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spectrum analyzer- tuning room

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Anonymous
September 22, 2004 12:30:14 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Hello All

I've finally thrown out enough junk in the den to set up my home project
studio. I've been collecting gear for a while and finally got a set of Event
Precision 8's. I love em'. I use an aardvark Q10 for audio I/O into my PC,
but I'm probably looking to upgrade soon (Tascam DM-24 w/firewire maybe).

Anyway, to my real question: tuning the room.

I'm thinking of getting a spectrum analyzer to help find the rough
frequencies in the room and to help my mixes perhaps by giving me a visual.
I need suggestions here... what are the options? Hardware versus software.
And is a 31 band eq the only way to go to tune a room?

Is there an RNC kind of answer to the following:
spectrum analyzer
31-band eq

You insight is, as always, much appreciated.

-hevusa
www.ROBOTmichaelDEATHspringer.com <---find me here
Anonymous
September 22, 2004 4:41:35 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Hev wrote:

> I've finally thrown out enough junk in the den to set up my home project
> studio. I've been collecting gear for a while and finally got a set of Event
> Precision 8's. I love em'. I use an aardvark Q10 for audio I/O into my PC,
> but I'm probably looking to upgrade soon (Tascam DM-24 w/firewire maybe).

> Anyway, to my real question: tuning the room.

> I'm thinking of getting a spectrum analyzer to help find the rough
> frequencies in the room and to help my mixes perhaps by giving me a visual.
> I need suggestions here... what are the options? Hardware versus software.
> And is a 31 band eq the only way to go to tune a room?

> Is there an RNC kind of answer to the following:
> spectrum analyzer
> 31-band eq

> You insight is, as always, much appreciated.

Putting myself potentially at risk of being excommunicated from The
Church of the Devine Backbeat, I humbly suggest you look over the
Behringer DEQ2496, which can be had for less than $350, includes a
"graphic" EQ, a parametric EQ, a dynamic EQ, feedback suppression both
settable and forgettable (auto <g>) and a functional 31-band RTA, and
some other stuff, too, (I think, but therefore could be wrong).

I recently installed three of these and was quite pleased. I am about to
spec one for a new church system in the nearest town, and will be
getting one to experiment with for my own uses shortly.

It's quite a lot of bangaroo for what's left of the dollar.

--
ha
Anonymous
September 22, 2004 7:06:30 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <PZj4d.9873$464.3895@trnddc01>, Hev <none@youwouldknow.com> wrote:
>
>I'm still unsure of what the most cost effective solution is to treating the
>room with sound absorption products.

That depends what kind of absorption you need and what frequencies are a
problem. And that's why you need to get the F. Alton Everest book.
--scott

--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
Related resources
Anonymous
September 22, 2004 11:20:38 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"hank alrich" <walkinay@thegrid.net> wrote in message
news:1gkh4y3.6181u9xgu3iiN%walkinay@thegrid.net...
> Hev wrote:
>
> > I've finally thrown out enough junk in the den to set up my home project
> > studio. I've been collecting gear for a while and finally got a set of
Event
> > Precision 8's. I love em'. I use an aardvark Q10 for audio I/O into my
PC,
> > but I'm probably looking to upgrade soon (Tascam DM-24 w/firewire
maybe).
>
> > Anyway, to my real question: tuning the room.
>
> > I'm thinking of getting a spectrum analyzer to help find the rough
> > frequencies in the room and to help my mixes perhaps by giving me a
visual.
> > I need suggestions here... what are the options? Hardware versus
software.
> > And is a 31 band eq the only way to go to tune a room?
>
> > Is there an RNC kind of answer to the following:
> > spectrum analyzer
> > 31-band eq
>
> > You insight is, as always, much appreciated.
>
> Putting myself potentially at risk of being excommunicated from The
> Church of the Devine Backbeat, I humbly suggest you look over the
> Behringer DEQ2496, which can be had for less than $350, includes a
> "graphic" EQ, a parametric EQ, a dynamic EQ, feedback suppression both
> settable and forgettable (auto <g>) and a functional 31-band RTA, and
> some other stuff, too, (I think, but therefore could be wrong).
>
> I recently installed three of these and was quite pleased. I am about to
> spec one for a new church system in the nearest town, and will be
> getting one to experiment with for my own uses shortly.
>
> It's quite a lot of bangaroo for what's left of the dollar.

That Behringer model does indeed seem like a lot of bang for the buck. I
might not use it for this application but I could see myself using it for
other things in the future. Thanks Hank.

-Hev
Find Me Here:
www.michaelROBOTSspringerBEGONE.com
Anonymous
September 22, 2004 11:20:39 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Hev wrote:


> That Behringer model does indeed seem like a lot of bang for the buck. I
> might not use it for this application but I could see myself using it for
> other things in the future. Thanks Hank.

I had the prececessor to this unit and it added an
incredible amount of LF noise even set flat. It gathers
dust. Is the newer one better in that regard?


Bob
--

"Things should be described as simply as possible, but no
simpler."

A. Einstein
Anonymous
September 23, 2004 12:10:37 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On Wed, 22 Sep 2004 19:59:27 GMT, "Hev" <none@youwouldknow.com> wrote:

>"Scott Dorsey" <kludge@panix.com> wrote in message
>> I suggest looking at the F. Alton Everest book on small studio acoustics
>> before doing anything at all.
>
>Did an Amazon.com search and got a bunch of titles. Can you narrow it down
>to a title that would best suit my needs?

"Sound Studio Construction on a Budget", 1997, is a good start.
Then his earlier "Master Handbook of Acoustics". Both are very
readable. Measure twice, cut once.

Chris Hornbeck
Anonymous
September 23, 2004 3:15:19 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Bob Cain wrote:

> Hev wrote:

> > That Behringer model does indeed seem like a lot of bang for the buck. I
> > might not use it for this application but I could see myself using it for
> > other things in the future. Thanks Hank.

> I had the prececessor to this unit and it added an
> incredible amount of LF noise even set flat. It gathers
> dust. Is the newer one better in that regard?

Absolutely, this one has no flies on it that I've found yet. Now, when I
get one here I'll beat on it in ways I didn't with the three installed
in a dance studio in Austin TX. While that wasn't a control room type of
listening environment I did listen via the Senn HD280's, and in one room
it's 4 Bag End TA2000's and a D12E sub driven by Crest PL400's. I think
I'd have noticed unacceptable noise.

The units were clean, clear, and very versatile. I also plan to give the
Beri DCX2496 a whirl. Hopefully I'll get enough stuff off of my plate in
the next couple of weeks to get on with subjecting the Beri's to secret
investigations here at the mountain.

--
ha
September 23, 2004 12:58:24 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <cirslp$o1f$1@panix2.panix.com>, Scott Dorsey
<kludge@panix.com> wrote:

> >And is a 31 band eq the only way to go to tune a room?
>
> No, equalizing out room problems is misguided and does not tune the room, it
> just hides some of the problems. Tuning a room involves actually changing
> the room configuration to fix the problems, not trying to hide the problems
> with some cheesy electronics.


Scott certainly is right about first fixing your control room. Get help
from someone in your area with a clue about this. Personally, I don't
think there are many people with a clue in this area. I certainly would
never design my own control room.

And once you've done everything you realistically can with the room, I
certainly would also recommend a nice 31 band like a Klark Teknik and
borrowing/renting a nice analyzer like a Klark Teknik.

Most important is the person doing the tweeking. I hire the guy who did
my control room. I'm usually the one standing at the mix position
moving the mic in a circle while he fiddles about. Really like the eq
curve he goes for on the analyzer. (Top & bottom with a very specific
rolled off.)

My control room needs a tweak around 4 times a year. Remember, your big
speakers' output is not some universal constant. They change over time
with use. I have the room redone at the change of seasons.

Am not talking big changes on the KT eq. But the difference is
strikingly noticeable when the playback is set up right. Very wide
imaging. Nice accurate bottom. Mixes that go out into the world with
very happy clients.




David Correia
Celebration Sound
Warren, Rhode Island

CelebrationSound@aol.com
www.CelebrationSound.com
Anonymous
September 25, 2004 1:09:19 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"david" <ihate@spamo.com> wrote in message
news:230920040458281351%ihate@spamo.com...
> And once you've done everything you realistically can with the room, I
> certainly would also recommend a nice 31 band like a Klark Teknik and
> borrowing/renting a nice analyzer like a Klark Teknik.

I wouldn't. You can hear why by patching one across your 2-buss. I wouldn't
put anything in my monitor path that I'd be at all hesitant to place in my
program path.

The only analyzer that's ok is one which can separate the sound from the
speaker from that coming from the room. This will correct speaker system
deficiencies only. Coloring the monitors can't reverse room colorations and
only adds to the confusion.

The major studios REALLY learned this one the hard way back in the 1970s.



--
Bob Olhsson Audio Mastery, Nashville TN
Mastering, Audio for Picture, Mix Evaluation and Quality Control
Over 40 years making people sound better than they ever imagined!
615.385.8051 http://www.hyperback.com
!