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Sound absorbing material - suggestions

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Anonymous
October 16, 2004 4:37:37 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

I have a room that is about 8.5 x 10 with 7' ceiling (drop ceiling) and
ceramic tile. A friend offered to help me with it. He is a carpenter and
says that sometimes apartments have the need for sound treatment, and he
uses soundboard. I suspect the stuff he uses is too light - not enough mass.
So can anyone recommend something? Based on the size of the room, what do
you think it will cost materials-wise?

Some things I have come across are dB Bloc (from www.controlnoise.com) and
various acoustic foam products. What I need to isolate is a loud guitar amp.
I can't imagine foam doing much.

So what do you suggest?

-brian
Anonymous
October 17, 2004 2:42:26 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Brian Huether wrote:

> I have a room that is about 8.5 x 10 with 7' ceiling (drop ceiling) and
> ceramic tile. A friend offered to help me with it. He is a carpenter and
> says that sometimes apartments have the need for sound treatment, and he
> uses soundboard. I suspect the stuff he uses is too light - not enough mass.
> So can anyone recommend something? Based on the size of the room, what do
> you think it will cost materials-wise?
>
> Some things I have come across are dB Bloc (from www.controlnoise.com) and
> various acoustic foam products. What I need to isolate is a loud guitar amp.
> I can't imagine foam doing much.
>
> So what do you suggest?

The average builder's idea of sound insulation is pretty weak. Mass is needed to
block sound effectively especially at low frequencies.

Rockwool make some good sound insulation products from mineral fibre that's
available as *slab* ( the 'wool' is only good for heat insulation btw - don't be
misled by the trade name ).

They have ( or had ) an acoustic control manual that even gives the attenuation
figures vs frequency for their various slab types.

Check this out for starters ......

http://www.customaudiodesigns.co.uk/soundproofing/amw.h...


Graham
Anonymous
October 17, 2004 11:25:28 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Nick" <delonas@NOSPAMcultv.com> wrote in message
news:Xidcd.23806$Fe6.9138582@news4.srv.hcvlny.cv.net...
> I've wondered about trying that. It seems like it'd be hard to avoid
> problems with phase cancellations, though maybe if you get the proportions
> right it works. Don't know.
>
> I have a vocal booth that I've used for the guitar amp and had trouble
with
> phase cancellations in there. I also had trouble getting that sweet,
> feed-backed guitar sound, which is so easy to get with the amp in the same
> room.
>
> My dream would be to be able to crank up my guitar in a giant room with
good
> acoustics, without going deaf. I actually have a room like that in this
> house where you can really turn the volume up and it isn't overwhelming,
but
> other people live here so I almost never get the chance to do it.

If the problem is just other people living with you, rather than sound
leaking to the outside world. the cheapest solution might be to buy them
movie tickets on the days you want to record.

Peace,
Paul
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Anonymous
October 17, 2004 12:30:01 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On Sat, 16 Oct 2004 12:37:37 -0400, Brian Huether wrote
(in article <1097944578.dUl+UrJ//srP52Tu2bSUFA@teranews>):

> I have a room that is about 8.5 x 10 with 7' ceiling (drop ceiling) and
> ceramic tile. A friend offered to help me with it. He is a carpenter and
> says that sometimes apartments have the need for sound treatment, and he
> uses soundboard. I suspect the stuff he uses is too light - not enough mass.
> So can anyone recommend something? Based on the size of the room, what do
> you think it will cost materials-wise?
>
> Some things I have come across are dB Bloc (from www.controlnoise.com) and
> various acoustic foam products. What I need to isolate is a loud guitar amp.
> I can't imagine foam doing much.
>
> So what do you suggest?
>
> -brian
>
>

You're talking about the difference between acoustical treatment and noise
abatement. Foam won't help there.

This is not a trivial job. The best noise abatement is the result of various
applications of D-I-D (Density-Isloation-Density). You need DID between the
noise source and everything else.

Achieving D-I-D is very tricky because sound travels in unlikely ways to
circumvent your best efforts to isolate it.

If he needs the sound of the whole room, the task is very expensive. You have
to float the whole room. If close micing will do, build a small enclosure and
put the amp in it. If there's an existing closet into which the amp will fit,
try floating the closet.

BTW, Sheetblock works in theory.....sort of. I use lead sheeting, acoustlead

Regards,

Ty Ford



-- Ty Ford's equipment reviews, audio samples, rates and other audiocentric
stuff are at www.tyford.com
October 17, 2004 7:29:47 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Paul Stamler" <pstamlerhell@pobox.com> wrote in message
news:I7pcd.1807$OD2.1173@bgtnsc05-news.ops.worldnet.att.net...
> If the problem is just other people living with you, rather than sound
> leaking to the outside world. the cheapest solution might be to buy them
> movie tickets on the days you want to record.

LOL! Yeah I know. It's not quite that simple because my recording studio
is in the basement and the great room is upstairs on the other side of the
house.

I have done that a couple of times as a test and the guitar tone I've been
able to get has been fantastic, but it's quite a hassle moving all the
equipment so I've settled with what I've got in the basement for now. If I
could figure out some way to run a snake and power cable from my amp's
second output to a second cab, I might be able to make it workable.

That might cause problems though. I wonder how long a power cable from amp
to cab can be without losing quality. No idea.

--Nick
Anonymous
October 17, 2004 8:11:52 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Nick" <delonas@NOSPAMcultv.com> wrote in
news:Ldwcd.27740$Fe6.12300511@news4.srv.hcvlny.cv.net:

> I have done that a couple of times as a test and the guitar tone I've
> been able to get has been fantastic, but it's quite a hassle moving
> all the equipment so I've settled with what I've got in the basement
> for now. If I could figure out some way to run a snake and power
> cable from my amp's second output to a second cab, I might be able to
> make it workable.

Sounds like all you need is an assistant and a talkback channel.
Anonymous
October 17, 2004 9:02:30 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Nick" <delonas@NOSPAMcultv.com> wrote in message
news:Ldwcd.27740$Fe6.12300511@news4.srv.hcvlny.cv.net...
> "Paul Stamler" <pstamlerhell@pobox.com> wrote in message
> news:I7pcd.1807$OD2.1173@bgtnsc05-news.ops.worldnet.att.net...
> > If the problem is just other people living with you, rather than sound
> > leaking to the outside world. the cheapest solution might be to buy them
> > movie tickets on the days you want to record.
>
> LOL! Yeah I know. It's not quite that simple because my recording studio
> is in the basement and the great room is upstairs on the other side of the
> house.
>
> I have done that a couple of times as a test and the guitar tone I've been
> able to get has been fantastic, but it's quite a hassle moving all the
> equipment so I've settled with what I've got in the basement for now. If
I
> could figure out some way to run a snake and power cable from my amp's
> second output to a second cab, I might be able to make it workable.
>
> That might cause problems though. I wonder how long a power cable from
amp
> to cab can be without losing quality. No idea.

If it's heavy enough you can run a 50' cable with very low losses, 100' with
a bit more loss. Your guitar cabs don't have crossovers in them, which cause
a lot of the problems. At worst, with something like 12 or 14 gauge cable,
your bass frequencies might get a little heftier and looser.

An alternative: Go up to the great room while someone else runs the controls
in the basement. Just run a mike cable from the great room to the studio,
and a headphone cable. That'll get you a better edge-of-feedback sound, too,
as that depends on having the cab stimulating the body of the guitar.

Peace,
Paul
!