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THX speakers

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September 21, 2004 3:23:10 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Hello,
I have a new THX-select rated receiver and am looking at speakers. the
system is primarily for home theatre. The speakers I like (Or b audio)
aren't THX rated and the manufacturer emailed me this:

Our speakers will work fine with a THX receiver...the THX
specification calls for the satellites to be crossed over at 80hz, and
our
speakers are designed with that in mind. We have not submitted our
speakers
for certification by THX because it is cost-prohibitive for a small
company,
and in the end performance is what counts.

How important is the THX designation for speakers in your opinion?

Thanks,
Dave

More about : thx speakers

Anonymous
September 21, 2004 6:34:56 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Dave <Daveellison2000@yahoo.com> wrote:
>
>How important is the THX designation for speakers in your opinion?

It is basically meaningless. The THX certification basically says that
the speakers will meet a very low minimal standard. To some extent this
even takes away any motivation on the part of the manufacturer to make
the product any better.

The overall THX certification for theatres is a pretty good thing, because
it does mean that the equipment meets some minimal standard, but more
importantly it means the room acoustics meet some minimal standard. (Sadly
it does not mean that either one will be properly aligned).

The home THX stuff is just an equipment standard, and a pretty low one at
that. The acoustical reference that was the whole point of the original
THX theatre spec is missing from it. It is totally emasculated.
--scott

--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
Anonymous
September 22, 2004 7:31:31 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

> How important is the THX designation for speakers in your opinion?

It's George Lucas's personal guarantee that you are paying too much for
unremarkable speakers.
Related resources
Anonymous
September 22, 2004 2:10:04 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

>How important is the THX designation for speakers in your opinion?

How important is it that your cables say "monster" on them?

Especially in the home theater market, where rooms are designed for
entertaining more than listening, THX isn't much more than an advertising ploy.
You can even buy "THX Certified" computer speakers. That puts the PUH! in
Puh-Lease!


Joe Egan
EMP
Colchester, VT
www.eganmedia.com
Anonymous
September 22, 2004 6:53:44 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"EganMedia" <eganmedia@aol.com> wrote in message
news:20040922061004.04552.00002748@mb-m27.aol.com...
> >How important is the THX designation for speakers in your opinion?
>
> How important is it that your cables say "monster" on them?
>
> You can even buy "THX Certified" computer speakers. That puts the PUH! in
> Puh-Lease!

.... and that's silly, because ... ?

James Connelly Scott
AE
Houston, Tx
www.sunrisefilms.com
Anonymous
September 22, 2004 9:43:53 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On 22 Sep 2004 11:40:52 -0400, kludge@panix.com (Scott Dorsey) wrote:

>As it is, most people seem to be convinced that THX is a particular sound
>format. They don't need to go to the theatre to hear a movie in THX because
>they have THX at home! This misconception again totally defeats the whole
>purpose.

Another foolishness, around here anyway, is to let THX be synonymous
with 15 dB too loud. Bring hearing protection.

Now, Robert Duvall, the original THX, can't be faulted. Love his work.

Chris Hornbeck
Anonymous
September 23, 2004 4:33:28 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Chris Hornbeck" <chrishornbeckremovethis@att.net> wrote in message

> Now, Robert Duvall, the original THX, can't be faulted. Love his work.
>
> Chris Hornbeck

That was so quirky I wasn't sure it was science fiction.... great movie.
Anonymous
September 24, 2004 11:12:53 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

> On the other hand, when I used to sell Bryston, I remember that they had
> a THX version of various amplifiers for a fixed amount more, basically
> the licensing fee.

Actually it's more like franchising. The THX certification literally names
brands of electrical components that must be used, each of which has passed
certification (and paid fees), right down to the screws for mounting
speakers to walls. It's no different than having to buy McDonald's approved
tables and chairs for a McDonald's restaurant. One part quality control,
three parts taxing.

As a result THX certified models didn't replace the standard models in
Bryston's product line because the standard ones sound better. Movie
theaters are a major market to Bryston so they were very motivated to get
THX compliance, but it wasn't exactly a learning experience in amp design.

If I owned a movie theater I'd have a prominent sign reading "Proudly NOT
restricted by THX compliance"
Anonymous
September 25, 2004 4:51:36 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Sugarite" <nobody@home.com> wrote in message
news:6O15d.3478$Xh4.1964@read1.cgocable.net...
>> On the other hand, when I used to sell Bryston, I remember that they had
>> a THX version of various amplifiers for a fixed amount more, basically
>> the licensing fee.
>
> Actually it's more like franchising. The THX certification literally
> names
> brands of electrical components that must be used, each of which has
> passed
> certification (and paid fees), right down to the screws for mounting
> speakers to walls. It's no different than having to buy McDonald's
> approved
> tables and chairs for a McDonald's restaurant. One part quality control,
> three parts taxing.

That sounds like you could actually end up building something that sounded
_worse_ by having to use certain components that while fine in and of
themselves might not work well together.
Anonymous
September 25, 2004 10:44:03 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <si35d.254045$Fg5.70946@attbi_s53> rhunt22@hotmail.com writes:

> That sounds like you could actually end up building something that sounded
> _worse_ by having to use certain components that while fine in and of
> themselves might not work well together.

I'm not sure that it sounded worse, but when Mackie sought THX
certification for their HD-824 speakers, they had to add an RCA jack
for the signal input and put instructions in the manual for building
an attenuator so the powered speakers could be connected to the output
of a power amplifier.

I think they were shooting for getting the speaker certified for
mixing in a THX certified facility but had to go the whole route and
get them certified for home theater use where they were unlikely to be
fed from a balanced line level source.

--
I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
!