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Pitch-based auto-panning

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Anonymous
October 13, 2004 11:56:07 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Hi people

I'm looking for a VST/DirectX plug-in that automatically does stereo panning
on a track depending on the pitch, so for example low notes would be panned
towards the left and high notes towards the right. I've tried Googling for
'autopan pitch' but haven't come up with anything. Surely something like
this exists; but what's it actually called?

Thanks
Smogo
http://www.psychophile.co.uk
October 13, 2004 11:59:22 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Smogo wrote:

> Hi people
>
> I'm looking for a VST/DirectX plug-in that automatically does stereo
> panning on a track depending on the pitch, so for example low notes would
> be panned towards the left and high notes towards the right. I've tried
> Googling for 'autopan pitch' but haven't come up with anything. Surely
> something like this exists; but what's it actually called?


In real life (hardware), it's called a crossover. But since it's a
somewhat unconventional use for a crossover, there's probably not a plugin
whose specific purpose is to do just that. Jan's suggestion of a pair of
EQs is probably your best bet. Use single-band shelving filters for the
smoothest response. And you'll probably be better off cutting rather than
boosting (that's a guess, based on the assumption that the digital EQ will
behave similarly to a hardware device).
Anonymous
October 14, 2004 4:21:27 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Hi,

Smogo <smogo@nospam-ntlworld.com> wrote:
> I'm looking for a VST/DirectX plug-in that automatically does stereo panning
> on a track depending on the pitch, so for example low notes would be panned
> towards the left and high notes towards the right. I've tried Googling for
> 'autopan pitch' but haven't come up with anything. Surely something like
> this exists; but what's it actually called?

Have you tried using two different EQs on the channels? Boost the low
frequencies and cut the high ones on the left side, and vice versa on
the right side.

HTH,
jan
Anonymous
October 14, 2004 6:47:07 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

<< "Smogo" smogo@nospam-ntlworld.com >>
<< I'm looking for a VST/DirectX plug-in that automatically does stereo panning
on a track depending on the pitch, so for example low notes would be panned
towards the left and high notes towards the right. >>

Well it's not *exactly* that, but the Waves "Enigma" plug in does some
interesting Doppler effects (if given recent arguments here I may be so bold as
to mention the term "Doppler"...) A phrase will trigger a pitch shifting
effect from low to high and you can have that pan across the stereo field.
It's a fun effect...

Or you could just mult your track to two channels, pan them left and right
and record fader moves for the panning effect. ( I have done harder than that,
going through a clave track for a whole song and automating flying faders to
change the accents! A bit tedious, but that's why they call it "work"... )


<G>

Will Miho
NY Music & TV Audio Guy
Off the Morning Show! & sleepin' In... / Fox News
"The large print giveth and the small print taketh away..." Tom Waits
Anonymous
October 14, 2004 7:22:55 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Smogo wrote:

> Hi people
>
> I'm looking for a VST/DirectX plug-in that automatically does stereo panning
> on a track depending on the pitch, so for example low notes would be panned
> towards the left and high notes towards the right. I've tried Googling for
> 'autopan pitch' but haven't come up with anything. Surely something like
> this exists; but what's it actually called?

Not likely. Remember that any pitched instrument contains
much more than the fundamental note or chord it is playing.
It has harmonic content at many times each fundamental
pitch. In a mixed instrument source, you cannot separate
those harmonics from the fundamentals and harmonics of the
other intsruments.

If you do it strictly on a frequency basis, you could get an
interesting effect but any given instument's chord
components and their harmonics would have a left to right
spatial spread.


Bob
--

"Things should be described as simply as possible, but no
simpler."

A. Einstein
Anonymous
October 14, 2004 7:59:26 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Jan Morgenstern <usenet01@wavemage.com> wrote:
> Smogo <smogo@nospam-ntlworld.com> wrote:
>> I'm looking for a VST/DirectX plug-in that automatically does stereo panning
>> on a track depending on the pitch, so for example low notes would be panned
>> towards the left and high notes towards the right. I've tried Googling for
>> 'autopan pitch' but haven't come up with anything. Surely something like
>> this exists; but what's it actually called?

> Have you tried using two different EQs on the channels? Boost the low
> frequencies and cut the high ones on the left side, and vice versa on
> the right side.

I don't think that will do what he needs, unless the sound source is pure
sine waves. Your method will simply spread the various frequencies of
sound across---remember most sounds are complex and contain rich harmonic
detail.

However, he may be able to apply this method if he uses it to trigger
expansion or compression. But that would be a complicated setup to
get going.

Rob R.
Anonymous
October 14, 2004 7:59:27 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

> I'm looking for a VST/DirectX plug-in that automatically does stereo
> panning on a track depending on the pitch, so for example low notes
> would be panned towards the left and high notes towards the right.

Assuming you can achieve such an effect, it's likely it would introduce audible
artifacts as the music moved from note to note.

Is there any way you can write a "panning macro" that would execute as the music
played? A lot of work, but at least you'd get the effect you wanted.
Anonymous
October 14, 2004 10:59:44 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Hi,

Rob Reedijk <reedijk@hera.med.utoronto.ca> wrote:
> Jan Morgenstern <usenet01@wavemage.com> wrote:
>> Have you tried using two different EQs on the channels? Boost the low
>> frequencies and cut the high ones on the left side, and vice versa on
>> the right side.
>
> I don't think that will do what he needs, unless the sound source is pure
> sine waves. Your method will simply spread the various frequencies of
> sound across---remember most sounds are complex and contain rich harmonic
> detail.

I agree that this is a different effect than panning a mono sound
source; however, I figured this would probably the method with the
closest approximation of the desired effect without using non-
trivial means (such as using a pitch detection algorithm to do
panning based on the lowest harmonic of the signal, which would
only work on monophonic sources anyway).

jan
!