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Rudy Van Gelder leaves his microphones out all the time qu..

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Anonymous
September 28, 2004 5:32:09 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Hello, there was some recent discussion around here about the Rudy Van
Gelder interview in TapeOp. I read that article yesterday. I noticed
a picture intermingled with the article where all of his microphone
stands were grouped in a corner with all the mics still on them and
the mic cables wound up and draped on the stand. (They were all pretty
beefy stands on wheels and didnt look like they tipped easily).

I, being a selftaught recordist that never worked at another studio,
always put my mics away for fear of dust, being knocked, etc....but
then set-up is always much longer. Do all of you put your mics away
each time or leave them out, wired and ready to go ala Rudy Van
Gelder?

This guy has been recording since the 50s or so, so I can only imagine
how much dust is on his mics. Maybe thats his unknown secret.

thx,
frenchy
Anonymous
September 28, 2004 5:32:10 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Is old Rudy a rich man? That might explain it.


In article <f07jl0dj9aobbvs7c8bjeml278pf5s91c1@4ax.com>, they call me
frenchy! <NOfrenchySPAM@NOsmackdabmusicSPAM.com> wrote:

> Hello, there was some recent discussion around here about the Rudy Van
> Gelder interview in TapeOp. I read that article yesterday. I noticed
> a picture intermingled with the article where all of his microphone
> stands were grouped in a corner with all the mics still on them and
> the mic cables wound up and draped on the stand. (They were all pretty
> beefy stands on wheels and didnt look like they tipped easily).
>
> I, being a selftaught recordist that never worked at another studio,
> always put my mics away for fear of dust, being knocked, etc....but
> then set-up is always much longer. Do all of you put your mics away
> each time or leave them out, wired and ready to go ala Rudy Van
> Gelder?
>
> This guy has been recording since the 50s or so, so I can only imagine
> how much dust is on his mics. Maybe thats his unknown secret.
>
> thx,
> frenchy

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Anonymous
September 28, 2004 10:30:49 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

they call me frenchy! wrote:

> I, being a selftaught recordist that never worked at another studio,
> always put my mics away for fear of dust, being knocked, etc....but
> then set-up is always much longer. Do all of you put your mics away
> each time or leave them out, wired and ready to go ala Rudy Van
> Gelder?

Lots of professional facilities are equipped with HVAC that effectively
filters most of the grit out of the air. In my case, I leave them out if
they're going to be used shortly, leave them out and covered with Crown
Royal bags (that I get from a local saloon) if they'll be needed fairly
soon but ought to be covered, and put them away if the stands will be in
the way fairly shortly.

> This guy has been recording since the 50s or so, so I can only imagine
> how much dust is on his mics. Maybe thats his unknown secret.

LOL!

--
ha
Related resources
Anonymous
September 28, 2004 10:30:50 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On Tue, 28 Sep 2004 18:30:49 GMT, walkinay@thegrid.net (hank alrich)
wrote:

>they call me frenchy! wrote:
>
>> I, being a selftaught recordist that never worked at another studio,
>> always put my mics away for fear of dust, being knocked, etc....but
>> then set-up is always much longer. Do all of you put your mics away
>> each time or leave them out, wired and ready to go ala Rudy Van
>> Gelder?
>
>Lots of professional facilities are equipped with HVAC that effectively
>filters most of the grit out of the air. In my case, I leave them out if
>they're going to be used shortly, leave them out and covered with Crown
>Royal bags (that I get from a local saloon) if they'll be needed fairly
>soon but ought to be covered, and put them away if the stands will be in
>the way fairly shortly.
>
>> This guy has been recording since the 50s or so, so I can only imagine
>> how much dust is on his mics. Maybe thats his unknown secret.
>
>LOL!

Its nice to make you laugh. You definitely made me laugh back in Feb
2002 with "When I finish chuckling I shall be asleep." That was a
good one. Thx for your input. I actually have a sizeable collection
of crown royal bags and have actually wondered if covering my
condensers that way would be worse due to the dust/lint inside the
bags. I need a shot, I'm too uptight I think.

thx,
frenchy
Anonymous
September 28, 2004 11:34:40 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

they call me frenchy! wrote:

> Its nice to make you laugh.

Thank you; I am grateful for good medicine that is also free.

> You definitely made me laugh back in Feb
> 2002 with "When I finish chuckling I shall be asleep." That was a
> good one. Thx for your input. I actually have a sizeable collection
> of crown royal bags and have actually wondered if covering my
> condensers that way would be worse due to the dust/lint inside the
> bags. I need a shot, I'm too uptight I think.

Turn the bags inside out and launder them. You won't have lint problems
unless you stuff them under your shirt. They work well enough if the
airborne dust burden isn't out of hand. If ti is, then mics shouldn't be
out, maybe even to be used. <g>

--
ha
Anonymous
September 29, 2004 1:46:24 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

<< leave them out and covered with Crown
Royal bags (that I get from a local saloon) >>



Oh I see, from a local saloon, a likely story.


Scott Fraser
Anonymous
September 29, 2004 4:35:02 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"they call me frenchy!" <NOfrenchySPAM@NOsmackdabmvsicSPAM.com> wrote in
message news:f07jl0dj9aobbvs7c8bjeml278pf5s91c1@4ax.com...

> Do all of yov pvt yovr mics away
> each time or leave them ovt, wired and ready to go ala Rvdy Van
> Gelder?

Many stvdios did this in the mid '60s. Some even left them all in place on
stvdio-owned instrvments. Most mikes came with a dvst cover for when yov
weren't vsing it. Remember that almost all mvsic sessions at the time
involved ensembles that vsed 6 to 12 mikes rather than the two or three vsed
in overdvb sessions today. Most sessions also involved well paid vnion
mvsicians who wovldn't be very likely to rip stvdios off.

--
Bob Olhsson Avdio Mastery, Nashville TN
Mastering, Avdio for Pictvre, Mix Evalvation and Qvality Control
Over 40 years making people sovnd better than they ever imagined!
615.385.8051 http://www.hyperback.com
Anonymous
September 29, 2004 5:32:40 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Not becavse they were well paid stvdio mvsicians, bvt becavse they had a
date there the next day. ;-)
I hate to say this bvt I also think the air was a lot cleaner 30-40 years
ago and back then, most stvdios were bvilt to last, no real home stvdios,
except for Les Pavl and a few other folks. If yov were a bvsy stvdio, yov
didn't have time, everything was left miked, drvms, piano, amps, only the
vocal mikes were moved ovt of the away.

Tom







"Bob Olhsson" <olh@hyperback.com> wrote in message
news:Wqn6d.450609$OB3.244953@bgtnsc05-news.ops.worldnet.att.net...
> "they call me frenchy!" <NOfrenchySPAM@NOsmackdabmvsicSPAM.com> wrote in
> message news:f07jl0dj9aobbvs7c8bjeml278pf5s91c1@4ax.com...
>
> > Do all of yov pvt yovr mics away
> > each time or leave them ovt, wired and ready to go ala Rvdy Van
> > Gelder?
>
> Many stvdios did this in the mid '60s. Some even left them all in place on
> stvdio-owned instrvments. Most mikes came with a dvst cover for when yov
> weren't vsing it. Remember that almost all mvsic sessions at the time
> involved ensembles that vsed 6 to 12 mikes rather than the two or three
vsed
> in overdvb sessions today. Most sessions also involved well paid vnion
> mvsicians who wovldn't be very likely to rip stvdios off.
>
> --
> Bob Olhsson Avdio Mastery, Nashville TN
> Mastering, Avdio for Pictvre, Mix Evalvation and Qvality Control
> Over 40 years making people sovnd better than they ever imagined!
> 615.385.8051 http://www.hyperback.com
>
>
Anonymous
September 30, 2004 8:54:01 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"they call me frenchy!" wrote:
> Hello, there was some recent discussion around here about the Rudy Van
> Gelder interview in TapeOp. I read that article yesterday. I noticed
> a picture intermingled with the article where all of his microphone
> stands were grouped in a corner with all the mics still on them and
> the mic cables wound up and draped on the stand. (They were all pretty
> beefy stands on wheels and didnt look like they tipped easily).
>
> I, being a selftaught recordist that never worked at another studio,
> always put my mics away for fear of dust, being knocked, etc....but
> then set-up is always much longer. Do all of you put your mics away
> each time or leave them out, wired and ready to go ala Rudy Van
> Gelder?
>
> This guy has been recording since the 50s or so, so I can only imagine
> how much dust is on his mics. Maybe thats his unknown secret.

I'm sure he covers them when not in use. He might also have them cleaned
from time to time.

Since he's the only engineer who uses the studio (except perhaps/hopefully
for his assistant during off hours) it probably doesn't matter where he
stores them. He could put them in a closet, or he could just leave them out
for the next session.

Sorceror in NY used to leave their 47's and 48's on stands in the live room
upstairs. I'm sure that had to have brought in business.

-jw
Anonymous
September 30, 2004 9:54:15 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Re: Rudy Van Gelder leaves his microphones out all the time question...

Group: rec.audio.pro Date: Thu, Sep 30, 2004, 4:54am (EDT+4) From:
johnwashburn99@nyc.rr.com (John Washburn)

Sorceror in NY used to leave their 47's and 48's on stands in the live
room upstairs. I'm sure that had to have brought in business.
-jw<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<

As did Gotham Recording in NY during the 60's. With over 40 Neumann
mics with power supplys spread out over 4 studios that were used every
day it was easier to just leave them on their stands.

Eric
Anonymous
September 30, 2004 12:38:05 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <20183-415BD7C7-60@storefull-3254.bay.webtv.net> Audioetc@webtv.net writes:

> Re: Rudy Van Gelder leaves his microphones out all the time question... =

> As did Gotham Recording in NY during the 60's. With over 40 Neumann
> mics with power supplys spread out over 4 studios that were used every
> day it was easier to just leave them on their stands.

I think the reason this is surprising to some people here today is
because their own studios (and mics) aren't being used every day.
Also, in the '60's, microphones weren't the most pricey thing in the
house, they were just working tools, and the more the merrier. Today
we often treat them like jewels, particularly those that cost us a
couple of grand (when our recorder and mixer costs us less).



--
I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
Anonymous
September 30, 2004 12:46:12 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

> I hate to say this but I also think the air was a lot cleaner 30-40 years
> ago and back then,

True, but everybody smoked 30 or 40 years ago.

Back in the day, one studio I worked in sent a U47 to Gotham to be cleaned
because you could actually SEE the tar build up on the diaphram.


--
Chris White, Freelance Advertising Writer & Voice Overs*
Email: chris@chriswhite.com Web: www.chriswhite.com
Phone: 757-621-1348
*Your opinion may vary
Anonymous
September 30, 2004 3:03:25 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Eric Toline wrote:

> As did Gotham Recording in NY during the 60's. With over 40 Neumann
> mics with power supplys spread out over 4 studios that were used every
> day it was easier to just leave them on their stands.


We did at United, too. We only had about five rooms by the time I got
there, but there were Neumanns set up in each room.
September 30, 2004 11:13:46 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Rudy has little covers that he puts over the mics before and after
recording. He wears white anti-static gloves when he sets up in his
room. His room is very nice sounding and was built to his spec as I'm
sure you know. His drum booth is pretty basic and so are his micing
techniques. He uses the usual mics mostly Neumann and sometimes
manufacturers give him mics to try out. Last time I was there he had a
couple of Sony mics that he was trying out. I can't impress upon
people enough that the room, which is quite large with very high
ceilings accounts for his beautiful sound. He knows where to place
people in the room to achieve what he wants. It is true as I have
witnessed on occassions that if you touch, wink, or move a mic you
will regret it.


Chris
Anonymous
October 1, 2004 10:52:28 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Shawn" <dataguy_wcom@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:D a1f3e5b.0409301813.3c613352@posting.google.com...
> Rudy has little covers that he puts over the mics before and after
> recording. He wears white anti-static gloves when he sets up in his
> room.

Ah, must be the gloves. What's the best white anti-static gloves for under
$2.50?
Anonymous
October 6, 2004 1:16:24 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

I finally had a chance to read the interview. They really captured his essence.

Tape-Op remains my favorite, much like RE/P was 20 - 25 years ago.
Anonymous
October 6, 2004 1:49:28 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Don Cooper <dcooper28800@comcast.net> wrote:
>I finally had a chance to read the interview. They really captured his essence.

They didn't really talk very much about philosophy at all. They talked a
little bit about what he did, but they didn't really talk very much about
why he did things. Not in any detail, anyway. I think that's kind of a
shame, but even so it was one of the better interviews I have seen with him.

>Tape-Op remains my favorite, much like RE/P was 20 - 25 years ago.

Tape-Op is one of the most fun magazines around today, but it's still a
pale shadow of R/E/P.
--scott

--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
Anonymous
October 6, 2004 12:13:53 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <41634767.A06C21FC@comcast.net>,
Don Cooper <dcooper28800@comcast.net> wrote:

> I finally had a chance to read the interview. They really captured his
> essence.
>
> Tape-Op remains my favorite, much like RE/P was 20 - 25 years ago.


I recently acquired several years ('87-'92) of RE/P. Tape Op is not in the same
league as RE/P from a technical standpoint, although it is probably the best of
the current publications.

-Jay
--
x------- Jay Kadis ------- x---- Jay's Attic Studio ------x
x Lecturer, Audio Engineer x Dexter Records x
x CCRMA, Stanford University x http://www.offbeats.com/ x
x---------- http://ccrma.stanford.edu/~jay/ ------------x
Anonymous
October 6, 2004 1:17:06 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <41634767.A06C21FC@comcast.net> dcooper28800@comcast.net writes:

> I finally had a chance to read the interview.

I haven't, but that issue of Tape Op just arrived yesterday. Should
have read the Van Gelder article instead of listening to the VP
debate. Ho, hum.


--
I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
Anonymous
October 6, 2004 3:41:24 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Mike Rivers wrote:

> > I finally had a chance to read the interview.
>
> I haven't, but that issue of Tape Op just arrived yesterday. Should
> have read the Van Gelder article instead of listening to the VP
> debate. Ho, hum.


Maybe they distribute them regionally, because mine just arrived this
week, too.
Anonymous
October 6, 2004 3:45:02 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Jay Kadis wrote:

> I recently acquired several years ('87-'92) of RE/P. Tape Op is not in the same
> league as RE/P from a technical standpoint, although it is probably the best of
> the current publications.


I still have all the issues of RE/P. The early ones are especially fun.
They take up a bit of space, but I like having them.

I also have all the Mix magazines. I'm thinking of getting rid of EQ and
some others.
Anonymous
October 6, 2004 3:45:03 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <416412FD.8CBBEEA7@comcast.net>,
Don Cooper <dcooper28800@comcast.net> wrote:

> Jay Kadis wrote:
>
> > I recently acquired several years ('87-'92) of RE/P. Tape Op is not in the
> > same
> > league as RE/P from a technical standpoint, although it is probably the
> > best of
> > the current publications.
>
>
> I still have all the issues of RE/P. The early ones are especially fun.
> They take up a bit of space, but I like having them.
>
> I also have all the Mix magazines. I'm thinking of getting rid of EQ and
> some others.

I finally dumped the old Modern Recordings when we moved last. The ads were
fun, but I couldn't stand the haircuts anymore. Speaking of ads, did you see
the Tascam ad in the MIX TEC supplement? For a second I thought they re-issued
the 3440!

-Jay
--
x------- Jay Kadis ------- x---- Jay's Attic Studio ------x
x Lecturer, Audio Engineer x Dexter Records x
x CCRMA, Stanford University x http://www.offbeats.com/ x
x---------- http://ccrma.stanford.edu/~jay/ ------------x
Anonymous
October 6, 2004 4:53:59 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Jay Kadis wrote:

> I finally dumped the old Modern Recordings when we moved last. The ads were
> fun, but I couldn't stand the haircuts anymore.


I plead guilty to keeping those, too. They started in 1975, and ended
some time in the '80's, I think.


> Speaking of ads, did you see
> the Tascam ad in the MIX TEC supplement? For a second I thought they re-issued
> the 3440!


I saw that. I thought it was funny that they had to say "Old!" next to
the 4 track. It probably cut down on people asking for the "warm,
vintage" equipment.

It is pretty amazing to consider the prices of the 4 track vs. the 24
track, and what one can get now for the dollar.
Anonymous
October 6, 2004 5:46:10 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"they call me frenchy!" wrote:

> I noticed
> a picture intermingled with the article where all of his microphone
> stands were grouped in a corner with all the mics still on them and
> the mic cables wound up and draped on the stand.


I also noticed one of those "plant lights" in the picture.

Hmmmmm....
Anonymous
October 10, 2004 3:37:31 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Scott Dorsey wrote:

> >I finally had a chance to read the interview. They really captured his essence.
>
> They didn't really talk very much about philosophy at all. They talked a
> little bit about what he did, but they didn't really talk very much about
> why he did things. Not in any detail, anyway. I think that's kind of a
> shame, but even so it was one of the better interviews I have seen with him.


It's the only one I remember. When I said "essence", I probably should
have said "personality". I can just hear him saying the things he said
in the interview.

As far as the "secretive" nature that people talk about, I never
realized he was any more secretive than the next guy.

But, like I said, he's not promoted all over the place, like say, "Mixerman".
Anonymous
October 10, 2004 10:33:17 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Don Cooper" <dcooper28800@comcast.net> wrote in message
news:4168AE79.A8250BA0@comcast.net...

> As far as the "secretive" nature that people talk about, I never
> realized he was any more secretive than the next guy.

He seems to be. When someone from NPR interviewed him, she clapped her hands
at the beginning just to test the system. According to her, Van Gelder
freaked out, demanded that she give him the tape (DAT), and gave her a new
one to record on instead. He didn't want even the slightest record of what
his studio's response was like. He also made the ground rules for the
interview that he would not, under any circumstances, discuss what his
techniques were. I assume the same ground rules applied to the TapeOp
interview.

Peace,
Paul
Anonymous
October 10, 2004 1:00:20 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Don Cooper <dcooper28800@comcast.net> wrote:
>
>As far as the "secretive" nature that people talk about, I never
>realized he was any more secretive than the next guy.

It's possible that his reluctance to talk about technique might just be
because he wants to talk about philosophy and thinks technique follows
directly from philosophy. I don't know, but I'd like to be able to ask
him someday.

>But, like I said, he's not promoted all over the place, like say, "Mixerman".

He was, fifty years ago. But then, the jazz community back then was a very
small one too.
--scott
--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
Anonymous
October 10, 2004 4:15:22 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <4168AE79.A8250BA0@comcast.net> dcooper28800@comcast.net writes:

> As far as the "secretive" nature that people talk about, I never
> realized he was any more secretive than the next guy.

I guess that when you don't do a whole lot more than get a bunch of
great musicans in a room with good acoustics, if people don't think
you have a secret to making a good recording, they'll stop talking
about you.


--
I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
Anonymous
October 10, 2004 4:15:23 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <NI4ad.682980$Gx4.671647@bgtnsc04-news.ops.worldnet.att.net> pstamlerhell@pobox.com writes:

> He seems to be. When someone from NPR interviewed him, she clapped her hands
> at the beginning just to test the system. According to her, Van Gelder
> freaked out, demanded that she give him the tape (DAT), and gave her a new
> one to record on instead. He didn't want even the slightest record of what
> his studio's response was like.

You mean some clever data jockey hasn't isolated a drum beat and made
an impulse response file for an acoustic modeling reverb program yet?
Geez, what are they waiting for? Someone to record a handclap in the
room? <g>



--
I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
Anonymous
October 10, 2004 7:42:16 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <znr1097409427k@trad>, Mike Rivers <mrivers@d-and-d.com> wrote:
>In article <NI4ad.682980$Gx4.671647@bgtnsc04-news.ops.worldnet.att.net> pstamlerhell@pobox.com writes:
>
>> He seems to be. When someone from NPR interviewed him, she clapped her hands
>> at the beginning just to test the system. According to her, Van Gelder
>> freaked out, demanded that she give him the tape (DAT), and gave her a new
>> one to record on instead. He didn't want even the slightest record of what
>> his studio's response was like.
>
>You mean some clever data jockey hasn't isolated a drum beat and made
>an impulse response file for an acoustic modeling reverb program yet?
>Geez, what are they waiting for? Someone to record a handclap in the
>room? <g>

I don't understand what he is so paranoid about. He also made wonderful
recordings in the Village Vanguard, and in what was at the time his mother's
living room. Surely those locations are much easier to get impulse responses
from (and I am sure whoever owns what was his mother's house would be willing
to engage in a short study)? And what would that tell us anyway?
--scott

--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
Anonymous
October 10, 2004 8:45:18 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Mike Rivers wrote:

> I guess that when you don't do a whole lot more than get a bunch of
> great musicans in a room with good acoustics, if people don't think
> you have a secret to making a good recording, they'll stop talking
> about you.

Still...secret method or not Dr.Van Gelder's recordings did have a certain
*tone* to them.
I agree with you though...not much point in investigating the how's and why's
of it.

--
Nathan

"Imagine if there were no Hypothetical Situations"
Anonymous
October 10, 2004 9:01:25 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Mike Rivers" <mrivers@d-and-d.com> wrote in message
news:znr1097409320k@trad...
>
> In article <4168AE79.A8250BA0@comcast.net> dcooper28800@comcast.net
> writes:
>
>> As far as the "secretive" nature that people talk about, I never
>> realized he was any more secretive than the next guy.
>
> I guess that when you don't do a whole lot more than get a bunch of
> great musicans in a room with good acoustics, if people don't think
> you have a secret to making a good recording, they'll stop talking
> about you.

That's kind of what I was thinking. Maybe all the weird behavior (like
taking the tape where the lady clapped) is to generate mystique (not that he
needs it).
Anonymous
October 10, 2004 9:01:26 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <FVdad.216309$MQ5.149566@attbi_s52> rhunt22@hotmail.com writes:

> > I guess that when you don't do a whole lot more than get a bunch of
> > great musicans in a room with good acoustics, if people don't think
> > you have a secret to making a good recording, they'll stop talking
> > about you.
>
> That's kind of what I was thinking. Maybe all the weird behavior (like
> taking the tape where the lady clapped) is to generate mystique (not that he
> needs it).

Someone told me that Joe Maphis (jazzy country guitar player from the
'50s) would sometimes drape a handkerchief over his fretting hand so
people couldn't see what he was playing. I never saw that, but I can
believe the story.

--
I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
Anonymous
October 10, 2004 9:01:27 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Mike Rivers" <mrivers@d-and-d.com> wrote in message
news:znr1097430025k@trad...
>
> In article <FVdad.216309$MQ5.149566@attbi_s52> rhunt22@hotmail.com writes:
>
>> > I guess that when you don't do a whole lot more than get a bunch of
>> > great musicans in a room with good acoustics, if people don't think
>> > you have a secret to making a good recording, they'll stop talking
>> > about you.
>>
>> That's kind of what I was thinking. Maybe all the weird behavior (like
>> taking the tape where the lady clapped) is to generate mystique (not that
>> he
>> needs it).
>
> Someone told me that Joe Maphis (jazzy country guitar player from the
> '50s) would sometimes drape a handkerchief over his fretting hand so
> people couldn't see what he was playing. I never saw that, but I can
> believe the story.

For years now on my live jazz recordings I use nearly identical xlr
connectors on either end of the mic cables so when they are plugged in it is
difficult for the casual observer to know which direction I'm running the
cables. ;) 
Anonymous
October 11, 2004 12:09:57 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Scott Dorsey" <kludge@panix.com> wrote in message
news:ckc3ao$67s$1@panix2.panix.com...
>
> I don't understand what he is so paranoid about. He also made wonderful
> recordings in the Village Vanguard, and in what was at the time his
> mother's
> living room. Surely those locations are much easier to get impulse
> responses
> from (and I am sure whoever owns what was his mother's house would be
> willing
> to engage in a short study)? And what would that tell us anyway?
> --scott

Well, if a person makes great recordings in three "random" rooms I'd say the
room is not the greatest common denominator in the equation. He must know
something.
Anonymous
October 11, 2004 2:22:50 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Charles Tomaras <tomaras@tomaras.comedy> wrote:

> For years now on my live jazz recordings I use nearly identical xlr
> connectors on either end of the mic cables so when they are plugged in it is
> difficult for the casual observer to know which direction I'm running the
> cables. ;) 

Yep it's so hard to see those arrows in the dark.

--
ha
Anonymous
October 11, 2004 4:46:54 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

>Charles Tomaras <tomaras@tomaras.comedy> wrote:
>
>> For years now on my live jazz recordings I use nearly identical xlr
>> connectors on either end of the mic cables so when they are plugged in it
>is
>> difficult for the casual observer to know which direction I'm running the
>> cables. ;) 
>
>Yep it's so hard to see those arrows in the dark.
>
>--
>ha
>
>
Of course, if you put a loop in the cable then the sound goes both ways and it
people can't figure it out. That's how the original loop got started. :>)

--Wayne

-"sounded good to me"-
Anonymous
October 11, 2004 5:10:56 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Mike Rivers" <mrivers@d-and-d.com> wrote in message
news:znr1097409320k@trad...

> I guess that when you don't do a whole lot more than get a bunch of
> great musicans in a room with good acoustics, if people don't think
> you have a secret to making a good recording, they'll stop talking
> about you.

He records in a freakin' pyramid... how much more cryptic can you get than
that? Anubis is looking over his shoulder every moment, shouldn't he be
secretive?

lol :D 

Neil Henderson
Anonymous
October 11, 2004 7:54:16 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Ricky W. Hunt" wrote:

> Maybe all the weird behavior
> is to generate mystique

Another applicable behavior: there are Hammond organ players who don't
allow anyone else to see what drawbar settings they use.

--
Jonathan Roberts * guitar, keyboards, vocals * North River Preservation
----------------------------------------------
To reach me reverse: moc(dot)xobop(at)ggestran
Anonymous
October 11, 2004 8:00:06 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Jonathan Roberts" <NotMe@NotMe.complex> wrote in message
news:Itnad.2320$Fg2.901644@newshog.newsread.com...
> "Ricky W. Hunt" wrote:
>
>> Maybe all the weird behavior
>> is to generate mystique
>
> Another applicable behavior: there are Hammond organ players who don't
> allow anyone else to see what drawbar settings they use.

I once heard that in truth there's only about 8 settings that organ players
use. Musicians are a superstitious lot.
Anonymous
October 11, 2004 12:52:15 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Jonathan Roberts <NotMe@NotMe.complex> wrote:
> "Ricky W. Hunt" wrote:
>
>> Maybe all the weird behavior
>> is to generate mystique
>
>Another applicable behavior: there are Hammond organ players who don't
>allow anyone else to see what drawbar settings they use.

I worked with a jazz drummer who had a secret thing that he covered with
a handkerchief and clipped between the beater and the head of the kick.
He refused to let anyone know what it was, but whatever it was or did, he
sounded better than anyone else who played that kit.
--scott
--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
Anonymous
October 11, 2004 1:06:31 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <aznad.225071$D%.183994@attbi_s51> rhunt22@hotmail.com writes:

> I once heard that in truth there's only about 8 settings that organ players
> use. Musicians are a superstitious lot.

Right. And there are only about 8 microphones that most recording
engineers use, too. (which isn't too far from the truth)

--
I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
Anonymous
October 11, 2004 5:57:27 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Scott Dorsey wrote:
> Jonathan Roberts <NotMe@NotMe.complex> wrote:
>
>>"Ricky W. Hunt" wrote:
>>
>>
>>>Maybe all the weird behavior
>>>is to generate mystique
>>
>>Another applicable behavior: there are Hammond organ players who don't
>>allow anyone else to see what drawbar settings they use.
>
>
> I worked with a jazz drummer who had a secret thing that he covered with
> a handkerchief and clipped between the beater and the head of the kick.
> He refused to let anyone know what it was, but whatever it was or did, he
> sounded better than anyone else who played that kit.
> --scott


It was a photograph of Van Gelder.

--
--
John Noll
Retromedia Sound Studios
Red Bank, NJ

jn145_deletethisfirst_@verizon.net

http://www.retromedia.net
Anonymous
October 11, 2004 7:26:52 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Scott Dorsey wrote:

> >But, like I said, he's not promoted all over the place, like say, "Mixerman".
>
> He was, fifty years ago. But then, the jazz community back then was a very
> small one too.


Well, there's a lot I don't know about him, and never thought to ask.
!