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What's the earliest adventure game that didn't have dying ..

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Anonymous
May 14, 2005 8:12:04 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.adventure (More info?)

The early Sierra adventures all seem to kill you off occasionally.
What was the first adventure game that didn't kill you off?
Was it a text-only adventure that preceded the Sierra King's Quest games?
What was the first graphic adventure that didn't kill you?
It wasn't Secret of Monkey Island, was it?

More about : earliest adventure game dying

Anonymous
May 14, 2005 8:12:05 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.adventure (More info?)

Jenny100 wrote:
> The early Sierra adventures all seem to kill you off
> occasionally.

An understatement, to be sure! (Did their later adventures ever soften
this brutal tendancy? Not to the best of my recollection... their
Manhunter games, at least, would let you reverse lethal mistakes
without having to endlessly dance the "Save / Restore" pas-a-deux.)

> What was the first adventure game that didn't kill you
> off? Was it a text-only adventure that preceded the
> Sierra King's Quest games?

I can't vouch for runners-up Magnetic Scrolls, Level 9 or
Adventuresoft, but games by the biggest text adventure company,
Infocom, appear to be Sierra's bloody-minded inspiration, often
featuring hunger, thirst and light (and encumbrance, ugh) limits
further complicating dungeons full of deathtraps and ravenous grues.
One of them, "Infidel", even contains a controversial end sequence
culminating in the player's death -- as part of "winning" the game!

> What was the first graphic adventure that didn't kill you?
> It wasn't Secret of Monkey Island, was it?

That looks like the right year (1990), if not necessarily the right
game. Earlier Lucasfilm graphical adventure games like Labyrinth and
Maniac Mansion featured industry-standard deaths; I can't vouch for Zak
McCracken ('88) or Indy's Last Crusade ('89 -- given the hero's endless
escapades, I suspect death is on the agenda somewhere), but Loom at
least (also released in '90) appears to be player-deathless. (If
careful notes aren't kept, it can be got into an unwinnable state, but
that is what your Book of Patterns is for after all.)

(The Secret of Monkey Island, on the other hand, contains two player
deaths -- though one is actually a Sierra-parodying false death, and
the other demands some due diligence and dedication to testing
Guybrush's breath-holding title.)

I must say that after being introduced to the elegant Lucasarts
deathless adventure design it was hard going back to endless series of
punishing and often arbitrary-seeming deaths in Sierra's and
Microprose's graphical adventure games. (Westwood's Legend of Kyrandia
games at least would often give you an "I don't think I should do
that..." warning before going ahead and letting you shoot yourself in
the foot anyhow.) The Simon the Sorcerer games seemed the only ones
that took the Lucasfilm deathlessness revolution to heart, and I like
to think that it has helped contribute to the longevity of their
popularity where other contemporary games of theirs have been
forgotten.

I only intended to share two cents, but I seem to have emptied my
wallet entirely. Keep the change.
May 14, 2005 4:59:26 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.adventure (More info?)

Op Sat, 14 May 2005 04:12:04 GMT schreef Jenny100 <nospam@nospam.com>:

>The early Sierra adventures all seem to kill you off occasionally.
>What was the first adventure game that didn't kill you off?

Tough question. I don't know.
As someone else said, Infocom games are out. So is Magnetic Scrolls.

I remember playing Perry Mason: The Case of the Mandarin Murder.
A text adventure with graphics by Telarium in 1986. You could lose
your case in court at the end of the game, but afaik there was no
dying.

>Was it a text-only adventure that preceded the Sierra King's Quest games?
>What was the first graphic adventure that didn't kill you?
>It wasn't Secret of Monkey Island, was it?
Anonymous
May 14, 2005 11:21:20 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.adventure (More info?)

UnwashedMass wrote:

>> The early Sierra adventures all seem to kill you off
>> occasionally.
....
> I must say that after being introduced to the elegant Lucasarts
> deathless adventure design it was hard going back to endless series of
> punishing and often arbitrary-seeming deaths in Sierra's and
> Microprose's graphical adventure games.

But to be honest, I loved to die for example in Space Quest I,
the deaths were very funny and so enriched my gaming experience.
Anonymous
May 14, 2005 11:30:56 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.adventure (More info?)

"Jenny100" <nospam@nospam.com> wrote in message
news:o Uehe.591$Ri4.32@newsread1.news.pas.earthlink.net...
> The early Sierra adventures all seem to kill you off occasionally.
> What was the first adventure game that didn't kill you off?
> Was it a text-only adventure that preceded the Sierra King's Quest games?
> What was the first graphic adventure that didn't kill you?
> It wasn't Secret of Monkey Island, was it?

hhmmm what about leisure suit larry 1? when did they start?
They would be close to the first... maybe!
Linda
May 14, 2005 11:30:57 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.adventure (More info?)

Op Sat, 14 May 2005 19:30:56 +1000 schreef "piester"
<piesterl@gopies.com>:

>
>"Jenny100" <nospam@nospam.com> wrote in message
>news:o Uehe.591$Ri4.32@newsread1.news.pas.earthlink.net...
>> The early Sierra adventures all seem to kill you off occasionally.
>> What was the first adventure game that didn't kill you off?
>> Was it a text-only adventure that preceded the Sierra King's Quest games?
>> What was the first graphic adventure that didn't kill you?
>> It wasn't Secret of Monkey Island, was it?
>
>hhmmm what about leisure suit larry 1? when did they start?
>They would be close to the first... maybe!
>Linda
>

You can die in Larry.
Anonymous
May 15, 2005 3:13:53 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.adventure (More info?)

"LS" <here!@> wrote in message
news:mgmb81h0nvvl687q4senksorrqut4kv6qr@4ax.com...
> Op Sat, 14 May 2005 19:30:56 +1000 schreef "piester"
> <piesterl@gopies.com>:
>
> >
> >"Jenny100" <nospam@nospam.com> wrote in message
> >news:o Uehe.591$Ri4.32@newsread1.news.pas.earthlink.net...
> >> The early Sierra adventures all seem to kill you off occasionally.
> >> What was the first adventure game that didn't kill you off?
> >> Was it a text-only adventure that preceded the Sierra King's Quest
games?
> >> What was the first graphic adventure that didn't kill you?
> >> It wasn't Secret of Monkey Island, was it?
> >
> >hhmmm what about leisure suit larry 1? when did they start?
> >They would be close to the first... maybe!
> >Linda
> >
>
> You can die in Larry.

It's been years since I played them...
when can you die?
Anonymous
May 15, 2005 3:13:54 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.adventure (More info?)

piester wrote:
> "LS" <here!@> wrote in message
> news:mgmb81h0nvvl687q4senksorrqut4kv6qr@4ax.com...
>
>>Op Sat, 14 May 2005 19:30:56 +1000 schreef "piester"
>><piesterl@gopies.com>:
>>
>>
>>>"Jenny100" <nospam@nospam.com> wrote in message
>>>news:o Uehe.591$Ri4.32@newsread1.news.pas.earthlink.net...
>>>
>>>>The early Sierra adventures all seem to kill you off occasionally.
>>>>What was the first adventure game that didn't kill you off?
>>>>Was it a text-only adventure that preceded the Sierra King's Quest
>
> games?
>
>>>>What was the first graphic adventure that didn't kill you?
>>>>It wasn't Secret of Monkey Island, was it?
>>>
>>>hhmmm what about leisure suit larry 1? when did they start?
>>>They would be close to the first... maybe!
>>>Linda
>>>
>>
>>You can die in Larry.
>
>
> It's been years since I played them...
> when can you die?
>
>
It's been years since I've played too. But I seem to recall that
there's a place where he can hookup with a ho and if he doesn't use a
condom he'll get VD and die.
Anonymous
May 15, 2005 3:13:54 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.adventure (More info?)

In article <4285f8fb$0$10307$afc38c87@news.optusnet.com.au>,
piesterl@gopies.com says...

>"LS" <here!@> wrote in message
>news:mgmb81h0nvvl687q4senksorrqut4kv6qr@4ax.com...
>> Op Sat, 14 May 2005 19:30:56 +1000 schreef "piester"
>> <piesterl@gopies.com>:

>> >"Jenny100" <nospam@nospam.com> wrote in message
>> >news:o Uehe.591$Ri4.32@newsread1.news.pas.earthlink.net...
>> >> The early Sierra adventures all seem to kill you off occasionally.
>> >> What was the first adventure game that didn't kill you off?
>> >> Was it a text-only adventure that preceded the Sierra King's Quest
>> >> games?
>> >> What was the first graphic adventure that didn't kill you?
>> >> It wasn't Secret of Monkey Island, was it?

>> >hhmmm what about leisure suit larry 1? when did they start?
>> >They would be close to the first... maybe!
>> >Linda

>> You can die in Larry.

>It's been years since I played them...
>when can you die?

When you leave the bar and walk into a nearby alley, you get mugged and die.
Then Sierra painstakingly explains all the trouble they have to go through to
revive a dead character and asks that you to not do it again.

--
Ken Rice -=:=- kennrice (AT) erols (DOT) com
http://users.erols.com/kennrice - Lego Compatible Flex Track,
Civil War Round Table of DC & Concentration Camp made of Lego bricks
http://members.tripod.com/~kennrice
Maps of Ultima 7 Parts 1 & 2, Prophecy of the Shadow, Savage Empire,
Crusaders of Dark Savant & Others.
May 15, 2005 3:13:55 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.adventure (More info?)

Op Sat, 14 May 2005 10:12:36 -0400 schreef Dick Sidbury
<drjamessidbury@hotmail.com>:

>piester wrote:
>> "LS" <here!@> wrote in message
>> news:mgmb81h0nvvl687q4senksorrqut4kv6qr@4ax.com...
>>
>>>Op Sat, 14 May 2005 19:30:56 +1000 schreef "piester"
>>><piesterl@gopies.com>:
>>>
>>>
>>>>"Jenny100" <nospam@nospam.com> wrote in message
>>>>news:o Uehe.591$Ri4.32@newsread1.news.pas.earthlink.net...
>>>>
>>>>>The early Sierra adventures all seem to kill you off occasionally.
>>>>>What was the first adventure game that didn't kill you off?
>>>>>Was it a text-only adventure that preceded the Sierra King's Quest
>>
>> games?
>>
>>>>>What was the first graphic adventure that didn't kill you?
>>>>>It wasn't Secret of Monkey Island, was it?
>>>>
>>>>hhmmm what about leisure suit larry 1? when did they start?
>>>>They would be close to the first... maybe!
>>>>Linda
>>>>
>>>
>>>You can die in Larry.
>>
>>
>> It's been years since I played them...
>> when can you die?
>>
>>
>It's been years since I've played too. But I seem to recall that
>there's a place where he can hookup with a ho and if he doesn't use a
>condom he'll get VD and die.

Yep!

And is there much difference between dying and "game over", for
instance when you're arrested by the cops for... eh... visibly wearing
a condom in the street? :) 
Anonymous
May 15, 2005 4:25:27 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.adventure (More info?)

UnwashedMass wrote:
> Jenny100 wrote:
>>What was the first graphic adventure that didn't kill you?
>>It wasn't Secret of Monkey Island, was it?
[...]
> (The Secret of Monkey Island, on the other hand, contains two player
> deaths -- though one is actually a Sierra-parodying false death, and
> the other demands some due diligence and dedication to testing
> Guybrush's breath-holding title.)

Or you can answer the phone in the middle of the sequence, and return
a half-hour later to find Guybrush's bloated corpse. :-(
--
David Tanguay
Anonymous
May 15, 2005 4:31:58 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.adventure (More info?)

Manfred Ginger wrote:

> But to be honest, I loved to die for example in Space Quest I,
> the deaths were very funny and so enriched my gaming experience.

Space Quest was a unique case -- as far as I can tell, the primary
appeal of the series hinged around the ubiquitous potential exotic
deaths the programmers had cooked up for poor Roger, which is why they
often featured particular and unique dazzling animations and humorous
scoldings -- I think that someone playing through a Space Quest game
without dying once would only experience maybe two-thirds to
three-quarters of the work, love and care put into the game.

(There's a site you may appreciate at http://tmd.alienharmony.com/rw/
called "The Many Deaths of Roger Wilco" -- aiming to present, through
transcript, video and sound capture, every different ignoble death
Roger Wilco is subjected to over the course of the Space Quest series.)

However, Space Quest deaths weren't typical of Sierra games -- far more
stuck in my memory is Police Quest 1's automatic player death if you
fail to walk around the car before entering. (Or how about its
legendary "You entered the shower with your uniform on. You died!"?)

Deaths in the Quest for Glory series seemed less arbitrary and more
understandable, rarely sneaking up on the player (who really thinks
that drinking Dragon's Breath is going to be a good career move?) but
my memories of King's Quest games are filled with frustration at dying
for no apparent reason other than walking off the path (ESPECIALLY
under circumstances of protagonist-invisibility to player, while
walking behind scenery -- trees, beanstalks etc. I couldn't see that
bend!), walking into surprisingly unwadeable water, and the perennial
favourite -- "Something just killed me, but I didn't see what it was."
All this bred in me as a player was resignation to unfair and arbitrary
deaths and brand loyalty to Lucasfilm 8)
Anonymous
May 15, 2005 4:42:06 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.adventure (More info?)

LS wrote

> You could lose your case in court at the end of the game,
> but afaik there was no dying.

Perhaps Jenny100 ought to specify whether "killing you off" refers to
"Game Over - You Lose" sequences in general or specifically to violent,
messy character murders. There must have been more games such as you
describe, with little reasonable potential for brutal physical violence
rendered upon the player character...

Does anyone recall if Les Manley finds a bad fate in his Search for the
King or while Lost in LA? (Howabout in Accolade's 1990 "Altered
Destiny"?)
Anonymous
May 15, 2005 4:55:58 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.adventure (More info?)

David Tanguay wrote:

> Or you can answer the phone in the middle of the sequence, and return
> a half-hour later to find Guybrush's bloated corpse. :-(

I've always been a fan of "idle animations" -- things characters on the
screen will do to indicate impatience in an absence of user input.
Some characters tap their feet or look at their watch -- others blow
bubbles, yo-yo or read a book. I see that little sequence as akin to
the ultimate extension of idle animations. (Well over a decade ago, I
remember having a strategizing conversation with a friend at that point
in the game when the screen movement in the corner of his eye caught
his attention and derailed our conversation. "Hey, Nick! I just
committed a felony!" We nearly soiled ourselves in the revelation that
/the game was playing itself!/)
Anonymous
May 15, 2005 7:41:34 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.adventure (More info?)

On 15 May 2005 12:55:58 -0700, "UnwashedMass" <growan@gmail.com> wrote:


>his attention and derailed our conversation. "Hey, Nick! I just
>committed a felony!" We nearly soiled ourselves in the revelation that
>/the game was playing itself!/)

Which game was that?

--
Michael Cecil
http://home.comcast.net/~macecil/
http://home.comcast.net/~safehex/
Anonymous
May 15, 2005 10:24:43 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.adventure (More info?)

Michael Cecil wrote:
>Which game was that?

I've been trying to keep the thread continuous, but I suppose all my
Space Quest interjections diluted the trail. The scene we were
describing is halfway to Guybrush Threepwood's death in the Secret of
Monkey Island (following the equally hilarious "stealing the Governor's
idol" cut-scene.)
Anonymous
May 15, 2005 10:26:22 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.adventure (More info?)

Ken Rice wrote:

>>> You can die in Larry.
>
>>It's been years since I played them...
>>when can you die?
>
> When you leave the bar and walk into a nearby alley, you get mugged and die.
> Then Sierra painstakingly explains all the trouble they have to go through to
> revive a dead character and asks that you to not do it again.

That was a great sequence, I LdMAO.
Anonymous
May 15, 2005 10:31:58 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.adventure (More info?)

Ken Rice wrote:

>The first game I ever saw the "bored character" was Commander Keen. He
would
>cross his arms, tap his toe, and eventually sit down to read a book.

That's what I was thinking of in my examples. In CK4, there's a unique
idle animation only shown once in the Pyramid of the Moon. If you idle
off while leaving Keen on one of the little crescent-moon signs on the
floor, he will take his pants off and "moon" you... blink and you miss
it for good. (There's a high concentration of secrets on that level --
it also contains the secret warp to take you to the inaccessible
"Forbidden Pyramid".)
Anonymous
May 16, 2005 12:35:12 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.adventure (More info?)

UnwashedMass wrote:
> LS wrote
>
>
>>You could lose your case in court at the end of the game,
>>but afaik there was no dying.
>
>
> Perhaps Jenny100 ought to specify whether "killing you off" refers to
> "Game Over - You Lose" sequences in general or specifically to violent,
> messy character murders. There must have been more games such as you
> describe, with little reasonable potential for brutal physical violence
> rendered upon the player character...


Mostly I was thinking of sudden "game overs" when you're exploring.

What inspired my original question was reading forums where
people complain about how developers have started to add
more action sequences and deaths to adventure games, and
others have answered that action sequences and deaths were
a part of classic adventure games and not really new.
For example, the Gabriel Knight games all have places you
can die in them yet are still considered classic examples
of adventure games. The King's Quest games have even more
deaths - often sudden and stupid deaths - for example if
you try to walk off the side of a staircase two steps
from the end instead of walking all the way down
and exiting the end of the staircase. As if a fall from
a height of a foot and a half is likely to kill anyone.


Anyway, then I got to thinking about what older adventure games
I knew of that didn't have deaths in them. And I thought of Myst
and I thought of the Monkey Island games. Monkey Island came first,
so that suggested LucasArts was the first company that thought
of eliminating deaths. But early LucasArts games did kill you
(I remember getting cacked in Zak McKraken). So I was wondering
at what point it occurred to some developer that eliminating
the penalties for experimenting with things in the gameworld
might be a way to enhance the game. From what I can tell,
LucasArts really was the first company to realize this.




> Does anyone recall if Les Manley finds a bad fate in his Search for the
> King or while Lost in LA? (Howabout in Accolade's 1990 "Altered
> Destiny"?)
>
Anonymous
May 16, 2005 2:20:51 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.adventure (More info?)

In article <1116186958.694325.109880@o13g2000cwo.googlegroups.com>,
growan@gmail.com says...

>David Tanguay wrote:

>> Or you can answer the phone in the middle of the sequence, and return
>> a half-hour later to find Guybrush's bloated corpse. :-(

>I've always been a fan of "idle animations" -- things characters on the
>screen will do to indicate impatience in an absence of user input.
>Some characters tap their feet or look at their watch -- others blow
>bubbles, yo-yo or read a book. I see that little sequence as akin to
>the ultimate extension of idle animations. (Well over a decade ago, I
>remember having a strategizing conversation with a friend at that point
>in the game when the screen movement in the corner of his eye caught
>his attention and derailed our conversation. "Hey, Nick! I just
>committed a felony!" We nearly soiled ourselves in the revelation that
>/the game was playing itself!/)

The first game I ever saw the "bored character" was Commander Keen. He would
cross his arms, tap his toe, and eventually sit down to read a book.

--
Ken Rice -=:=- kennrice (AT) erols (DOT) com
http://users.erols.com/kennrice - Lego Compatible Flex Track,
Civil War Round Table of DC & Concentration Camp made of Lego bricks
http://members.tripod.com/~kennrice
Maps of Ultima 7 Parts 1 & 2, Prophecy of the Shadow, Savage Empire,
Crusaders of Dark Savant & Others.
Anonymous
May 16, 2005 11:46:16 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.adventure (More info?)

UnwashedMass wrote:

>> But to be honest, I loved to die for example in Space Quest I,
>> the deaths were very funny and so enriched my gaming experience.
>
> Space Quest was a unique case -- as far as I can tell, the primary
> appeal of the series hinged around the ubiquitous potential exotic
> deaths the programmers had cooked up for poor Roger, which is why they

Ich halte es nicht für gerechtfertigt, Space Quest jetzt nur auf
originelle Tode zu reduzieren.
Denn Tode in Adventures waren zu der damaligen Zeit absolut üblich, an
Toden hat sich niemand gestört.
Man erfreute sich stattdessen an der Innovation, dass die Charaktere
sich nun plötzlich durch eine grafische Welt bewegten!
Was ich meine ist, niemand redet z.B. heute deshalb schlecht über
Infocom, nur weil man in Zork regelmäßig gestorben ist.

Keine Frage, dass "Nie Sterben" für die meisten echten Adventurespieler
eine wichtige Verbesserung bedeutete - zumal es den Abenteurer vom
"bloßen" Action-Spieler noch krasser abhob.

Aber "Nie Sterben" war nur einer von vielen Entwicklungsschritten,
sonst wären ja auch alle Adventures vor PnC grundsätzlich schlecht.

Man sollte Sierra Respekt zollen. Dafür das Genre damals (mit den
damaligen Konventionen) mit vielen spannenden und lustigen Spielen
bereichert zu haben.

> deaths the programmers had cooked up for poor Roger, which is why they
> often featured particular and unique dazzling animations and humorous
> scoldings -- I think that someone playing through a Space Quest game
> without dying once would only experience maybe two-thirds to
> three-quarters of the work, love and care put into the game.
>
> (There's a site you may appreciate at http://tmd.alienharmony.com/rw/
> called "The Many Deaths of Roger Wilco" -- aiming to present, through
> transcript, video and sound capture, every different ignoble death
> Roger Wilco is subjected to over the course of the Space Quest series.)

Eine tolle Seite, vielen Dank.
Anonymous
May 18, 2005 3:32:30 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.adventure (More info?)

"Manfred Ginger" <manging@sofortstart.de> schreef in bericht
news:D 6amgt$fs$1@online.de...
> UnwashedMass wrote:
>
> >> But to be honest, I loved to die for example in Space Quest I,
> >> the deaths were very funny and so enriched my gaming experience.
> >
> > Space Quest was a unique case -- as far as I can tell, the primary
> > appeal of the series hinged around the ubiquitous potential exotic
> > deaths the programmers had cooked up for poor Roger, which is why they
>
> Ich halte es nicht für gerechtfertigt, Space Quest jetzt nur auf
> originelle Tode zu reduzieren.
> Denn Tode in Adventures waren zu der damaligen Zeit absolut üblich, an
> Toden hat sich niemand gestört.
> Man erfreute sich stattdessen an der Innovation, dass die Charaktere
> sich nun plötzlich durch eine grafische Welt bewegten!
> Was ich meine ist, niemand redet z.B. heute deshalb schlecht über
> Infocom, nur weil man in Zork regelmäßig gestorben ist.
>
> Keine Frage, dass "Nie Sterben" für die meisten echten Adventurespieler
> eine wichtige Verbesserung bedeutete - zumal es den Abenteurer vom
> "bloßen" Action-Spieler noch krasser abhob.
>
> Aber "Nie Sterben" war nur einer von vielen Entwicklungsschritten,
> sonst wären ja auch alle Adventures vor PnC grundsätzlich schlecht.
>
> Man sollte Sierra Respekt zollen. Dafür das Genre damals (mit den
> damaligen Konventionen) mit vielen spannenden und lustigen Spielen
> bereichert zu haben.
>
> > deaths the programmers had cooked up for poor Roger, which is why they
> > often featured particular and unique dazzling animations and humorous
> > scoldings -- I think that someone playing through a Space Quest game
> > without dying once would only experience maybe two-thirds to
> > three-quarters of the work, love and care put into the game.
> >
> > (There's a site you may appreciate at http://tmd.alienharmony.com/rw/
> > called "The Many Deaths of Roger Wilco" -- aiming to present, through
> > transcript, video and sound capture, every different ignoble death
> > Roger Wilco is subjected to over the course of the Space Quest series.)
>
> Eine tolle Seite, vielen Dank.

....und jetzt noch mal English studieren... ;-)
Anonymous
May 18, 2005 10:25:34 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.adventure (More info?)

On that special day, E-Cie, (WUFX@shutup.au) said...

> > > (There's a site you may appreciate at http://tmd.alienharmony.com/rw/
> > > called "The Many Deaths of Roger Wilco" -- aiming to present, through
> > > transcript, video and sound capture, every different ignoble death
> > > Roger Wilco is subjected to over the course of the Space Quest series.)
> >
> > Eine tolle Seite, vielen Dank.
>
> ...und jetzt noch mal English studieren... ;-)

In other postings, he did write a quite understandable English. I have
no idea why he switched to German, except he received a private mail
from UnwashedMass, which was in German.


Gabriele Neukam

Gabriele.Spamfighter.Neukam@t-online.de


--
Ah, Information. A property, too valuable these days, to give it away,
just so, at no cost.
Anonymous
May 19, 2005 12:00:04 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.adventure (More info?)

Gabriele Neukam wrote:

>> > Eine tolle Seite, vielen Dank.
>>
>> ...und jetzt noch mal English studieren... ;-)
>
> In other postings, he did write a quite understandable English. I have
> no idea why he switched to German, except he received a private mail
> from UnwashedMass, which was in German.

No mail. And I didn't mean to disturb this newsgroup
(being a true adventurer I would not dare).
Sorry, and no more OT-BS from me.

> Gabriele.Spamfighter.Neukam@t-online.de
Anonymous
May 19, 2005 12:00:50 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.adventure (More info?)

E-Cie wrote:

>> Eine tolle Seite, vielen Dank.
>
> ....und jetzt noch mal English studieren... ;-)

Ehrlich, ich hattte englisch angesetzt.
Aber den Versuch wieder abgebrochen: der passive Wortschatz ist
halt doch viel gößer als der aktive (von der mangelhaften Grammatik
mangels Übung mal ganz abgesehen).
Eine Frustreaktion darauf, dass man die postings
zwar wie selbstverständlich mitliest, aber dann, insbesondere
unter Zeitdruck, beim reflexartigen Antwortversuch keine
vernünftigen englischen Sätze erscheinen wollen.
!