it, instead I just set the monitors to power down in a short time.

If you get a simultaneous dual band router (E2500) that adapter would be excellent (USB adapters are generally very good), because none of the 2.4GHz signal would affect you. Just turn off the sleep/hibernate modes and customize your power settings to save where possible, especially with monitors.

Channel 13 overlaps with channel 11 -- since you are outside the US the best channel set is 1, 5, 9 and 13. Use the ones that show the least and weakest signals on your test program.

Wireless G and wireless N both use 2.4GHz band, only the dual part of N uses 5GHz (so it is much less used and less interference). The problem is that most adapters still only use 2.4GHz band.

Don't use B only, and with all those devices you need to keep a mixed G and N environment, as some probably do not have N compatible adapters. The only downside is that all devices connected end up defaulting to G if there are G devices accessing the network. Anything that supports 5GHz N should be set to only use that as it will releive congestion on your network and speed the connection for those using 5GHz.

And with a poor router, even 5-6 connected devices can be an issue, so a new router like the 2500 should help.
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October 1, 2012 2:53:22 PM

RealBeast said:
Sleep is an issue with many devices, I never use it, instead I just set the monitors to power down in a short time.

If you get a simultaneous dual band router (E2500) that adapter would be excellent (USB adapters are generally very good), because none of the 2.4GHz signal would affect you. Just turn off the sleep/hibernate modes and customize your power settings to save where possible, especially with monitors.

Channel 13 overlaps with channel 11 -- since you are outside the US the best channel set is 1, 5, 9 and 13. Use the ones that show the least and weakest signals on your test program.

Wireless G and wireless N both use 2.4GHz band, only the dual part of N uses 5GHz (so it is much less used and less interference). The problem is that most adapters still only use 2.4GHz band.

Don't use B only, and with all those devices you need to keep a mixed G and N environment, as some probably do not have N compatible adapters. The only downside is that all devices connected end up defaulting to G if there are G devices accessing the network. Anything that supports 5GHz N should be set to only use that as it will releive congestion on your network and speed the connection for those using 5GHz.

And with a poor router, even 5-6 connected devices can be an issue, so a new router like the 2500 should help.


First of all, There are NO OTHER WiFi sources using Channel 13. The closest is one guy using channel 11. But he has VERY weak signal, like i only get it from the window.

The USB adapters are a long shot, since it's hard enough asking my parents for a new router. I will try with my own money. But from what I've read, 1 out of 2 reviews are always bad. And I only have a choice between AE1200 and AE2500. Plus, I need 2 of them. But honestly, can we eliminate WiFi interference from neighbors, because my house is a legit house, and my neighbors are quite far let's say 10 meters from my house's walls. So let's elminate that, with out any other 2.4GHz sources, do I REALLY need to buy new USB adapters JUST FOR the 5GHz capability to match that of the E2500?

I'm really looking into the E2500 for a few things:
> Modern, Improved <
> Better Technology <
Faster Speeds
> Longer Range <
> Better load capacity <
Future-Proofing

I think of 5GHz as future-proofing. So anyway, if my E2500 is at 300mbps does my WiFi adapter limit it?
Do both Router AND WiFi adapter need to have speeds of 300mbps for it to actually work? Does the 300mbps even affect
my internet speed? My real question is, Do WiFi adapters also have speed ratings like 300mbps? And if so,
is the 300mbps of my E2500 useless?
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October 1, 2012 4:41:44 PM

"do I REALLY need to buy new USB adapters JUST FOR the 5GHz capability to match that of the E2500? " No, but then why buy 5GHz capability in the first place if you will never use it? By the time that it will future proof anything the standard will be 802.11ac running on the 5GHz band at much faster speeds ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IEEE_802.11ac ).

"So anyway, if my E2500 is at 300mbps does my WiFi adapter limit it? " You will not achieve anywhere near 300Mbps unless you are using all wireless N devices on the network, any G devices will default it to 54Mbps -- also you must use AES security on all devices to get over 54Mbps.

Check prices on the DLink DIR-655 routers, it is single band at 2.4GHz with gigabit Ethernet ports and has excellent range -- as good as any 2.4GHz router I have ever tested and I use a number of them as APs. I expect that they will be cheaper than the E2500 and will perform just as well in actual use since you have a mixed G/N network, actually mostly G.
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October 2, 2012 8:46:55 AM

RealBeast said:
"do I REALLY need to buy new USB adapters JUST FOR the 5GHz capability to match that of the E2500? " No, but then why buy 5GHz capability in the first place if you will never use it? By the time that it will future proof anything the standard will be 802.11ac running on the 5GHz band at much faster speeds ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IEEE_802.11ac ).

"So anyway, if my E2500 is at 300mbps does my WiFi adapter limit it? " You will not achieve anywhere near 300Mbps unless you are using all wireless N devices on the network, any G devices will default it to 54Mbps -- also you must use AES security on all devices to get over 54Mbps.

Check prices on the DLink DIR-655 routers, it is single band at 2.4GHz with gigabit Ethernet ports and has excellent range -- as good as any 2.4GHz router I have ever tested and I use a number of them as APs. I expect that they will be cheaper than the E2500 and will perform just as well in actual use since you have a mixed G/N network, actually mostly G.


I guess I will have to get USB adapters then. Which one? AE1200 or AE2500? That's still on the drawing board. Right now, I really just need a new router. And knowing my parents, If I screw up they won't get me a new one any time soon. So yeah, I'll get the E2500 for future-proofing purposes, and because I need a god damn new router.

I do have a few questions, Most of my dad's not so new and all of them are connected via LAN CABLE. It's not ancient, the slowest is a Pentium I think. Anyway, does the Ethernet plug have a speed limit too? Or it can use whatever speed the router has? At the moment it's only 100mbps, and I think it's the router. But anyway, we only have 2 computers that actively use LAN, one is quite new actually newer than mine but not as upgraded as my rig and still XP. The other one is not so new and also using XP. So far that one is the slowest. I was just asking if they could also benefit from the speed boost?
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