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Best eqpuipment to match LynxOne for Home Recording

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October 3, 2004 8:46:48 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

I just bought a LynxOne Soundcard . I want to do some home recording
with my computer. I was wondering what other recording equipment I should
buy to match this soundcard.

I was considering buying a Mackie wz 1402 pro or 1604 pro.

I own two keyboards : a Kawai k5000s and a Yamaha dx7. Aswell as a
Hagstrom II N electric guitar and a Hagstrom Swede Bass. I also own a
Earthworks M30bx microphone.

I was thinking of connecting up these to the mixer and experiment
recording tracks and mixing them on my computer. I will be doing all the
recording on my own . I won't be doing any live group recordings (or it's
very unlikely that I will). It will be for the most part an individual
project. I also would like to use other sources for sounds, effects: like
rack modules, effect boxes, use software synthesizers, samplers, etc.

What should I add to this set up?

A mackie mixer? Compressor? Etc.

Thanks for any advice.

Mark
Anonymous
October 4, 2004 12:51:59 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <TyZ7d.30302$ji3.319467@weber.videotron.net> marcoraicevic@videotron.ca writes:

> I just bought a LynxOne Soundcard . I want to do some home recording
> with my computer. I was wondering what other recording equipment I should
> buy to match this soundcard.
>
> I was considering buying a Mackie wz 1402 pro or 1604 pro.

That will work, but you might consider a really nice mic preamp since
you only need two channels.

> I own two keyboards : a Kawai k5000s and a Yamaha dx7. Aswell as a
> Hagstrom II N electric guitar and a Hagstrom Swede Bass. I also own a
> Earthworks M30bx microphone.

Well, you might consider getting a better microphone, too. And some
decent monitor speakers.

> I was thinking of connecting up these to the mixer and experiment
> recording tracks and mixing them on my computer.

That's the way to learn.


--
I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
October 5, 2004 8:09:19 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Hi Mike,
Thanks for replying.
Do you have any recommendations for mic preamps?
What about connecting up all my gear; could I do that with a preamp with two
channels or will I have to keep unplugging gear? What about mixing the
tracks ; what are the advantages and disadvantages of hardware versus
software mixing? What are the advantages and disadvantages of mixers versus
just mic preamps?

Mark


"Mike Rivers" <mrivers@d-and-d.com> wrote in message
news:znr1096837708k@trad...
>
> In article <TyZ7d.30302$ji3.319467@weber.videotron.net>
marcoraicevic@videotron.ca writes:
>
> > I just bought a LynxOne Soundcard . I want to do some home recording
> > with my computer. I was wondering what other recording equipment I
should
> > buy to match this soundcard.
> >
> > I was considering buying a Mackie wz 1402 pro or 1604 pro.
>
> That will work, but you might consider a really nice mic preamp since
> you only need two channels.
>
> > I own two keyboards : a Kawai k5000s and a Yamaha dx7. Aswell as a
> > Hagstrom II N electric guitar and a Hagstrom Swede Bass. I also own a
> > Earthworks M30bx microphone.
>
> Well, you might consider getting a better microphone, too. And some
> decent monitor speakers.
>
> > I was thinking of connecting up these to the mixer and experiment
> > recording tracks and mixing them on my computer.
>
> That's the way to learn.
>
>
> --
> I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
> However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
> lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
> you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
> and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
Related resources
Anonymous
October 5, 2004 2:09:59 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <KEs8d.73029$ji3.1079969@weber.videotron.net> marcoraicevic@videotron.ca writes:

> Do you have any recommendations for mic preamps?
> What about connecting up all my gear; could I do that with a preamp with two
> channels or will I have to keep unplugging gear? What about mixing the
> tracks ; what are the advantages and disadvantages of hardware versus
> software mixing? What are the advantages and disadvantages of mixers versus
> just mic preamps?

So many questions.

There are well over 500 preamps you can choose from. It's impossible
to consider all of them when making a choice. In every price range,
there are a reasonable number of choices, but the reality is that
there's rarely a single recommendation other than something that a
magazine or newsgroup has adopted as a "favorite." For example, if you
were to want to spend between $300 and $500 for a two channel preamp
and were to ask here, chances are you'd get more recommendations for
the FMR Really Nice Preamp. Ask somewhere else and you'll probably
find a different "majority opinion," but anywhere you ask, you'll find
recommendations for at least half a dozen others that you'll probably
find will be just as good, and that many more who will tell you that
it isn't worth spending that little money, to come back when you're
willing to spend $2500 for two channels.

So pick your price range, close your eyes, point, and buy. You won't
be disappointed.

You can connect the line level outputs of a two channel preamp to the
two analog inputs of a stereo sound card and leave them there for the
next ten years. Record with one or two microphones. If you want to
record with more microphones, you'll need a microphone mixer connected
in place of the mic preamp. Or you'll need a sound card with more than
two inputs, and more than two channels of mic preamp.

The assumption these days is that you'll be recording into a
workstation and using the software for mixing, so there's no need to
use a mixer as long as you're either recording everything in one pass
with one or two mics (a stereo mic setup on your whole orchestra, for
instance) or you're recording multiple tracks one pass at a time, with
one or two microphones per pass.

The biggest argument for software mixing over hardware is lower cost,
with the added bonus of more twiddling capability. The biggest
advantage of hardware over software mixing is that some people just
like it better and can afford it.

A newsgroup isn't a very good place to do all your studying. You
should read some trade magazines for about a year (they tend to
recycle the subject matter frequently) and start hanging out at music
stores that sell recording equipment and find some people who are
using the kind of systems you're considering, pay them a visit and
see how they work.


--
I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
October 5, 2004 5:58:16 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Hi Mike,
At this stage considering that I know very little about home recording I'm
not prepared to spend $2500 on a preamp. But $200-$500 is more in the range
I'm willing to spend on a preamp. And considering I'll probably end up
spending more money on other equipment - I read people into recording end up
buying stuff like compressors (which I'm not even sure what there for),
microphones (shure sm57 an all purpose mic) - this gives me more reason to
budget myself. I don't see why for
example I need to buy other mic's when I have a mic (earthworks m30bx) which
supposed to be a great mic with a very flat response. I've heard people
buying particular mic's because they colour the sound in some positive way.
These are things I guess I'll have to try for myself doing actual recording
and see what results I get and make adjustments along the way by buying new
equipment. Another thing which right now concerns me is having to plug all
my instruments to my soundcard in as simple way as possible without having
to worry about constantly unplugging and plugging in instruments. The sound
quality is off course another concern and I'd rather get the right equipment
the first time instead of wasting money changing equipment. I want to be
able to plug all the instruments I have (which includes 2 digital keyboards:
yamaha dx7 and kawai k5000s, 1 analog synthesizer: an arp odyssey (which I
later plan on buying a kenton midi-cv converter for) , 1 electric guitar -
with a digitech rp1 effects box, 1 electric bass, 1 earthworks m30bx mic. I
don't have any monitor speakers ; I use my Monsoon mm702 computer speakers
to play my instruments through - and the sound isn't that bad through my
effects box it's actually pretty good - I'm suprised . I also own a amd
2000xp cpu, 80gb +30 gb hd's, geforce 2 video card, samsung 19" 955df
monitor, esc k7s5a motherboard with 256 ddr ram, and most importantly a
LynxOne soundcard, I use win98se; I still haven't decided which audio
software to use , but I read that the best choices are either a cubase or a
sonar. To start I'll record these instruments directly to the soundcard
through the effects box. But eventually I may want to buy a guitar amp or
keyboard amp and record the amp with a mic or a mixture of both directly to
the soundcard and through a mic. So anyway, I guess I'll have to start by
fubbling my way through the dark and learn what I need along the way.
So right now I'm thinking either on the mackie 1202 pro or the FMR Really
Nice Preamp . I'm leaning more towards the mackie because of the price and
the seemingly simpler all in one solution; though the fmr probably will give
better sound recording results. But will I be able to plug all my equipment
into these without having to unplug and replug stuff (or this really a
concern) , will I be able to monitor the sound , will I be able to add
stuff - rack modules, effects, etc?

Also, can you recommend any magazines or books on this subject matter?

Thanks,
Mark

"Mike Rivers" <mrivers@d-and-d.com> wrote in message
news:znr1096977912k@trad...
>
> In article <KEs8d.73029$ji3.1079969@weber.videotron.net>
marcoraicevic@videotron.ca writes:
>
> > Do you have any recommendations for mic preamps?
> > What about connecting up all my gear; could I do that with a preamp with
two
> > channels or will I have to keep unplugging gear? What about mixing the
> > tracks ; what are the advantages and disadvantages of hardware versus
> > software mixing? What are the advantages and disadvantages of mixers
versus
> > just mic preamps?
>
> So many questions.
>
> There are well over 500 preamps you can choose from. It's impossible
> to consider all of them when making a choice. In every price range,
> there are a reasonable number of choices, but the reality is that
> there's rarely a single recommendation other than something that a
> magazine or newsgroup has adopted as a "favorite." For example, if you
> were to want to spend between $300 and $500 for a two channel preamp
> and were to ask here, chances are you'd get more recommendations for
> the FMR Really Nice Preamp. Ask somewhere else and you'll probably
> find a different "majority opinion," but anywhere you ask, you'll find
> recommendations for at least half a dozen others that you'll probably
> find will be just as good, and that many more who will tell you that
> it isn't worth spending that little money, to come back when you're
> willing to spend $2500 for two channels.
>
> So pick your price range, close your eyes, point, and buy. You won't
> be disappointed.
>
> You can connect the line level outputs of a two channel preamp to the
> two analog inputs of a stereo sound card and leave them there for the
> next ten years. Record with one or two microphones. If you want to
> record with more microphones, you'll need a microphone mixer connected
> in place of the mic preamp. Or you'll need a sound card with more than
> two inputs, and more than two channels of mic preamp.
>
> The assumption these days is that you'll be recording into a
> workstation and using the software for mixing, so there's no need to
> use a mixer as long as you're either recording everything in one pass
> with one or two mics (a stereo mic setup on your whole orchestra, for
> instance) or you're recording multiple tracks one pass at a time, with
> one or two microphones per pass.
>
> The biggest argument for software mixing over hardware is lower cost,
> with the added bonus of more twiddling capability. The biggest
> advantage of hardware over software mixing is that some people just
> like it better and can afford it.
>
> A newsgroup isn't a very good place to do all your studying. You
> should read some trade magazines for about a year (they tend to
> recycle the subject matter frequently) and start hanging out at music
> stores that sell recording equipment and find some people who are
> using the kind of systems you're considering, pay them a visit and
> see how they work.
>
>
> --
> I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
> However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
> lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
> you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
> and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
Anonymous
October 6, 2004 12:48:08 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <SgB8d.62595$247.1271336@wagner.videotron.net> marcoraicevic@videotron.ca writes:

> Another thing which right now concerns me is having to plug all
> my instruments to my soundcard in as simple way as possible without having
> to worry about constantly unplugging and plugging in instruments.

Perhaps you would do well to get yourself a small mixer. It will give
you workable mic preamps plus a place to plug in your instruments, and
a way to listen to the playback of your recordings as well as monitor
a previously recorded track while recording an overdub.

> Also, can you recommend any magazines or books on this subject matter?

I (as well as a few other regular posters here) write for Recording,
which, if you read it for a year or two, will probably cover all the
basics you need. The Yamaha Sound Reinforcement Handbook has a lot of
information you don't need, but it covers interconnections quite well.

Craig Anderton is one of the best authors for a beginner to start
with. Look for books on the subject of home recording that he's
written. But for the past several years he's been quite heaviliy
involved in dance music production based on loops and has written
quite a bit about that. This may not be terribly useful to you. You
need to find some of his general writings.

--
I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
!