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How do you say Neumann? a poll

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Anonymous
September 12, 2004 10:23:18 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Gringo style or the real way

feel free to type it phonetically

More about : neumann poll

Anonymous
September 13, 2004 5:34:54 AM

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"TYY" <tyler@dhiw.com> wrote in message
> Gringo style or the real way
>
> feel free to type it phonetically

Here we go again. What about Neutrik while we're at it?
Anonymous
September 13, 2004 5:34:55 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

>
> Here we go again. What about Neutrik while we're at it?


My intent was not to debate or educate, but to take a poll. How many
native english speakers say "new-mun" how many say "noy-mon"?

I say porsh-a, but for some reason I still say newmun U87 despite
knowing better. Just curious to know if I'm the only gringo here.
Related resources
Anonymous
September 13, 2004 7:03:25 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"TYY" <tyler@dhiw.com> wrote in message
news:b6b7a391.0409121723.4117f08c@posting.google.com...
> Gringo style or the real way
>
> feel free to type it phonetically

It's "Noy", but if you were to say "New", people would still know what you
meant (but would probably just refer to you as: "that guy who can't say
'Neumann' right").

:D 
--


Neil Henderson
Saqqara Records
http://www.saqqararecords.com
Anonymous
September 13, 2004 7:05:35 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Thomas Bishop" <bishopthomas@sbcglobal.net> wrote in message news:<2P61d.389$bN2.287@newssvr22.news.prodigy.com>...
> "TYY" <tyler@dhiw.com> wrote in message
> > Gringo style or the real way
> >
> > feel free to type it phonetically
>
> Here we go again. What about Neutrik while we're at it?

The people who answer the phone at Neumann USA say "noy-mahn".


I've heard Neutrik pronounced "Noy -trick" but I don't know if that's correct.



bob
Anonymous
September 13, 2004 7:24:12 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

<neil.henderson@sbcglobal.netNOSPAM> wrote in message
news:1681d.411$os3.284@newssvr22.news.prodigy.com...
> "TYY" <tyler@dhiw.com> wrote in message
> news:b6b7a391.0409121723.4117f08c@posting.google.com...
> > Gringo style or the real way
> >
> > feel free to type it phonetically
>
> It's "Noy", but if you were to say "New", people would still know what you
> meant (but would probably just refer to you as: "that guy who can't say
> 'Neumann' right").

I pronounce it Newman, glaring, with my lips tight and my jaw clenched,
followed by a moment of sullen silence.

dtk
Anonymous
September 13, 2004 7:24:13 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

dt king wrote:

> I pronounce it Newman, glaring, with my lips tight and my jaw clenched,
> followed by a moment of sullen silence.

Damn! That does get it out just right. Remarkable.


Bob
--

"Things should be described as simply as possible, but no
simpler."

A. Einstein
Anonymous
September 13, 2004 8:34:53 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

TYY wrote:

> Gringo style or the real way

How about German Style ?

How do you pronounce Georg ?


Graham
September 13, 2004 11:56:41 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

NOY - as in anNOYing
Anonymous
September 13, 2004 12:01:50 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

TYY wrote:
> Gringo style or the real way
>
> feel free to type it phonetically

Well if you're going to pronounce it the way a German person would say
it, it would be "NOY-mahn", with the vowel sound in the first syllable
identical to the "oy" in "TOY", and a longer "ah" vowel sound in the
second syllable.

Generally, words starting with "Neu-" in German are pronounced "NOY-".
So Neutrik is "NOY-trick".

However, I guess lots of people will still understand you if you said
"NEW-man" or "NEW-trick" as in the English word "Neutral".

So much for consistency of pronunciation!!

Chris W

--
The voice of ignorance speaks loud and long,
but the words of the wise are quiet and few.
--
Anonymous
September 13, 2004 12:13:49 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"dt king" <usenet001@@@leztoys.com> wrote in message
news:vp81d.166545$9d6.80822@attbi_s54...
>
> I pronounce it Newman, glaring, with my lips tight and my jaw clenched,
> followed by a moment of sullen silence.

lol
Anonymous
September 13, 2004 1:19:01 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"TYY" <tyler@dhiw.com> wrote in message
news:b6b7a391.0409121723.4117f08c@posting.google.com...
> Gringo style or the real way
>
> feel free to type it phonetically



NOY-man



Patrick
Anonymous
September 13, 2004 5:32:21 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

TYY wrote:
> Gringo style or the real way

With oi as in Oi Punk. Same as with Neutrik.

Johann
--
315733
Anonymous
September 13, 2004 5:46:52 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

TYY <tyler@dhiw.com> wrote:
>>
>> Here we go again. What about Neutrik while we're at it?


> My intent was not to debate or educate, but to take a poll. How many
> native english speakers say "new-mun" how many say "noy-mon"?

> I say porsh-a, but for some reason I still say newmun U87 despite
> knowing better. Just curious to know if I'm the only gringo here.

I believe that AES has addressed this often discussed question and their
ruling on it is that if you own one it is "noymahn" and if you hope to own
one it is "newman". If you don't hope to own one, it is pronounced
"apex".


Rob R.
Anonymous
September 13, 2004 6:17:26 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

tyler@dhiw.com (TYY) wrote in
news:b6b7a391.0409121723.4117f08c@posting.google.com:

> Gringo style or the real way
>
> feel free to type it phonetically

It depends on whether or not Alfred E. is speaking into it.
Anonymous
September 13, 2004 7:47:53 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

N-oi-mun

"TYY" <tyler@dhiw.com> wrote in message
news:b6b7a391.0409121723.4117f08c@posting.google.com...
> Gringo style or the real way
>
> feel free to type it phonetically
September 13, 2004 10:46:54 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On 12 Sep 2004 18:23:18 -0700, tyler@dhiw.com (TYY) wrote:

>Gringo style or the real way
>
>feel free to type it phonetically


Don't you watch Sinefeld?


NNNNNew-min!
Anonymous
September 14, 2004 2:44:58 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

<< My intent was not to debate or educate, but to take a poll. How many
native english speakers say "new-mun" how many say "noy-mon"?
>>

I've only heard the "new-mun" pronunciation a very few times in the last 30
years, & it came not from audio folk, but musicians who didn't really know a
Neumann from a Shure. It's one German pronunciation that English speakers seem
to get right.



Scott Fraser
Anonymous
September 14, 2004 3:01:25 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

I say new-man or usually "you want @#%%^! $$$ for it?"

Tom eh!


"ScotFraser" <scotfraser@aol.com> wrote in message
news:20040913184458.27025.00000674@mb-m13.aol.com...
> << My intent was not to debate or educate, but to take a poll. How many
> native english speakers say "new-mun" how many say "noy-mon"?
> >>
>
> I've only heard the "new-mun" pronunciation a very few times in the last
> 30
> years, & it came not from audio folk, but musicians who didn't really know
> a
> Neumann from a Shure. It's one German pronunciation that English speakers
> seem
> to get right.
>
>
>
> Scott Fraser
Anonymous
September 14, 2004 4:46:46 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Some years back I had the great pleasure of performing and recording with
members of The Band. I asked Levon once when we were in the studio what mic
he thought sounded best for his voice. He said...<activating arkansas
drawl...> "Son, you just cain't beat that big norman..."

A km84 is a noy-min. U 47,48, 67, 87, M 49 etc are the BIG NORMANS

jepp

"Bob" <FlintsTone@Valve.Amps> wrote in message
news:p o8ck0t5bhsj4dtuo4ove3glpd5q1d29o8@4ax.com...
> On 12 Sep 2004 18:23:18 -0700, tyler@dhiw.com (TYY) wrote:
>
> >Gringo style or the real way
> >
> >feel free to type it phonetically
>
>
> Don't you watch Sinefeld?
>
>
> NNNNNew-min!
>
Anonymous
September 14, 2004 5:17:30 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

> How do you say Neumann?


"Over there... yeah, that one... hand me that good mic".
Anonymous
September 15, 2004 1:03:48 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Put "Neumann U87" in one of dubya's campaign speeches, listen to what comes
out, and say it the other way. (Bet he'd say "new-man".)

The audio industry's own little "Nook- you-lur"
aargh!





Kevin M. Kelly
"There needs to be a 12-step program for us gearheads"
September 15, 2004 6:48:53 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

>From: kellykevm@aol.com (Kevin Kelly)

>
>Put "Neumann U87" in one of dubya's campaign speeches, listen to what comes
>out, and say it the other way. (Bet he'd say "new-man".)
>
>The audio industry's own little "Nook- you-lur"
>aargh!
>

So, here's what I've got...

Neumann = Noy'-man
Neutrik = Noy'-trick
Schoeps = Sheps
Nuendo = New-end'-oh
Langevin = Lahn'-juh-vin
Digidesign = fascist

Did I leave any out?

-John Vice
www.summertimestudios.com
Anonymous
September 15, 2004 7:25:21 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On 15 Sep 2004 02:48:53 GMT, jsvice@aol.com (John) wrote:

>So, here's what I've got...
>
>Neumann = Noy'-man
>Neutrik = Noy'-trick
>Schoeps = Sheps
>Nuendo = New-end'-oh
>Langevin = Lahn'-juh-vin
>Digidesign = fascist
>
>Did I leave any out?

Cool. I've been trying to learn the Frog stuff cuz I love
the movies, but the German "eu" needs to be kinda with your
cheeks closer together, fer sure. Maybe less "y" in the "oy' ".
A hick American like me can't really get all three consecutive vowel
sounds to sound very convincing.

Chris Hornbeck
" ** this NG is chock full of metal midgets"
September 15, 2004 8:50:15 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

>From: Chris Hornbeck chrishornbeckremovethis@att.net

>Cool. I've been trying to learn the Frog stuff cuz I love
>the movies, but the German "eu" needs to be kinda with your
>cheeks closer together, fer sure.

Well, most of the folks here say an Americanized version of Langevin, which is
what I typed above. French would be more like Lahn-zjhe-vah(n), with the last
syllable being more nasal than the first. It's a vowel sound that really
doesn't exist in English.
-John Vice
www.summertimestudios.com
Anonymous
September 15, 2004 9:11:13 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On 15 Sep 2004 04:50:15 GMT, jsvice@aol.com (John) wrote:

>Well, most of the folks here say an Americanized version of Langevin, which is
>what I typed above. French would be more like Lahn-zjhe-vah(n), with the last
>syllable being more nasal than the first. It's a vowel sound that really
>doesn't exist in English.

Sorry, didn't mean to criticize your French, which I only know, and
vaguely, from records. And my German is pushing forty years old.

It's funny that I still remember the little Korean I learned from
living there, but all my childhood languages (at which I was a whiz!)
are mostly gone.

But my German teacher, who'd escaped from Czechoslovakia, got enough
pronuciation into me to last my lifetime. Thank you, Mrs. Guenter.

Mit der Umlaut,

Chris Hornbeck
Anonymous
September 15, 2004 10:41:01 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

jsvice@aol.com (John) wrote in message news:<20040914224853.06405.00000377@mb-m19.aol.com>...
> >From: kellykevm@aol.com (Kevin Kelly)
>
> So, here's what I've got...
>
> Neumann = Noy'-man
> Neutrik = Noy'-trick
> Schoeps = Sheps
> Nuendo = New-end'-oh
> Langevin = Lahn'-juh-vin
> Digidesign = fascist
>
> Did I leave any out?
>
> -John Vice
> www.summertimestudios.com

Pretty much agree with all these - except Schoeps. Had a discussion
with a German rep of the company a few weeks ago. He informed me that
the 'oe' is pronounced like in the philosopher's name 'Goethe' - Ger •
ta - or like in Gerber's baby food - with the accent on the 1st
syllable. Straight from HQ. Hope that helps. (Goes off singing that
old Styx tune...'too much time on my hands...' : )

will
Anonymous
September 15, 2004 7:56:46 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

> Pretty much agree with all these - except Schoeps. Had a discussion
> with a German rep of the company a few weeks ago. He informed me that
> the 'oe' is pronounced like in the philosopher's name 'Goethe' - Ger •
> ta - or like in Gerber's baby food - with the accent on the 1st
> syllable. Straight from HQ. Hope that helps. (Goes off singing that
> old Styx tune...'too much time on my hands...' : )

Ja, genau richtig.

Chris W

--
The voice of ignorance speaks loud and long,
but the words of the wise are quiet and few.
--
Anonymous
September 15, 2004 8:49:21 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"John" <jsvice@aol.com> wrote in message
news:20040914224853.06405.00000377@mb-m19.aol.com...
> >From: kellykevm@aol.com (Kevin Kelly)
>
> >
> >Put "Neumann U87" in one of dubya's campaign speeches, listen to
what comes
> >out, and say it the other way. (Bet he'd say "new-man".)
> >
> >The audio industry's own little "Nook- you-lur"
> >aargh!
> >
>
> So, here's what I've got...
>
> Neumann = Noy'-man
> Neutrik = Noy'-trick

Noy-trick is correct, but I still prefer to call it new-trick.
Noy-trick sounds affectatious.

> Schoeps = Sheps
> Nuendo = New-end'-oh
> Langevin = Lahn'-juh-vin
> Digidesign = fascist

Norm Strong
Anonymous
September 15, 2004 9:11:28 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

>> Neumann = Noy'-man
>> Neutrik = Noy'-trick
>> Schoeps = Sheps
>> Nuendo = New-end'-oh
>> Langevin = Lahn'-juh-vin
>> Digidesign = fascist
>>
>> Did I leave any out?

> Pretty much agree with all these - except Schoeps. Had a discussion
> with a German rep of the company a few weeks ago. He informed me that
> the 'oe' is pronounced like in the philosopher's name 'Goethe' - Ger .
> ta - or like in Gerber's baby food - with the accent on the 1st
> syllable.

well, quite realistic yet ;-) In German language we have the so-called
"Umlaute" which can be written in 2 ways ä=ae, ö=oe and ü=ue.

So, the name "GOEthe" COULD also be written "GÖthe" and "SchOEps" /
"SchÖps"-> I use this example to show, that just because there are 2
letters, they are not necessarily pronounced as 2 single letters following
each other...

"Langevin" is a french word and french is hard to pronounce correctly.
Maybe, you can find some Canadian (rather than a real frenchman) who speaks
french to show you the correct way to say it ;-)


Best wishes from good old yurop (yes, we already have computers) ;-D

Phil from Germany
September 16, 2004 1:51:11 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

>"John" <jsvice@aol.com> wrote in message
>news:20040914224853.06405.00000377@mb-m19.aol.com...
>> >From: kellykevm@aol.com (Kevin Kelly)
>>
>> >
>> >Put "Neumann U87" in one of dubya's campaign speeches, listen to
>what comes
>> >out, and say it the other way. (Bet he'd say "new-man".)
>> >
>> >The audio industry's own little "Nook- you-lur"
>> >aargh!
>> >
>>
>> So, here's what I've got...
>>
>> Neumann = Noy'-man
>> Neutrik = Noy'-trick
>
>Noy-trick is correct, but I still prefer to call it new-trick.
>Noy-trick sounds affectatious.
>
>> Schoeps = Sheps
>> Nuendo = New-end'-oh
>> Langevin = Lahn'-juh-vin
>> Digidesign = fascist
>
>Norm Strong

That reminds me... I left out:
Neve = Neeve
What kind of list would it be without that?


-John Vice
www.summertimestudios.com
Anonymous
September 16, 2004 2:03:52 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

What about Gefell?

George Reiswig
Song of the River Music

"Philipp Wachtel" <phw@gmx.de> wrote in message
news:ci9m2u$2jg$1@newsreader2.netcologne.de...
> >> Neumann = Noy'-man
> >> Neutrik = Noy'-trick
> >> Schoeps = Sheps
> >> Nuendo = New-end'-oh
> >> Langevin = Lahn'-juh-vin
> >> Digidesign = fascist
> >>
> >> Did I leave any out?
>
> > Pretty much agree with all these - except Schoeps. Had a discussion
> > with a German rep of the company a few weeks ago. He informed me that
> > the 'oe' is pronounced like in the philosopher's name 'Goethe' - Ger .
> > ta - or like in Gerber's baby food - with the accent on the 1st
> > syllable.
>
> well, quite realistic yet ;-) In German language we have the so-called
> "Umlaute" which can be written in 2 ways ä=ae, ö=oe and ü=ue.
>
> So, the name "GOEthe" COULD also be written "GÖthe" and "SchOEps" /
> "SchÖps"-> I use this example to show, that just because there are 2
> letters, they are not necessarily pronounced as 2 single letters following
> each other...
>
> "Langevin" is a french word and french is hard to pronounce correctly.
> Maybe, you can find some Canadian (rather than a real frenchman) who
speaks
> french to show you the correct way to say it ;-)
>
>
> Best wishes from good old yurop (yes, we already have computers) ;-D
>
> Phil from Germany
>
>
Anonymous
September 16, 2004 5:17:15 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

> What about Gefell?

In German the letter "G" is always pronounced "hard" (like in "great"), not
"soft" (like in gender) like in English, French, Italian and a few other
languages. Well, actually there are some German regional dialects where the
"G" is pronounced softer, but formally in plain German it´s pronounced hard
like in "great".

Example: "Gefell" might be written "Guefell" (similar to "guess" - you
write the "u" but only pronounce the "e" following it) for correct English
pronunciation

I think, the correct pronunciation of the "umlaute" can be compared to the
"th" in English - just to give an idea ;-) it´s hard, if you ´haven´t
learned it from child´s age. My experience is that American students of
German had no real problems with "ä" and "ü" but "ö" is more difficult.

Any other questions?


Phil
Anonymous
September 16, 2004 6:49:53 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Yep...I pretty much knew what you said here, but it's nice to get
confirmation, so thanks! My question (idiot moi for not being more to the
point earlier) was primarily around emphasis:

Suppose the * is a schwa sound.
Is it GEF-*l (emphasis on first syllable), or geh-FELL?

George Reiswig
Song of the River Music

"Philipp Wachtel" <phw@gmx.de> wrote in message
news:cibsno$mqt$1@newsreader2.netcologne.de...
> > What about Gefell?
>
> In German the letter "G" is always pronounced "hard" (like in "great"),
not
> "soft" (like in gender) like in English, French, Italian and a few other
> languages. Well, actually there are some German regional dialects where
the
> "G" is pronounced softer, but formally in plain German it´s pronounced
hard
> like in "great".
>
> Example: "Gefell" might be written "Guefell" (similar to "guess" - you
> write the "u" but only pronounce the "e" following it) for correct English
> pronunciation
>
> I think, the correct pronunciation of the "umlaute" can be compared to the
> "th" in English - just to give an idea ;-) it´s hard, if you ´haven´t
> learned it from child´s age. My experience is that American students of
> German had no real problems with "ä" and "ü" but "ö" is more difficult.
>
> Any other questions?
>
>
> Phil
>
>
Anonymous
September 16, 2004 9:33:27 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

> Yep...I pretty much knew what you said here, but it's nice to get
> confirmation, so thanks!

no problem at all ;-)

> My question (idiot moi for not being more to the
> point earlier) was primarily around emphasis:
>
> Suppose the * is a schwa sound.

what do you mean by "schwa" ???

> Is it GEF-*l (emphasis on first syllable), or geh-FELL?

well, good question. partly depends on the region, which syllable gets the
emphasis. People from southern Germany, Switzerland or Austria are likely to
leave the first syllable out if it´s just so short -> "G´fell"

I personally would choose the "GEF-*l" variation. Some years ago, I tried to
learn Finnish (crazy but very nice people from the far eastern north of
europe), which is a really hard language to learn. Anyway, inFinnish there´s
a straight rule to ALWAYS emphasize the FIRST syllable...


Best wishes,

Phil
Anonymous
September 16, 2004 10:44:08 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Philipp Wachtel <phw@gmx.de> wrote:
>>> Langevin = Lahn'-juh-vin

> "Langevin" is a french word and french is hard to pronounce correctly.
> Maybe, you can find some Canadian (rather than a real frenchman) who speaks
> french to show you the correct way to say it ;-)

Okay, I will volunteer. Close I think, but the last part, "vin" would
be pronounced more like "van" (like minivan) except the "n" is cut
short a bit.

Rob R.
Not a real Frenchman, not a real Quebecker, some sort of a Canadian
a bit of a Dutchman.
Anonymous
September 19, 2004 12:49:58 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Thomas Bishop" <bishopthomas@sbcglobal.net> wrote in message
news:2P61d.389$bN2.287@newssvr22.news.prodigy.com...
> "TYY" <tyler@dhiw.com> wrote in message
>> Gringo style or the real way
>>
>> feel free to type it phonetically
>
> Here we go again. What about Neutrik while we're at it?


.... and Braun .

geoff
Anonymous
September 19, 2004 12:51:55 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Pooh Bear" <rabbitsfriendsandrelations@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:4145155C.E43B5C6C@hotmail.com...
> TYY wrote:
>
>> Gringo style or the real way
>
> How about German Style ?
>
> How do you pronounce Georg ?

Hint, it sounds like a homosexual advocacy group.


geoff
Anonymous
September 19, 2004 8:47:44 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Geoff Wood <geoff@paf.co.nz-nospam> wrote:

> "Pooh Bear" <rabbitsfriendsandrelations@hotmail.com> wrote in message
>>
>> How do you pronounce Georg ?

> Hint, it sounds like a homosexual advocacy group.

> geoff

And how do you say "Geoff"?

Just kidding, "Jeff"

Rob R. (A guy with a last name that no one ever pronounces correctly)
Anonymous
September 20, 2004 2:02:36 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Rob Reedijk wrote:
>
> Rob R. (A guy with a last name that no one ever pronounces correctly)

So how do you say it?
Anonymous
September 20, 2004 12:08:32 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Philipp Wachtel" <phw@gmx.de> wrote in message news:<ci9m2u$2jg$1@newsreader2.netcologne.de>...
> >> Neumann = Noy'-man
> >> Neutrik = Noy'-trick
> >> Schoeps = Sheps
> >> Nuendo = New-end'-oh
> >> Langevin = Lahn'-juh-vin
> >> Digidesign = fascist
> >>
> >> Did I leave any out?
>
> > Pretty much agree with all these - except Schoeps. Had a discussion
> > with a German rep of the company a few weeks ago. He informed me that
> > the 'oe' is pronounced like in the philosopher's name 'Goethe' - Ger .
> > ta - or like in Gerber's baby food - with the accent on the 1st
> > syllable.
>
> well, quite realistic yet ;-) In German language we have the so-called
> "Umlaute" which can be written in 2 ways ä=ae, ö=oe and ü=ue.
>
> So, the name "GOEthe" COULD also be written "GÖthe" and "SchOEps" /
> "SchÖps"-> I use this example to show, that just because there are 2
> letters, they are not necessarily pronounced as 2 single letters following
> each other...
>

Wait, um... so how *would* you pronounce Schoeps? Like" "sheps" only
your lips & tongue stays in that tight-pursed position as if preparing
to make an "R" sound?
Anonymous
September 20, 2004 6:15:37 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Kurt Albershardt <kurt@nv.net> wrote:
> Rob Reedijk wrote:
>>
>> Rob R. (A guy with a last name that no one ever pronounces correctly)

> So how do you say it?

"Ray-Dike" is how I pronounce it. In the Netherlands it would actually
have a rolling gutteral R in the front. When my parents emigrated to
Canada, they and others in the family actually started pronouncing it
"Ree-Dick", like the first half of "ridiculous". Other members of
the family started to spell it "Reedyk" since the "ij" in Dutch is
actually is one letter, sort of like the "ae" from Latin. The "y" also
was easier for Canadians to cope with. I probably would have not been
called "Reject" as much. Well, hopefully...

Rob R.
September 20, 2004 8:05:52 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

>From: mr_furious@mail.com (Buster Mudd)

>
>"Philipp Wachtel" <phw@gmx.de> wrote in message
>news:<ci9m2u$2jg$1@newsreader2.netcologne.de>...
>> >> Neumann = Noy'-man
>> >> Neutrik = Noy'-trick
>> >> Schoeps = Sheps
>> >> Nuendo = New-end'-oh
>> >> Langevin = Lahn'-juh-vin
>> >> Digidesign = fascist
>> >>
>> >> Did I leave any out?
>>
>> > Pretty much agree with all these - except Schoeps. Had a discussion
>> > with a German rep of the company a few weeks ago. He informed me that
>> > the 'oe' is pronounced like in the philosopher's name 'Goethe' - Ger .
>> > ta - or like in Gerber's baby food - with the accent on the 1st
>> > syllable.
>>
>> well, quite realistic yet ;-) In German language we have the so-called
>> "Umlaute" which can be written in 2 ways ä=ae, ö=oe and ü=ue.
>>
>> So, the name "GOEthe" COULD also be written "GÖthe" and "SchOEps" /
>> "SchÖps"-> I use this example to show, that just because there are 2
>> letters, they are not necessarily pronounced as 2 single letters following
>> each other...
>>
>
>Wait, um... so how *would* you pronounce Schoeps? Like" "sheps" only
>your lips & tongue stays in that tight-pursed position as if preparing
>to make an "R" sound?
>
Well, that's what I was wondering... It appears to me that if you go by the
above explanation, you'd pronounce it "sherps."

Which doesn't seem quite right to me... but maybe we can get some
clarification. Besides, if that actually is correct, I can make a concious
decision to pronounce it incorrectly. "Sheps" flows better off the lazy
American tongue.
-John Vice
www.summertimestudios.com
Anonymous
September 20, 2004 9:46:41 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Kurt Albershardt" <kurt@nv.net> wrote in message
news:2r76jcF16ie7kU3@uni-berlin.de...
> Rob Reedijk wrote:
>>
>> Rob R. (A guy with a last name that no one ever pronounces correctly)
>
> So how do you say it?


Arrrr .


geoff
Anonymous
September 20, 2004 9:46:42 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

<< > So how do you say it?>>


<<Arrrr . >>

Well, that's how a pirate would say it.


Scott Fraser
Anonymous
September 20, 2004 9:46:43 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

ScotFraser <scotfraser@aol.com> wrote:
> << > So how do you say it?>>


> <<Arrrr . >>

> Well, that's how a pirate would say it.

But I don't want to be a pirate.

Rob R.
Anonymous
September 20, 2004 9:46:44 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

<< But I don't want to be a pirate.
>>



OK, you can be the Indian chief, Hank will be the pirate, Ty is the policeman.
OK, all together now, "Y, M, C, A. !"


Scott Fraser
Anonymous
September 20, 2004 9:46:45 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

ScotFraser <scotfraser@aol.com> wrote:
> << But I don't want to be a pirate.
> >>



> OK, you can be the Indian chief, Hank will be the pirate, Ty is the policeman.
> OK, all together now, "Y, M, C, A. !"

There was no Pirate in the Village People. The Village People---Get it?
Notice they weren't called the "Seafarin' People"!

Rob R.
Anonymous
September 20, 2004 10:00:02 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

>> So, the name "GOEthe" COULD also be written "GÖthe" and "SchOEps" /
>> "SchÖps"-> I use this example to show, that just because there are 2
>> letters, they are not necessarily pronounced as 2 single letters
>> following
>> each other...
>>
>
> Wait, um... so how *would* you pronounce Schoeps? Like" "sheps" only
> your lips & tongue stays in that tight-pursed position as if preparing
> to make an "R" sound?

"sheps" is definitely wrong. i can´t really describe it better, but the "Ö"
is pronounced pretty similar to the "eu" in French (like in "monsiEUr")...
hope that helps you a little.

"Braun" is pronounced pretty much like "Brown" - NOT "Brawn" !!! ;-)

"Telefunken" is pronounced alomst like "Teh-leh-foonkan" (looks interesting
written this way ;-) )


phil
Anonymous
September 20, 2004 10:17:35 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

>>Wait, um... so how *would* you pronounce Schoeps? Like" "sheps" only
>>your lips & tongue stays in that tight-pursed position as if preparing
>>to make an "R" sound?
>>
> Well, that's what I was wondering... It appears to me that if you go by
> the
> above explanation, you'd pronounce it "sherps."

Why didn´t that come to my mind?! That´s should be the easiest way to
explain it to native English speakers.
Yeah, like "sherps" just try to leave out that "rolling" of the "r" and
you´re pretty close

phil
!