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Can anyone recommend a good, basic synthesizer?

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Anonymous
September 23, 2004 11:55:54 PM

Archived from groups: rec.music.makers.synth,rec.audio.pro (More info?)

...for someone who just has a midi-capable keyboard and some digital
recording computer software?

I'm basically into chord progressions and adding layers of sounds on
top. I'm a beginner in terms of technical abilities, but I know sounds
and I wnat something that sounds professional (not the cheesy keyboard
+ "synth" you find in KMart, unless I'm wrong and you can find quality
keyboard/synth combo machines?).

Looking for something that is basic, easy to use, but still produces
some great sounds. Dont need tons of bells and whistles.

Any insight is much appreciated. Thanks!
Anonymous
September 24, 2004 3:00:25 AM

Archived from groups: rec.music.makers.synth,rec.audio.pro (More info?)

I recommend the Alesis Quadrasynth Plus. Sounds great and not overly
expensive when compared to many keyboards. Has tons of features. For added
punch, you can run synth modules in parallel via midi. There may be others,
but I found this to be the best value - and I'm a stingy tightwad....



"littleearthquakes" <jupiterdog123@earthlink.net> wrote in message
news:35000146.0409231855.1307f7d0@posting.google.com...
> ..for someone who just has a midi-capable keyboard and some digital
> recording computer software?
>
> I'm basically into chord progressions and adding layers of sounds on
> top. I'm a beginner in terms of technical abilities, but I know sounds
> and I wnat something that sounds professional (not the cheesy keyboard
> + "synth" you find in KMart, unless I'm wrong and you can find quality
> keyboard/synth combo machines?).
>
> Looking for something that is basic, easy to use, but still produces
> some great sounds. Dont need tons of bells and whistles.
>
> Any insight is much appreciated. Thanks!
Anonymous
September 24, 2004 11:08:36 AM

Archived from groups: rec.music.makers.synth,rec.audio.pro (More info?)

I like my Roland JP-8000. You can get a used one cheaply enough. Lots of
sounds that you can modify and then save as your own. MIDI interface so you
can let the computer do the fingering when the going gets tough. ^_^
--
Yours Truly,
--- Dave

----------------------------------------------------------------------
'raid if you're afraid you'll have to overlook it.
Besides, you knew the job was dangerous when you took it.
----------------------------------------------------------------------
"littleearthquakes" <jupiterdog123@earthlink.net> wrote in message
news:35000146.0409231855.1307f7d0@posting.google.com...
> ..for someone who just has a midi-capable keyboard and some digital
> recording computer software?
>
> I'm basically into chord progressions and adding layers of sounds on
> top. I'm a beginner in terms of technical abilities, but I know sounds
> and I wnat something that sounds professional (not the cheesy keyboard
> + "synth" you find in KMart, unless I'm wrong and you can find quality
> keyboard/synth combo machines?).
>
> Looking for something that is basic, easy to use, but still produces
> some great sounds. Dont need tons of bells and whistles.
>
> Any insight is much appreciated. Thanks!
Related resources
Anonymous
September 24, 2004 1:46:14 PM

Archived from groups: rec.music.makers.synth,rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"David Nakamoto" <res07oeg@verizon.net> wrote in message news:<UJP4d.12208$464.4891@trnddc01>...

> I like my Roland JP-8000. You can get a used one cheaply enough. Lots of
> sounds that you can modify and then save as your own. MIDI interface so you
> can let the computer do the fingering when the going gets tough. ^_^

The JP-8000 is maybe a bit too specialized as a dance-oriented unit
to be as "basic" as you may want and the Quadrasynth is a bit long in
the tooth compared to its more recent cousins, in my opinion. While it
depends on your ultimate goal, look a bit more seriously at the Alesis
QS 6.1 and the Roland XP-30. Both are pretty simple & direct to
operate and offer sound expansion options in the form of sound library
cards. They will both run you between $500-700 second-hand and are
pretty well proven to have had staying power with most users. They are
good-sounding, fundamental workhorse units and will remain useful,
even if you decide to add gear later. These addresses should help, as
well as lead you to info on almost every other synth ever MADE, whew!

http://www.harmony-central.com/Synth/Data/Alesis/QS6-1-...
http://www.harmony-central.com/Synth/Data/Roland/XP-30-...

--

HellPope Huey
First SETI response hailed
as aliens beam out Voyager response!:
"SEND MORE CHUCK BERRY!"

"Its one thing for a ghost to terrorize my children
and quite another for him to play my Theremin!"
- "The Simpsons"

If Dracula can't see his reflection in the mirror,
how come his hair is always so neatly combed?
- Steven Wright
Anonymous
September 24, 2004 2:24:00 PM

Archived from groups: rec.music.makers.synth,rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Good and basic are pretty broad terms but I'll do my best.It still
comes down to what you think you want to get out of a synth in
relation to the music you make.To cut to the chase> THE DISCONTINUED
(32 voice) ROLAND SH-32($250.00 new on e/bay blowout) ONLY if you have
Midi keyboard as it is a tabletop modual.....OR...THE
KORG"MICROKORG"or MS-2000 OR 2000Rack(4 voice)...........NOW BACK TO
MY STORY....Although its not a true analog synth(which may not matter
to some),Ive been running propellerheads reason(softsynths) for a
couple years and for the$240.00 @guitar center its still impressing
me.On the other hand,the roland stuff old or new is very
reliable.Polyphonic wise,A juno 106,juno60,or jx-3p,with the
programmer is an affordable entry.The only problem with these besides
a possible back up battery replacement/or other fixes is after a
certain point,you learn they dont offer much beyond basic synthy type
sounds.The more advanced and older jupiter 6(1983") and jupiter
8s(1981") are considered classics and are holding their value.They
offer a very wider palette of sounds and sound
exceptional....(pricy).If you are looking into the later roland
synths,86-?You start getting into digital/analog hybrids (D-50,D-70)
which offer samples within their occillaters often resulting in those
"bells and crystle"or "breathy air"newage type sounds.The roland
jd-800 synth is all sample based and has very good fxs
dist,delay,reverb,... a good piano and a very usable wide range of
sounds(from old synth to glassy bell like) and sports a very expensive
clean full frequency hi-fi sound.The jd-990 rack verson adds a ring
modualater and might be better since you own a controller.The roland
Jp-8000 uses physical modeling(no samples) in its attempt to
re-capture the early 80's roland glory and is nice but I would not
considerate a basic synth in a good way.It has knobs and sliders to
turn(important) and you can layer two sounds on top of each other.At
that level,another modeling synth with knobs is the Clavia nord lead
2(my favorite of the two modeling synths) which will stack 4 sounds
with four separate outputs and sports 16 voices...(jp8000- is 8
voices...4 voices when you stack but less costly).My synth collection
is as follows and each offer a specific flavor.
Roland jupiter-6(going to my grave)As sythetic as roland gets for
me.Programmable.
Arp solina sting ensemble(no sample or anything else comes close for
70's strings.)
PPG wave 2.2(sounds like nothing else,nothing sounds like it
Japan..thomas dolby.
Moog mini moog(BALLS...the equivalent to the strat or les paul)Leads
and basses!!!fx
Moog tarus pedals.v1(fills in the bottom end via feet.
Clavia nord lead 2(built like a tank and is always in tune.not smooth
as true analog)
Oberheim OBX-A(not versitile but..huge size musical tones..smooth
buttery to cutting
Roland sh-32( portable, built very well but not expensive,great
jupite/juno emulation)tabletop convienient. tweekable.cool arpegiater
and good fx.

I hope this was helpfull.Im currently contemplating what to sell and
what to keep as Ive been on a mission to downsize.





jupiterdog123@earthlink.net (littleearthquakes) wrote in message news:<35000146.0409231855.1307f7d0@posting.google.com>...
> ..for someone who just has a midi-capable keyboard and some digital
> recording computer software?
>
> I'm basically into chord progressions and adding layers of sounds on
> top. I'm a beginner in terms of technical abilities, but I know sounds
> and I wnat something that sounds professional (not the cheesy keyboard
> + "synth" you find in KMart, unless I'm wrong and you can find quality
> keyboard/synth combo machines?).
>
> Looking for something that is basic, easy to use, but still produces
> some great sounds. Dont need tons of bells and whistles.
>
> Any insight is much appreciated. Thanks!
Anonymous
September 24, 2004 8:53:10 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

<< more recent cousins, in my opinion. While it
depends on your ultimate goal, look a bit more seriously at the Alesis
QS 6.1 >>

I have a 6.1 and it sure does a lot of things for what they cost at the time.
And the expnasion cards have a lot of good sounds. Do they still make these?



---------------------------------------
"I know enough to know I don't know enough"
September 25, 2004 4:15:26 PM

Archived from groups: rec.music.makers.synth,rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Since you already have a computer, you could consider using software
synths - there is a *lot* of stuff available now.

Greg.
Anonymous
September 25, 2004 8:40:44 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

>While it
>depends on your ultimate goal, look a bit more seriously at the Alesis
>QS 6.1 and the Roland XP-30. Both are pretty simple & direct to
>operate and offer sound expansion options in the form of sound library
>cards.

Good cheap all-around units. The Roland comes with a lot more sounds
though. I believe the Orchestral, Session and another expansion card in
addition to the standard ROM. If you are buying a rompler and want bang for
your buck that's the one to get.


"I'm beginning to suspect that your problem is the gap between
what you say and what you think you have said."
-george (paraphrased)
Anonymous
September 26, 2004 1:45:54 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

For a classic synth sound you need to look here.

http://www.clavia.se/
Anonymous
September 29, 2004 4:10:44 PM

Archived from groups: rec.music.makers.synth,rec.audio.pro (More info?)

jupiterdog123@earthlink.net (littleearthquakes) wrote in message news:<35000146.0409231855.1307f7d0@posting.google.com>...
> ..for someone who just has a midi-capable keyboard and some digital
> recording computer software?
>
> I'm basically into chord progressions and adding layers of sounds on
> top. I'm a beginner in terms of technical abilities, but I know sounds
> and I wnat something that sounds professional (not the cheesy keyboard
> + "synth" you find in KMart, unless I'm wrong and you can find quality
> keyboard/synth combo machines?).
>
> Looking for something that is basic, easy to use, but still produces
> some great sounds. Dont need tons of bells and whistles.
>
> Any insight is much appreciated. Thanks!

Do you want more of a synth, or a keyboard that has synth sounds?

In terms of bang for the buck new, you can't beat the Emu Proteus PK-6
keyboard, or the Ensoniq badged version (called the Halo).

These (if they are still out there) run $399 new, and sound pretty
damn good.

I bought an Ensoniq (it's really an Emu, just badged as an Ensoniq)
Halo for $399 new, and added a bunch of their cards (B3, Vintage
Synths, Extreme lead) when they got really cheap...as in $99 or so.
For the $800 or so I now have in it, it kicks butt on anything else
new that is under $1000.

These may not be available new anymore though.

Many people have suggested some synths for you (e.g. JP-8000), but you
need to figure out if you want a synth, a keyboard, or a bit of both.

I kind of like the Emu for a cheap keyboard/synth as it has four real
time control knobs that can be switched in four banks to give you 16
parameters to control...you can do a lot with just those parameters.

The JP-8000 is very cool, especially as cheap as they have gotten but
other than strings or synth brass forget about doing regular sounds on
it, it's really best at doing synth stuff.

Analogeezer
September 26, 2013 1:44:25 PM

I always say if you are going to get a synth, get a nord lead, try one at your local store and you will be gobsmacked.
Then buy one discounted one online and you will never look back, try amazon.com ebay.com or synthdirect.com for some good deals.
!