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Bose "Wave Music System": Any Good?

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Anonymous
October 26, 2004 5:01:36 PM

Archived from groups: alt.audio.equipment,rec.audio.pro (More info?)

I've been restoring an old Conn tenor saxophone (from about 1917). The
small shop area I've established for that task could use a small, but
good-sounding, speaker-based (headphone cables can get in the way in
this sort of work) CD player.

Presumably most of us have seen the ads for Bose's "Wave Music System,"
an upgrade of their older "Wave Radio." That would be about the right
physical size for this repair station I have going. Bose of course
claims that it sounds phenomenal, but I'd prefer to hear that from an
actual customer.

Do any of you have any first-hand impressions of the Wave Music System?
If it matters, I mostly listen to classical music.

These ads also seem to avoid telling how much it costs, and some speak
of financing. Do any of you know how much they're charging for it?

--

(Preferably reply to the newsgroup, please. If you reply by Email, I
will sincerely try to receive your message, but it will probably get
buried in spam.)
October 26, 2004 6:58:59 PM

Archived from groups: alt.audio.equipment,rec.audio.pro (More info?)

I think, and many audiophiles agree, that Bose products are overpriced. The
most frequent phrase I hear/read about their speakers is, "Nothing on the
top, nothing on the bottom." That wouldn't be such a damning phrase if they
weren't so pricey. In all honesty, though, I have not heard the Wave Radio
or Wave Music System. I'm not a snob, but I like to get the best bang for
the buck.

My 2 cents worth.
"Gary Morrison" <mr88cet@texas.net> wrote in message
news:QUrfd.1084$lM1.344@fe2.texas.rr.com...
> I've been restoring an old Conn tenor saxophone (from about 1917). The
> small shop area I've established for that task could use a small, but
> good-sounding, speaker-based (headphone cables can get in the way in this
> sort of work) CD player.
>
> Presumably most of us have seen the ads for Bose's "Wave Music System," an
> upgrade of their older "Wave Radio." That would be about the right
> physical size for this repair station I have going. Bose of course claims
> that it sounds phenomenal, but I'd prefer to hear that from an actual
> customer.
>
> Do any of you have any first-hand impressions of the Wave Music System? If
> it matters, I mostly listen to classical music.
>
> These ads also seem to avoid telling how much it costs, and some speak of
> financing. Do any of you know how much they're charging for it?
>
> --
>
> (Preferably reply to the newsgroup, please. If you reply by Email, I
> will sincerely try to receive your message, but it will probably get
> buried in spam.)
Anonymous
October 26, 2004 8:12:16 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On Tue, 26 Oct 2004 13:01:36 GMT, Gary Morrison <mr88cet@texas.net>
wrote:

>I've been restoring an old Conn tenor saxophone (from about 1917). The
>small shop area I've established for that task could use a small, but
>good-sounding, speaker-based (headphone cables can get in the way in
>this sort of work) CD player.
>
>Presumably most of us have seen the ads for Bose's "Wave Music System,"
>an upgrade of their older "Wave Radio." That would be about the right
>physical size for this repair station I have going. Bose of course
>claims that it sounds phenomenal, but I'd prefer to hear that from an
>actual customer.
>
>Do any of you have any first-hand impressions of the Wave Music System?
> If it matters, I mostly listen to classical music.
>
>These ads also seem to avoid telling how much it costs, and some speak
>of financing. Do any of you know how much they're charging for it?

They cost somewhere in the neighborhood of $550. In my opinion. it's a
glorified clock radio. I never heard one, though.
Related resources
Anonymous
October 26, 2004 8:12:17 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Mr Tuvok" <tuvok@vulcan.net> wrote in message
news:3otsn0h1nhvpjt6hghrrrs3ctlj47v3nhr@4ax.com
> On Tue, 26 Oct 2004 13:01:36 GMT, Gary Morrison <mr88cet@texas.net>
> wrote:
>
>> I've been restoring an old Conn tenor saxophone (from about 1917).
>> The small shop area I've established for that task could use a
>> small, but good-sounding, speaker-based (headphone cables can get in
>> the way in this sort of work) CD player.
>>
>> Presumably most of us have seen the ads for Bose's "Wave Music
>> System," an upgrade of their older "Wave Radio." That would be
>> about the right physical size for this repair station I have going.
>> Bose of course claims that it sounds phenomenal, but I'd prefer to
>> hear that from an actual customer.
>>
>> Do any of you have any first-hand impressions of the Wave Music
>> System? If it matters, I mostly listen to classical music.
>>
>> These ads also seem to avoid telling how much it costs, and some
>> speak of financing. Do any of you know how much they're charging
>> for it?
>
> They cost somewhere in the neighborhood of $550. In my opinion. it's a
> glorified clock radio. I never heard one, though.

I've heard them a number of times, and they don't sound too ludicrous until
you look at the price tag. Easily worth 10% of the asking price.
Anonymous
October 26, 2004 8:12:17 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

I haven't heard the current Wave Music System, but the original Wave Radio
is, to put it kindly, mediocre. Not only is the sound unduly colored, but the
speakers are too close for good stereo separation. And it's not cheap.

What's particularly unfortunate about these products is that the KLH
compact systems of 40 years ago (has it been that long?) provided basically
"honest" sound (albeit at rather higher price relative to disposable income),
that is still better than what the Bose Wave products deliver.

I realize you want a single-piece unit, but I haven't heard any (including the
most-recent CSW) that has acceptable sound, even for casual listening. I'd
suggest auditioning some of the mini three-piece systems, especially those
with two-way speakers (ie, a mid and a tweeter, not a single driver). The better
of these are still not suitable for critical listening, but they're okay for
casual listening. (I, too, am a classical listener.) I have a TEAC that's
acceptable. It cost $200 at Costco.

One other point... The current Bose has a slot for the CD, not a loading tray.
This does not strike me as a good idea for a player in a dirty, grit-laden
workshop.
Anonymous
October 27, 2004 2:46:41 AM

Archived from groups: alt.audio.equipment,rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Gary Morrison" <mr88cet@texas.net> wrote in message
news:QUrfd.1084$lM1.344@fe2.texas.rr.com...
> I've been restoring an old Conn tenor saxophone (from about 1917). The
> small shop area I've established for that task could use a small, but
> good-sounding, speaker-based (headphone cables can get in the way in
> this sort of work) CD player.
>
> Presumably most of us have seen the ads for Bose's "Wave Music System,"
> an upgrade of their older "Wave Radio." That would be about the right
> physical size for this repair station I have going. Bose of course
> claims that it sounds phenomenal, but I'd prefer to hear that from an
> actual customer.
>
> Do any of you have any first-hand impressions of the Wave Music System?
> If it matters, I mostly listen to classical music.
>
> These ads also seem to avoid telling how much it costs, and some speak
> of financing. Do any of you know how much they're charging for it?


My brother was in your situation a couple of years ago. Since he once owned
a pair of Bowes speakers 30 years ago that sounded great, he had heard of
the Wave radio and we decided to go check one out at the mall. He was going
to use it in his small apartment. Well, to sum it up in two words: too
expensive. For what you're getting, I don't think it's worth the high cost.
There were several varieties there with prices ranging from roughly $300
(and that one didn't even include a CD player) to the "grandaddy" Bose of
close to $1200. What he ended up doing was buying a compact "everything"
system that had 50 watt output and sounded "ok". I think it was an Akai or
something. Less cost then the Bose, not much larger than the "grandaddy"
and cost 1/10 as much. I suppose if better sound was what you were after,
you could get one of these compact systems and then feed the output into an
equalizer followed by a decent pair of speakers, but then your costs are
starting to climb again.

Good luck with whatever you decide.

John

> --
>
> (Preferably reply to the newsgroup, please. If you reply by Email, I
> will sincerely try to receive your message, but it will probably get
> buried in spam.)
Anonymous
October 27, 2004 2:46:42 AM

Archived from groups: alt.audio.equipment,rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Bose are Shite . . http://www.intellexual.net/bose.html
Get a good used set of Paradigm speakers and hook them up to a good, second
hand amp/tuner. You can get Stellar sound for a few hundred bucks.

Jodster

"John Adams" <adams456yhu8@mail.net> wrote in message
news:ltAfd.10385$ta5.4741@newsread3.news.atl.earthlink.net...
>
> "Gary Morrison" <mr88cet@texas.net> wrote in message
> news:QUrfd.1084$lM1.344@fe2.texas.rr.com...
> > I've been restoring an old Conn tenor saxophone (from about 1917). The
> > small shop area I've established for that task could use a small, but
> > good-sounding, speaker-based (headphone cables can get in the way in
> > this sort of work) CD player.
> >
> > Presumably most of us have seen the ads for Bose's "Wave Music System,"
> > an upgrade of their older "Wave Radio." That would be about the right
> > physical size for this repair station I have going. Bose of course
> > claims that it sounds phenomenal, but I'd prefer to hear that from an
> > actual customer.
> >
> > Do any of you have any first-hand impressions of the Wave Music System?
> > If it matters, I mostly listen to classical music.
> >
> > These ads also seem to avoid telling how much it costs, and some speak
> > of financing. Do any of you know how much they're charging for it?
>
>
> My brother was in your situation a couple of years ago. Since he once
owned
> a pair of Bowes speakers 30 years ago that sounded great, he had heard of
> the Wave radio and we decided to go check one out at the mall. He was
going
> to use it in his small apartment. Well, to sum it up in two words: too
> expensive. For what you're getting, I don't think it's worth the high
cost.
> There were several varieties there with prices ranging from roughly $300
> (and that one didn't even include a CD player) to the "grandaddy" Bose of
> close to $1200. What he ended up doing was buying a compact "everything"
> system that had 50 watt output and sounded "ok". I think it was an Akai
or
> something. Less cost then the Bose, not much larger than the "grandaddy"
> and cost 1/10 as much. I suppose if better sound was what you were after,
> you could get one of these compact systems and then feed the output into
an
> equalizer followed by a decent pair of speakers, but then your costs are
> starting to climb again.
>
> Good luck with whatever you decide.
>
> John
>
> > --
> >
> > (Preferably reply to the newsgroup, please. If you reply by Email, I
> > will sincerely try to receive your message, but it will probably get
> > buried in spam.)
>
>
October 27, 2004 2:46:42 AM

Archived from groups: alt.audio.equipment,rec.audio.pro (More info?)

It depends on how much you want to spend. I have heard a Bose
WaveRadio several times at someone's house. I think it outperforms
it's size pound for pound. It has more bass than you would expect and
sounds nice enough. It seems nice to listen to at close range, which
seems to fit your intended use.

Classical music sounds nice on it. A bit veiled in a euphoric way
without being muffled.

But this thing isn't going to go head-to-head with a set of Magnepan
3.6r's for classical music.

It's like a fancy-sound boom box basically. I think you'd probably
like it. I think they have a money back guarantee. If you're going
to be standing/sitting at the same spot for a long period of time each
day/week, you'd probably enjoy the better sound quality compared to a
garden variety $50 boom box.
Anonymous
October 27, 2004 3:22:50 AM

Archived from groups: alt.audio.equipment,rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <6c38b64b.0410262044.5a4795a7@posting.google.com>, xy
<genericaudioperson@hotmail.com> wrote:

> If you're going
> to be standing/sitting at the same spot for a long period of time each
> day/week, you'd probably enjoy the better sound quality compared to a
> garden variety $50 boom box.

And it's only 24 times as expensive!

See ya
Steve

--
*#*#*#*#*#*#*#*#*#*#*#*#*#*#*#*#*#*#*#*#*#*#*#*#*
VIP RECORDS: Rare 78 rpm recordings on CD in great sound
20s Dance Bands - Swing - Opera - Classical - Vaudeville - Ragtime
FREE MP3s OF COMPLETE SONGS http://www.vintageip.com/records/
October 27, 2004 3:43:07 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Crazy expensive, but the people who have them seem to love them.

My wife's office has one, they all love it.

Not bad for a table radio, the price is amazing though.


--
Dr. Nuketopia
Sorry, no e-Mail.
Spam forgeries have resulted in thousands of faked bounces to my address.
Anonymous
October 27, 2004 6:36:12 AM

Archived from groups: alt.audio.equipment,rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Thanks for the replies. I'll definitely stay away from it!

--

(Preferably reply to the newsgroup, please. If you reply by Email, I
will sincerely try to receive your message, but it will probably get
buried in spam.)
Anonymous
October 27, 2004 3:21:20 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Arny Krueger" <arnyk@hotpop.com> wrote in message
news:D oWdnc9F4Kbx4OPcRVn-hQ@comcast.com...
> "Mr Tuvok" <tuvok@vulcan.net> wrote in message
> news:3otsn0h1nhvpjt6hghrrrs3ctlj47v3nhr@4ax.com
> > On Tue, 26 Oct 2004 13:01:36 GMT, Gary Morrison <mr88cet@texas.net>
> > wrote:
> >

> >> Presumably most of us have seen the ads for Bose's "Wave Music
> >> System," an upgrade of their older "Wave Radio." That would be
> >> about the right physical size for this repair station I have going.
> >> Bose of course claims that it sounds phenomenal, but I'd prefer to
> >> hear that from an actual customer.

> > They cost somewhere in the neighborhood of $550. In my opinion. it's a
> > glorified clock radio. I never heard one, though.
>
> I've heard them a number of times, and they don't sound too ludicrous
until
> you look at the price tag. Easily worth 10% of the asking price.

Arny, that was great. LOL!

bobs

Bob Smith
BS Studios
we organize chaos
http://www.bsstudios.com
Anonymous
October 27, 2004 8:41:00 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Bob Smith" <rsmith@1nospam2.bsstudios.com> wrote in message
news:WJydnQ8gZsGyeuLcRVn-hw@comcast.com
> "Arny Krueger" <arnyk@hotpop.com> wrote in message
> news:D oWdnc9F4Kbx4OPcRVn-hQ@comcast.com...
>> "Mr Tuvok" <tuvok@vulcan.net> wrote in message
>> news:3otsn0h1nhvpjt6hghrrrs3ctlj47v3nhr@4ax.com
>>> On Tue, 26 Oct 2004 13:01:36 GMT, Gary Morrison <mr88cet@texas.net>
>>> wrote:
>>>
>
>>>> Presumably most of us have seen the ads for Bose's "Wave Music
>>>> System," an upgrade of their older "Wave Radio." That would be
>>>> about the right physical size for this repair station I have going.
>>>> Bose of course claims that it sounds phenomenal, but I'd prefer to
>>>> hear that from an actual customer.
>
>>> They cost somewhere in the neighborhood of $550. In my opinion.
>>> it's a glorified clock radio. I never heard one, though.

>> I've heard them a number of times, and they don't sound too
>> ludicrous until you look at the price tag. Easily worth 10% of the
>> asking price.

> Arny, that was great. LOL!

Thanks for helping me break my reputation for being a humorless nerd. ;-)

Seriously, I see no reason to rant and rave about the performance of Bose
equipment. It's easier to say that it is kinda mediocre and then point out
the outlandish pricing.
Anonymous
October 28, 2004 11:16:26 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Arny Krueger" <arnyk@hotpop.com> wrote in message news:<NLudnWZ77tMkmh3cRVn-vg@comcast.com>...
> "Bob Smith" <rsmith@1nospam2.bsstudios.com> wrote in message
> news:WJydnQ8gZsGyeuLcRVn-hw@comcast.com
> > "Arny Krueger" <arnyk@hotpop.com> wrote in message
> > news:D oWdnc9F4Kbx4OPcRVn-hQ@comcast.com...
> >> "Mr Tuvok" <tuvok@vulcan.net> wrote in message
> >> news:3otsn0h1nhvpjt6hghrrrs3ctlj47v3nhr@4ax.com
> >>> On Tue, 26 Oct 2004 13:01:36 GMT, Gary Morrison <mr88cet@texas.net>
> >>> wrote:
> >>>
>
> >>>> Presumably most of us have seen the ads for Bose's "Wave Music
> >>>> System," an upgrade of their older "Wave Radio." That would be
> >>>> about the right physical size for this repair station I have going.
> >>>> Bose of course claims that it sounds phenomenal, but I'd prefer to
> >>>> hear that from an actual customer.
>
> >>> They cost somewhere in the neighborhood of $550. In my opinion.
> >>> it's a glorified clock radio. I never heard one, though.
>
> >> I've heard them a number of times, and they don't sound too
> >> ludicrous until you look at the price tag. Easily worth 10% of the
> >> asking price.
>
> > Arny, that was great. LOL!
>
> Thanks for helping me break my reputation for being a humorless nerd. ;-)
>
> Seriously, I see no reason to rant and rave about the performance of Bose
> equipment. It's easier to say that it is kinda mediocre and then point out
> the outlandish pricing.

I should write a marketing case study on the effectiveness of "spin"
in consumer audio. Bose would get featured hands down.
Anonymous
October 29, 2004 6:46:53 PM

Archived from groups: alt.audio.equipment,rec.audio.pro (More info?)

I've heard they sound pretty good, but they are overpriced
I currently have a pair of bose "mediamate" computer speakers. Paid 98$ for
them, which is about 1/10th of the price of the wave, and they sound really
great
creative sells a nomad mp3 player that holds about 500 hours of music and
comes with classical excerpts, you load it thru a usb on your computer
I have 166 cds on my nomad player and have 20 gigabytes left, I carry it,
listen to it in my car, and when hooked up to my mediamates have a great
portable system of hi-fi quality. Its the size of a paperback book and is
easy to use. No messing around with CDS anymore. I got mine for 219 at
circuit city, which means its cheaper online. I also saw an rca hard drive
based player that has a color screen for showing video for 400 bucks. And
then therEs I-POD which is overpriced but has cool accesories like a
boombox it plugs into
If you dont want one of these then A traditional cd player would plug into
the mediamates . These speakers have two inputs (which can be blended for
some reason, a front headphone jack and exelent bass
Cambrige soundworks has a portable speaker system in a small case. THE
woofer is in the case, you open it, take out the satellites and plug in your
source, theres a place in the case for your cd player, mp3 player, etc.
Now I hate bose with a passion, but they do excell in small speaker systems.
The wave probably sounds awesome, (their clock radio is really great) but
why pay a grand for the wave when a nice little pair of mediamates will do.
Let me repeat, these sound GREAT.
Get these and some kind of source like a mp3 or cd player and you will have
something that sounds great.
Will a wave sound better? Sure! A thousand bucks better?
HECK NO!
"Gary Morrison" <mr88cet@texas.net> wrote in message
news:QUrfd.1084$lM1.344@fe2.texas.rr.com...
> I've been restoring an old Conn tenor saxophone (from about 1917). The
> small shop area I've established for that task could use a small, but
> good-sounding, speaker-based (headphone cables can get in the way in
> this sort of work) CD player.
>
> Presumably most of us have seen the ads for Bose's "Wave Music System,"
> an upgrade of their older "Wave Radio." That would be about the right
> physical size for this repair station I have going. Bose of course
> claims that it sounds phenomenal, but I'd prefer to hear that from an
> actual customer.
>
> Do any of you have any first-hand impressions of the Wave Music System?
> If it matters, I mostly listen to classical music.
>
> These ads also seem to avoid telling how much it costs, and some speak
> of financing. Do any of you know how much they're charging for it?
>
> --
>
> (Preferably reply to the newsgroup, please. If you reply by Email, I
> will sincerely try to receive your message, but it will probably get
> buried in spam.)
Anonymous
November 1, 2004 1:39:23 AM

Archived from groups: alt.audio.equipment,rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Gary Morrison" <mr88cet@texas.net> wrote in message
news:QUrfd.1084$lM1.344@fe2.texas.rr.com...
> I've been restoring an old Conn tenor saxophone (from about 1917). The
> small shop area I've established for that task could use a small, but
> good-sounding, speaker-based (headphone cables can get in the way in
> this sort of work) CD player.
>
> Presumably most of us have seen the ads for Bose's "Wave Music System,"
> an upgrade of their older "Wave Radio." That would be about the right
> physical size for this repair station I have going. Bose of course
> claims that it sounds phenomenal, but I'd prefer to hear that from an
> actual customer.
>
> Do any of you have any first-hand impressions of the Wave Music System?
> If it matters, I mostly listen to classical music.
>
> These ads also seem to avoid telling how much it costs, and some speak
> of financing. Do any of you know how much they're charging for it?
>
> --
>
> (Preferably reply to the newsgroup, please. If you reply by Email, I
> will sincerely try to receive your message, but it will probably get
> buried in spam.)

I don't listen to classical music, but I bought a wave after hearing one
round a friends.

The sound is initially surprisingly good, at very low volumes. I bought it
for background music in a dining room, so it still serves a purpose. Turn
it up, however, and it's a piece of junk. Want to know what it sounds like?
Like any cheap, kids boombox with a bloody silly MAXXBASS (why's it always
two X's?) feature, turned up to the ...err...max. Horribly boomy.

I wish I hadn't bought it really.

J

ps. For a holiday, I bought a philips portable, with mp3, and (admittedly)
a bass boost feature. I had the intention of leaving it at the villa after
the holiday, but stone me...it sounds better than the Bose. Cost about 10%
of the wave price IIRC. There's a clue there somewhere...
Anonymous
November 1, 2004 11:14:12 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Deep C" <DeepC@madeyuppeyaddress.com> wrote in message
news:418569a3$0$22789$afc38c87@news.easynet.co.uk...
>
> "Gary Morrison" <mr88cet@texas.net> wrote in message
> news:QUrfd.1084$lM1.344@fe2.texas.rr.com...
>> I've been restoring an old Conn tenor saxophone (from about 1917). The
>> small shop area I've established for that task could use a small, but
>> good-sounding, speaker-based (headphone cables can get in the way in
>> this sort of work) CD player.
>>
>> Presumably most of us have seen the ads for Bose's "Wave Music System,"
>> an upgrade of their older "Wave Radio." That would be about the right
>> physical size for this repair station I have going. Bose of course
>> claims that it sounds phenomenal, but I'd prefer to hear that from an
>> actual customer.
>>
>> Do any of you have any first-hand impressions of the Wave Music System?
>> If it matters, I mostly listen to classical music.
>>
>> These ads also seem to avoid telling how much it costs, and some speak
>> of financing. Do any of you know how much they're charging for it?
>>
>> --
>>
>> (Preferably reply to the newsgroup, please. If you reply by Email, I
>> will sincerely try to receive your message, but it will probably get
>> buried in spam.)
>
> I don't listen to classical music, but I bought a wave after hearing one
> round a friends.
>
> The sound is initially surprisingly good, at very low volumes. I bought
> it
> for background music in a dining room, so it still serves a purpose. Turn
> it up, however, and it's a piece of junk. Want to know what it sounds
> like?
> Like any cheap, kids boombox with a bloody silly MAXXBASS (why's it always
> two X's?) feature, turned up to the ...err...max. Horribly boomy.
>
> I wish I hadn't bought it really.
>
> J
>
> ps. For a holiday, I bought a philips portable, with mp3, and
> (admittedly)
> a bass boost feature. I had the intention of leaving it at the villa
> after
> the holiday, but stone me...it sounds better than the Bose. Cost about
> 10%
> of the wave price IIRC. There's a clue there somewhere...

My parents bought one. Paid around $400 as I recall. The small credit card
remote was neat, but the sound was horrible for the price they paid for it.
Regular kitchen radio sounded better as will almost any boombox, mp3 player,
whatever.

Oh, they sent it back and did get their money back.

M
November 2, 2004 12:48:42 PM

Archived from groups: alt.audio.equipment,rec.audio.pro (More info?)

I would like to clarify that Waves' MaxxBass is not utilized in any of
the current Bose Wave Radio products. Waves is an audio company with
more than a decade of history in providing audio sgnal processing
tools to the top professionals in music and movie soundtrack. Waves
consistently wins the top pro audio signal processing awards.

MaxxBass is a patented psychoacoustic bass extension technology that
does not use the bass boosts or EQs traditionally utilized in consumer
electronics. You can find more information on this technology works
at www.maxxbass.com. It is now being utilized by several leading
manufacturers in portable audio, automotive, home theater and other
applications.

Waves is offering its own retail products to aftermarket car audio
enthusists. You can find out more about these products with editorial
and customer reviews at www.wavescaraudio.com

Regards,
Paul Bundschuh
VP Sales & Marketing
Waves Semiconductor & OEM Licensing Div
email: paul@waves.com

"Deep C" <DeepC@madeyuppeyaddress.com> wrote in message news:<418569a3$0$22789$afc38c87@news.easynet.co.uk>...
> "Gary Morrison" <mr88cet@texas.net> wrote in message
> news:QUrfd.1084$lM1.344@fe2.texas.rr.com...
> > I've been restoring an old Conn tenor saxophone (from about 1917). The
> > small shop area I've established for that task could use a small, but
> > good-sounding, speaker-based (headphone cables can get in the way in
> > this sort of work) CD player.
> >
> > Presumably most of us have seen the ads for Bose's "Wave Music System,"
> > an upgrade of their older "Wave Radio." That would be about the right
> > physical size for this repair station I have going. Bose of course
> > claims that it sounds phenomenal, but I'd prefer to hear that from an
> > actual customer.
> >
> > Do any of you have any first-hand impressions of the Wave Music System?
> > If it matters, I mostly listen to classical music.
> >
> > These ads also seem to avoid telling how much it costs, and some speak
> > of financing. Do any of you know how much they're charging for it?
> >
> > --
> >
> > (Preferably reply to the newsgroup, please. If you reply by Email, I
> > will sincerely try to receive your message, but it will probably get
> > buried in spam.)
>
> I don't listen to classical music, but I bought a wave after hearing one
> round a friends.
>
> The sound is initially surprisingly good, at very low volumes. I bought it
> for background music in a dining room, so it still serves a purpose. Turn
> it up, however, and it's a piece of junk. Want to know what it sounds like?
> Like any cheap, kids boombox with a bloody silly MAXXBASS (why's it always
> two X's?) feature, turned up to the ...err...max. Horribly boomy.
>
> I wish I hadn't bought it really.
>
> J
>
> ps. For a holiday, I bought a philips portable, with mp3, and (admittedly)
> a bass boost feature. I had the intention of leaving it at the villa after
> the holiday, but stone me...it sounds better than the Bose. Cost about 10%
> of the wave price IIRC. There's a clue there somewhere...
Anonymous
November 3, 2004 4:35:55 PM

Archived from groups: alt.audio.equipment,rec.audio.pro (More info?)

I wasn't trying to imply you used any psychoacoustic bass extension
circuitry. Just that the wave CD/Radio sounds like cheaper boomboxes that
do. It's a very coloured sound that might appeal to some, but I found
better in a £35 portable.

A personal opinion, for sure, but that's what the poster asked for.

Peace.


<paul@waves.com> wrote in message
news:f4bb4c35.0411020948.2642ad98@posting.google.com...
> I would like to clarify that Waves' MaxxBass is not utilized in any of
> the current Bose Wave Radio products. Waves is an audio company with
> more than a decade of history in providing audio sgnal processing
> tools to the top professionals in music and movie soundtrack. Waves
> consistently wins the top pro audio signal processing awards.
>
> MaxxBass is a patented psychoacoustic bass extension technology that
> does not use the bass boosts or EQs traditionally utilized in consumer
> electronics. You can find more information on this technology works
> at www.maxxbass.com. It is now being utilized by several leading
> manufacturers in portable audio, automotive, home theater and other
> applications.
>
> Waves is offering its own retail products to aftermarket car audio
> enthusists. You can find out more about these products with editorial
> and customer reviews at www.wavescaraudio.com
>
> Regards,
> Paul Bundschuh
> VP Sales & Marketing
> Waves Semiconductor & OEM Licensing Div
> email: paul@waves.com
>
> "Deep C" <DeepC@madeyuppeyaddress.com> wrote in message
news:<418569a3$0$22789$afc38c87@news.easynet.co.uk>...
> > "Gary Morrison" <mr88cet@texas.net> wrote in message
> > news:QUrfd.1084$lM1.344@fe2.texas.rr.com...
> > > I've been restoring an old Conn tenor saxophone (from about 1917).
The
> > > small shop area I've established for that task could use a small, but
> > > good-sounding, speaker-based (headphone cables can get in the way in
> > > this sort of work) CD player.
> > >
> > > Presumably most of us have seen the ads for Bose's "Wave Music
System,"
> > > an upgrade of their older "Wave Radio." That would be about the right
> > > physical size for this repair station I have going. Bose of course
> > > claims that it sounds phenomenal, but I'd prefer to hear that from an
> > > actual customer.
> > >
> > > Do any of you have any first-hand impressions of the Wave Music
System?
> > > If it matters, I mostly listen to classical music.
> > >
> > > These ads also seem to avoid telling how much it costs, and some speak
> > > of financing. Do any of you know how much they're charging for it?
> > >
> > > --
> > >
> > > (Preferably reply to the newsgroup, please. If you reply by Email, I
> > > will sincerely try to receive your message, but it will probably get
> > > buried in spam.)
> >
> > I don't listen to classical music, but I bought a wave after hearing one
> > round a friends.
> >
> > The sound is initially surprisingly good, at very low volumes. I bought
it
> > for background music in a dining room, so it still serves a purpose.
Turn
> > it up, however, and it's a piece of junk. Want to know what it sounds
like?
> > Like any cheap, kids boombox with a bloody silly MAXXBASS (why's it
always
> > two X's?) feature, turned up to the ...err...max. Horribly boomy.
> >
> > I wish I hadn't bought it really.
> >
> > J
> >
> > ps. For a holiday, I bought a philips portable, with mp3, and
(admittedly)
> > a bass boost feature. I had the intention of leaving it at the villa
after
> > the holiday, but stone me...it sounds better than the Bose. Cost about
10%
> > of the wave price IIRC. There's a clue there somewhere...
Anonymous
November 3, 2004 4:59:49 PM

Archived from groups: alt.audio.equipment,rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Deep C <DeepC@madeyuppeyaddress.com> wrote:
>I wasn't trying to imply you used any psychoacoustic bass extension
>circuitry. Just that the wave CD/Radio sounds like cheaper boomboxes that
>do. It's a very coloured sound that might appeal to some, but I found
>better in a £35 portable.

In fact, psychoacoustic bass extension would be an improvement, in that it
will provide a false sense of low end extension without impairing the lower
midrange (like the big lower midrange peak in the Bose does).
--scott

--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
Anonymous
November 5, 2004 2:30:45 PM

Archived from groups: alt.audio.equipment,rec.audio.pro (More info?)

The bose is prices at ,,, are you sittng down?
FIVE HUNDRED BUCKS
Thats why they dont tell it
Cambridge soundworks has a clone that is about three hundred, is probably
better built, and sounds just as good, (I've heard both)
And they have a closeout going on right now
"Stephen" <js_eggleston@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:t_idnTIWlajqA-PcRVn-hQ@adelphia.com...
> I think, and many audiophiles agree, that Bose products are overpriced.
The
> most frequent phrase I hear/read about their speakers is, "Nothing on the
> top, nothing on the bottom." That wouldn't be such a damning phrase if
they
> weren't so pricey. In all honesty, though, I have not heard the Wave
Radio
> or Wave Music System. I'm not a snob, but I like to get the best bang for
> the buck.
>
> My 2 cents worth.
> "Gary Morrison" <mr88cet@texas.net> wrote in message
> news:QUrfd.1084$lM1.344@fe2.texas.rr.com...
> > I've been restoring an old Conn tenor saxophone (from about 1917). The
> > small shop area I've established for that task could use a small, but
> > good-sounding, speaker-based (headphone cables can get in the way in
this
> > sort of work) CD player.
> >
> > Presumably most of us have seen the ads for Bose's "Wave Music System,"
an
> > upgrade of their older "Wave Radio." That would be about the right
> > physical size for this repair station I have going. Bose of course
claims
> > that it sounds phenomenal, but I'd prefer to hear that from an actual
> > customer.
> >
> > Do any of you have any first-hand impressions of the Wave Music System?
If
> > it matters, I mostly listen to classical music.
> >
> > These ads also seem to avoid telling how much it costs, and some speak
of
> > financing. Do any of you know how much they're charging for it?
> >
> > --
> >
> > (Preferably reply to the newsgroup, please. If you reply by Email, I
> > will sincerely try to receive your message, but it will probably get
> > buried in spam.)
>
>
Anonymous
November 16, 2004 12:31:10 AM

Archived from groups: alt.audio.equipment,rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <cmb9r5$8op$1@panix2.panix.com>, Scott Dorsey
<kludge@panix.com> wrote:

> Deep C <DeepC@madeyuppeyaddress.com> wrote:
> >I wasn't trying to imply you used any psychoacoustic bass extension
> >circuitry. Just that the wave CD/Radio sounds like cheaper boomboxes that
> >do. It's a very coloured sound that might appeal to some, but I found
> >better in a £35 portable.
>
> In fact, psychoacoustic bass extension would be an improvement, in that it
> will provide a false sense of low end extension without impairing the lower
> midrange (like the big lower midrange peak in the Bose does).
> --scott

Your also paying for a radio that has a capability waaay better then
any broadcast signal is, or broadcaster wants to broadcast. Save your
money. Hire a string quartet for 2 hours.

Posted Via Usenet.com Premium Usenet Newsgroup Services
----------------------------------------------------------
** SPEED ** RETENTION ** COMPLETION ** ANONYMITY **
----------------------------------------------------------
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Anonymous
November 16, 2004 3:38:26 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Gary Morrison <mr88cet@texas.net> wrote in message news:<QUrfd.1084$lM1.344@fe2.texas.rr.com>...
> I've been restoring an old Conn tenor saxophone (from about 1917). The
> small shop area I've established for that task could use a small, but
> good-sounding, speaker-based (headphone cables can get in the way in
> this sort of work) CD player.
>
> Presumably most of us have seen the ads for Bose's "Wave Music System,"
> an upgrade of their older "Wave Radio." That would be about the right
> physical size for this repair station I have going. Bose of course
> claims that it sounds phenomenal, but I'd prefer to hear that from an
> actual customer.
>
> Do any of you have any first-hand impressions of the Wave Music System?
> If it matters, I mostly listen to classical music.
>
> These ads also seem to avoid telling how much it costs, and some speak
> of financing. Do any of you know how much they're charging for it?

A different sort of Bose application, but I participate in a car forum
(Miata.net) and the LS and Mazdaspeed versions of the car come with a
"Bose Audio System".

The people over there refer to them as "Blows" as in "the sound of the
stock stereo really BLOWS."

Many of them pull out the stock stereo, or at least the stock speakers
and replace them, as the speakers tend to rattle a lot without much
provocation.

I don't know how this experience would relate to a Wave Radio, but
when you have people driving convertible sports cars (think top down,
wind noise, fairly noisy interiors) complaining about the quality of
the audio system, that kinda says a lot right there. These people are
into the driving experience of the car, not the stereo system, but the
fact is most of them hate the Bose system.

BUT the reason that so many car companies offer a Bose in their
upgraded cars is because of the name recognition thing.

I think you'd be better off spending less money or better off spending
the same money on something that sounds better.

They have to charge $300 - $1200 to pay for those late night
endorsements by people like Herbie Hancock is what I figure...

Analogeezer

p.s. Another car stereo story, my old boss bought an Audi A4 with the
"Bose System"....as with many Audis the car turned out to be a POS (it
tended to blow all it's oil out of the crankcase at random intervals)
so he traded it on a Honda Accord.

He thought the Bose in the Audi was the shiznit (mainly because like
many middle aged yuppies he's been brainwashed by advertising to think
Bose = Good), but after he bought the Accord he said the stock Honda
stereo in it sounded far better than the Blose in the Audi.
Anonymous
November 16, 2004 3:43:50 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

paul@waves.com (paul@waves.com) wrote in message news:<f4bb4c35.0411020948.2642ad98@posting.google.com>...
> I would like to clarify that Waves' MaxxBass is not utilized in any of
> the current Bose Wave Radio products. Waves is an audio company with
> more than a decade of history in providing audio sgnal processing
> tools to the top professionals in music and movie soundtrack. Waves
> consistently wins the top pro audio signal processing awards.
>
> MaxxBass is a patented psychoacoustic bass extension technology that
> does not use the bass boosts or EQs traditionally utilized in consumer
> electronics. You can find more information on this technology works
> at www.maxxbass.com. It is now being utilized by several leading
> manufacturers in portable audio, automotive, home theater and other
> applications.
>
> Waves is offering its own retail products to aftermarket car audio
> enthusists. You can find out more about these products with editorial
> and customer reviews at www.wavescaraudio.com
>
> Regards,
> Paul Bundschuh
> VP Sales & Marketing
> Waves Semiconductor & OEM Licensing Div
> email: paul@waves.com
>

I find it interesting that a rep from a professional audio products
company immediately puts distance between their products and any
perceived relationship with Bose....kinda says a lot right there,
doesn't it?

Analogeezer

p.s. I have told several people that asked me about the Bose Wave
Radios not to buy them but they did anyway...they must have some kinda
brainwashing odorless gas in their showrooms or something.
Anonymous
November 17, 2004 12:30:28 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On 2004-11-16, Analogeezer <analogeezer@aerosolkings.com> wrote:

> p.s. I have told several people that asked me about the Bose Wave
> Radios not to buy them but they did anyway...they must have some kinda
> brainwashing odorless gas in their showrooms or something.

The Wave Radio is as good as a stereo clock radio thing with 3" speakers
is going to be. It is what it is. It's pretty good for what it is. Is
it worth the price? I don't know. The marketing is aimed at people
who can be pressured to buy something even though they aren't told the
price until after they have paid for it.

It's been a long time but one funny thing happened at the house of the
bass player in my band at the time, in 19mumblemumble, somebody must
have filled out a card with the address somewhere, asking for a home
demonstration of Bose.

Well, the Bose salesman comes over, we're all sitting around, basically
doing our thing, while he gives his pitch. He insisted that we sit in
one room while he played his stupid radio in the other room. We did,
patiently. Then Dan (bass player) had the bright idea to show off our
system (a club PA with JBL stacks, whatever power amps, you get the
idea). I'm not sure the Bose guy ever realized what he was up against:
punks who don't regard a sound system as "quality" unless it's big
enough to play hardcore/metal at a street festival (or big enough to
damage the foundation of the building:-), or who wouldn't have had five
bucks between them.

Funny as hell.

Now, for pro installations, say for ambient restaurant/coffee house
environments, I've heard some Bose systems that were pretty damn good.
A friend bought a house that had a Bose system designed in when built.
It wasn't bad.

It's a $500.00 clock radio. A FIVE HUNDRED DOLLAR CLOCK RADIO.

If I buy a $500.00 radio, it's damned well going to have a TRANSMITTER.

I've heard them. They don't sound much better than the $40 brand-X
stereo cd clock radio that's by my bedside. (Which is surprisingly
good, actually, a Timex.)
Anonymous
November 17, 2004 8:00:14 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

ego2001@hotmail.com (EGO) wrote:

> I should write a marketing case study on the effectiveness of "spin"
> in consumer audio. Bose would get featured hands down.

In case this was not just an idle thought--I think what you propose is
sorely needed, and if you do get it written and published there are
probably quite a few of us here who would like to read it. Please let
us know if this idea moves forward.
Anonymous
November 19, 2004 5:08:08 AM

Archived from groups: alt.audio.equipment,rec.audio.pro (More info?)

i dont normaly dont like bose, but it dosnt sound bad. now if your looking
for lots of bass then this isnt the one but if you want some bass then it
might be good.
<steve99@bellsouth.net> wrote in message
news:_KOid.30610$Om6.8022@bignews5.bellsouth.net...
> The bose is prices at ,,, are you sittng down?
> FIVE HUNDRED BUCKS
> Thats why they dont tell it
> Cambridge soundworks has a clone that is about three hundred, is probably
> better built, and sounds just as good, (I've heard both)
> And they have a closeout going on right now
> "Stephen" <js_eggleston@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> news:t_idnTIWlajqA-PcRVn-hQ@adelphia.com...
> > I think, and many audiophiles agree, that Bose products are overpriced.
> The
> > most frequent phrase I hear/read about their speakers is, "Nothing on
the
> > top, nothing on the bottom." That wouldn't be such a damning phrase if
> they
> > weren't so pricey. In all honesty, though, I have not heard the Wave
> Radio
> > or Wave Music System. I'm not a snob, but I like to get the best bang
for
> > the buck.
> >
> > My 2 cents worth.
> > "Gary Morrison" <mr88cet@texas.net> wrote in message
> > news:QUrfd.1084$lM1.344@fe2.texas.rr.com...
> > > I've been restoring an old Conn tenor saxophone (from about 1917).
The
> > > small shop area I've established for that task could use a small, but
> > > good-sounding, speaker-based (headphone cables can get in the way in
> this
> > > sort of work) CD player.
> > >
> > > Presumably most of us have seen the ads for Bose's "Wave Music
System,"
> an
> > > upgrade of their older "Wave Radio." That would be about the right
> > > physical size for this repair station I have going. Bose of course
> claims
> > > that it sounds phenomenal, but I'd prefer to hear that from an actual
> > > customer.
> > >
> > > Do any of you have any first-hand impressions of the Wave Music
System?
> If
> > > it matters, I mostly listen to classical music.
> > >
> > > These ads also seem to avoid telling how much it costs, and some speak
> of
> > > financing. Do any of you know how much they're charging for it?
> > >
> > > --
> > >
> > > (Preferably reply to the newsgroup, please. If you reply by Email, I
> > > will sincerely try to receive your message, but it will probably get
> > > buried in spam.)
> >
> >
>
>
>
December 6, 2004 5:00:50 PM

Archived from groups: alt.audio.equipment,rec.audio.pro (More info?)

I've had one for several years and I agree with the following post. It may
be a bit overpriced but for its size, decent sound, convenience (includes
remote control) it is not a bad choice. To put my comment in perspective, I
also have a high quality component system which I've had for many years so I
know what good quality should sound like. I also have the similar radio sold
by Cambridge Sound Works for considerably less but have had to return it
several times for repair and replacement. It sounds about the same as the
Bose. I've had no problem at all with the Bose.
Norman



On 10/26/04 11:44 PM, in article
6c38b64b.0410262044.5a4795a7@posting.google.com, "xy"
<genericaudioperson@hotmail.com> wrote:

> It depends on how much you want to spend. I have heard a Bose
> WaveRadio several times at someone's house. I think it outperforms
> it's size pound for pound. It has more bass than you would expect and
> sounds nice enough. It seems nice to listen to at close range, which
> seems to fit your intended use.
>
> Classical music sounds nice on it. A bit veiled in a euphoric way
> without being muffled.
>
> But this thing isn't going to go head-to-head with a set of Magnepan
> 3.6r's for classical music.
>
> It's like a fancy-sound boom box basically. I think you'd probably
> like it. I think they have a money back guarantee. If you're going
> to be standing/sitting at the same spot for a long period of time each
> day/week, you'd probably enjoy the better sound quality compared to a
> garden variety $50 boom box.
Anonymous
December 6, 2004 5:00:51 PM

Archived from groups: alt.audio.equipment,rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On Mon, 06 Dec 2004 14:00:50 -0500, Norman <normanwt@optonline.net>
wrote:

>I've had one for several years and I agree with the following post. It may
>be a bit overpriced but for its size, decent sound, convenience (includes
>remote control) it is not a bad choice. <snip>

Amar Bose's crew just basically reached back to the '40s and
resurrected the transmission line/labrynth bass enclosure, made it
small and molded it into plastic. You pay $20 for the radio, $40 for
Amar Bose's name...a trademark of his products.

Better than the old KLH table radios? Nope. Better than a Sampo boom
box at K-Mart? Yup. At least they TRIED to do something with the
bass back wave, where most all portables were nothing more than a
plastic box with thermal vents.

One really odd portable radio with unimaginable bass reponse came in
the early '60s from GE. Placed against a wall, that damned thing
could produce oodles of good midbass with only a 4" driver! I forget
the model designation of those things, but they're quite collectable
now. Chrome face grille with window screen grille "cloth",
AM/FM/FM-AFC, about 12" x 18" by 5"; black, thick molded plastic case.
My dad had one for 40 years and it NEVER gave a day's trouble. I
never found another portable radio with that much bass, even the Bose.
Some Grundigs came close, but were larger. Oddly enough, I've never
seen another one like it, anywhere.

dB
Anonymous
December 6, 2004 10:37:05 PM

Archived from groups: alt.audio.equipment,rec.audio.pro (More info?)

DeserTBoB wrote:
> On Mon, 06 Dec 2004 14:00:50 -0500, Norman <normanwt@optonline.net>
> wrote:
>
>> I've had one for several years and I agree with the following post.
>> It may be a bit overpriced but for its size, decent sound,
>> convenience (includes remote control) it is not a bad choice. <snip>
>
> Amar Bose's crew just basically reached back to the '40s and
> resurrected the transmission line/labrynth bass enclosure, made it
> small and molded it into plastic. You pay $20 for the radio, $40 for
> Amar Bose's name...a trademark of his products.
>
> Better than the old KLH table radios? Nope. Better than a Sampo boom
> box at K-Mart? Yup. At least they TRIED to do something with the
> bass back wave, where most all portables were nothing more than a
> plastic box with thermal vents.
>
> One really odd portable radio with unimaginable bass reponse came in
> the early '60s from GE. Placed against a wall, that damned thing
> could produce oodles of good midbass with only a 4" driver! I forget
> the model designation of those things, but they're quite collectable
> now. Chrome face grille with window screen grille "cloth",
> AM/FM/FM-AFC, about 12" x 18" by 5"; black, thick molded plastic case.
> My dad had one for 40 years and it NEVER gave a day's trouble. I
> never found another portable radio with that much bass, even the Bose.
> Some Grundigs came close, but were larger. Oddly enough, I've never
> seen another one like it, anywhere.
>

Were those the GE Superadios?

jak

> dB
Anonymous
December 6, 2004 11:01:26 PM

Archived from groups: alt.audio.equipment,rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On Mon, 6 Dec 2004 19:37:05 -0600, "jakdedert" <jdedert@bellsouth.net>
wrote:

>Were those the GE Superadios? <snip>

Circa 1961-64? I am just not sure. I know they were pricey in their
day, but wow, great sound from a small portable box. So-so FM tuner
prone to drift, OK AM section. Had a dial light.

dB
Anonymous
December 7, 2004 12:32:46 AM

Archived from groups: alt.audio.equipment,rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"To each, his own", said the Frenchman, as he kissed the cow.

On Tue, 26 Oct 2004 13:01:36 GMT, Gary Morrison <mr88cet@texas.net>
wrote:

>I've been restoring an old Conn tenor saxophone (from about 1917). The
>small shop area I've established for that task could use a small, but
>good-sounding, speaker-based (headphone cables can get in the way in
>this sort of work) CD player.
>
>Presumably most of us have seen the ads for Bose's "Wave Music System,"
>an upgrade of their older "Wave Radio." That would be about the right
>physical size for this repair station I have going. Bose of course
>claims that it sounds phenomenal, but I'd prefer to hear that from an
>actual customer.
>
>Do any of you have any first-hand impressions of the Wave Music System?
> If it matters, I mostly listen to classical music.
>
>These ads also seem to avoid telling how much it costs, and some speak
>of financing. Do any of you know how much they're charging for it?
Anonymous
December 7, 2004 8:27:13 AM

Archived from groups: alt.audio.equipment,rec.audio.pro (More info?)

>> Were those the GE Superadios? <snip>

I don't think the Superadio appeared until the '80s.
Anonymous
December 7, 2004 1:36:10 PM

Archived from groups: alt.audio.equipment,rec.audio.pro (More info?)

DeserTBoB <desertb@rglobal.net> wrote:
>On Mon, 6 Dec 2004 19:37:05 -0600, "jakdedert" <jdedert@bellsouth.net>
>wrote:
>
>>Were those the GE Superadios? <snip>
>
>Circa 1961-64? I am just not sure. I know they were pricey in their
>day, but wow, great sound from a small portable box. So-so FM tuner
>prone to drift, OK AM section. Had a dial light.

No, they were not. The Superradio was introduced in the mid-1980s, mostly
as a reaction to the terrible performance of most portable radios at the time.
--scott
--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
December 7, 2004 5:17:08 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Well Bose has Paul Harvey, the radio personality hawking these things,
and he can sell an 80 year old eskamo, snow. I think a lot of older
people buy these things thinking they are getting a cutting edge sound
instead of mearly getting gouged.

Kind of sad really.
December 7, 2004 8:35:13 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Pops just moved into a new place and bought the Blows 5.1 Cube system
or whatever. I was quite angry he didn't wait for me to email him back
with a recommendation. I was even more angry when I heard them and how
much he paid. But I didn't burst his bubble. He thought it was "good" I
mean it is Bose after all.

cheers

garrett

p.s.2 Yah VW/Audis are terrible. I have 2 and regretting it. Saddly the
92 is way more reliable than my 2002.



> The people over there refer to them as "Blows" as in "the sound of the
> stock stereo really BLOWS."
>
>
> They have to charge $300 - $1200 to pay for those late night
> endorsements by people like Herbie Hancock is what I figure...
>
> Analogeezer
>
> p.s. Another car stereo story, my old boss bought an Audi A4 with the
> "Bose System"....as with many Audis the car turned out to be a POS (it
> tended to blow all it's oil out of the crankcase at random intervals)
> so he traded it on a Honda Accord.
>
> He thought the Bose in the Audi was the shiznit (mainly because like
> many middle aged yuppies he's been brainwashed by advertising to think
> Bose = Good), but after he bought the Accord he said the stock Honda
> stereo in it sounded far better than the Blose in the Audi.
Anonymous
December 8, 2004 2:49:13 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On Tue, 7 Dec 2004 17:35:13 -0800, Garrett <coxg@usfca.edu> wrote:

>> He thought the Bose in the Audi was the shiznit (mainly because like
>> many middle aged yuppies he's been brainwashed by advertising to think
>> Bose = Good), but after he bought the Accord he said the stock Honda
>> stereo in it sounded far better than the Blose in the Audi. <snip>

I bought a new '92 Cadillac with Blowz in it, mainly because of an
order screwup. So, I got it for the price of the base Delco system.
I got robbed. Single 6X9 for bass, two tiny door speakers, Blaupunkt
head in the transport which could NOT be lined up because of horrid
gap scatter and a really shitty transport. I finally, after three
replacement heads, got one that worked OK. People would ask about the
sound system in that car, and I'd just give 'em the same jingle I've
been giving people about Blowz for 30 years:

"Got no highs? Got no lows! Only midrange...MUST BE BOSE!"

dB
Anonymous
December 8, 2004 12:07:47 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"db" <deanbowlus@sbcglobal.net> wrote in message
news:1102457828.588214.97700@c13g2000cwb.googlegroups.com

> Well Bose has Paul Harvey, the radio personality hawking these things,
> and he can sell an 80 year old eskamo, snow.

Figures, Paul must be about 80 by now.


> I think a lot of older
> people buy these things thinking they are getting a cutting edge sound
> instead of mearly getting gouged.

There might be a market out there - older people who want audio equipment
with exceptional clarity, especially for speech. However, the Wave Music
System's technology isn't how you do that. The biggest detriment to
intelligibility is room acoustics. If anything the Wave Music System goes
out of its way to excite room modes.
Anonymous
December 8, 2004 1:55:48 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On Wed, 8 Dec 2004 09:07:47 -0500, "Arny Krueger" <arnyk@hotpop.com>
wrote:

>There might be a market out there - older people who want audio equipment
>with exceptional clarity, especially for speech. However, the Wave Music
>System's technology isn't how you do that. <snip>

Amar Bose and his minions just don't "get it." His 901 fraud years
ago obliterated intelligibility of the critical midrange due to having
it ride on overly extended cones of cheesy 4" drivers. To add insult
to injury, the sound was then blasted in a bipolar pattern, smearing
it all the more. How people ever considered these things (and some of
his other lulus) to be "high fidelity" is way beyond my
compreshension, other than there was a LOT of money (read that
"payola") involved.

This isn't to say others haven't used the room as an integral part of
their systems. Paul Klipsch did so with stunning results in 1940, but
he only used a 90° corner as the final extension of a roughly
exponential folded bass horn. Top end was, and still is, direct field
only. Refer to Stan Freeberg's "Herman Horn" routine, an obvious poke
at Julian Hirsch of High Fidelity..."The whole HOUSE becomes a big
speaker!"

dB
Anonymous
December 8, 2004 5:56:49 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

DeserTBoB <desertb@rglobal.net> wrote:
>On Wed, 8 Dec 2004 09:07:47 -0500, "Arny Krueger" <arnyk@hotpop.com>
>wrote:
>
>>There might be a market out there - older people who want audio equipment
>>with exceptional clarity, especially for speech. However, the Wave Music
>>System's technology isn't how you do that. <snip>
>
>Amar Bose and his minions just don't "get it." His 901 fraud years
>ago obliterated intelligibility of the critical midrange due to having
>it ride on overly extended cones of cheesy 4" drivers. To add insult
>to injury, the sound was then blasted in a bipolar pattern, smearing
>it all the more. How people ever considered these things (and some of
>his other lulus) to be "high fidelity" is way beyond my
>compreshension, other than there was a LOT of money (read that
>"payola") involved.

Amar Bose gets it. Amar Bose is a marketing genius, who has managed to
figure out how to make vast amounts of money selling cheap equipment at
high prices. First he has figured out that most potential customers have
no clue how a system is supposed to sound. So a system that sounds
radically different stands out from the others in a store, even if it
sounds radically worse. Secondly he has discovered what my psychology
professor called the "Duncan Hines Effect," that a product that sells for
more money is perceived to be better. Thirdly, he has discovered that
making systems hard to destroy impresses the potential customer, as is
adding a substantial presence rise to make things sound more exciting in
the store.

Bose products are all about sounding more exciting for the first five
minutes of listening, because that's what sells. If you listen to a
flat speaker and then to a Bose 901 for a minute or so each, the 901
sound really jumps out at you. Only after a good bit of listening does
the customer realize that he gets a terrible headache listening to these
speakers all the time, and by that time it's too late because he has
convinced himself that he has bought wonderful speakers. If they weren't
so wonderful, they wouldn't have cost so much, right?

>This isn't to say others haven't used the room as an integral part of
>their systems. Paul Klipsch did so with stunning results in 1940, but
>he only used a 90° corner as the final extension of a roughly
>exponential folded bass horn. Top end was, and still is, direct field
>only. Refer to Stan Freeberg's "Herman Horn" routine, an obvious poke
>at Julian Hirsch of High Fidelity..."The whole HOUSE becomes a big
>speaker!"

Yes, but these speakers all predate stereo. Most speakers that are designed
for stereo can't use the corner effects very well, because they have to be
set up for proper stereo imaging in a wide variety of rooms as well. What
is interesting is that while most speaker manufacturers have attempted to
produce a realistic soundfield, Bose has gone out of their way to destroy
the soundfield in the original recording and make a very distinctive sound
that bears no connection to the original imaging. This again makes their
speaker system sound very different in the store, and that's what they count
on to make sales.
--scott
--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
Anonymous
December 9, 2004 6:40:33 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Arny Krueger" arnyk@hotpop.com wrote:


>"db" <deanbowlus@sbcglobal.net> wrote in message
>news:1102457828.588214.97700@c13g2000cwb.googlegroups.com
>
>> Well Bose has Paul Harvey, the radio personality hawking these things,
>> and he can sell an 80 year old eskamo, snow.
>
>Figures, Paul must be about 80 by now.
>
>
>> I think a lot of older
>> people buy these things thinking they are getting a cutting edge sound
>> instead of mearly getting gouged.
>
>There might be a market out there - older people who want audio equipment
>with exceptional clarity, especially for speech. However, the Wave Music
>System's technology isn't how you do that. The biggest detriment to
>intelligibility is room acoustics. If anything the Wave Music System goes
>out of its way to excite room modes.

IMO the Wave Radio is a very cleverly styled boom-box designed for specific
market segments where size, styling and ease-of-use (small size, big buttons)
are primary factors. IOW its a boom-box designed for customers (seniors,
accountants) who could really use a good boom-box but wouldn't be caught dead
withj one. They, in fact, address the sound reproduction needs of specific
market segments that others just didn't bother or care to serve before the Wave
Radio.
Anonymous
December 9, 2004 12:30:13 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

William Sommerwerck wrote:

> I believe it's self-contained, but don't hold me to that. Also, the
new Bose
> depends on its remote.
>

No buttons on the box. What's up with that? I _love_ buttons. The
more the merrier. I rarely use a remote. Bose really has a lot of balls
to sell the lack of buttons as a _feature_!

Joe
Anonymous
December 9, 2004 1:02:36 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <20041208224033.10502.00001133@mb-m25.aol.com> nousaine@aol.com writes:

> IMO the Wave Radio is a very cleverly styled boom-box designed for specific
> market segments where size, styling and ease-of-use (small size, big buttons)
> are primary factors. IOW its a boom-box designed for customers (seniors,
> accountants) who could really use a good boom-box but wouldn't be caught dead
> withj one.

Hey, that's me (except for the part about accountants)!

I have a 30 year old Kenwood receiver in my workshop that I use for
listening to music on the radio when I'm working and also as a
convenient signal source that's more interesting than a tone and a way
to listen to a line level output. The FM tuner section is in bad need
of alignment and it barely works as a radio any more. I don't have
service documentation for it and I no longer have a sweep generator so
I couldn't align it myself, and I figured that a shop job would cost
$100 or so, so I paid a visit to Circuit City the other day to see
what I could replace it with.

Picked up a Sherwood receiver for $75 that looked like it would do the
job just fine. Set it up, found that the receiver was not up to par
(admittedly I'm in a lousy signal area, worse than any of the other FM
receivers in the house. It was OK, I could live with it, but I ended
up returning it. Other than the display, nothing on the panel was
illuminated, and I couldn't read the small dark letters on the black
background so I had to fumble with the buttons. (the "senior" part) It
has a remote control, and I suspect that the manufacturer's idea is
that everyone would use the remote. Fine for the living room, lousy
for the workbench.

Maybe I need a Wave Radio. Does it have a line input and recorder
output?



--
I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
Anonymous
December 9, 2004 1:02:37 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

> Picked up a Sherwood receiver for $75 that looked like it would do
> the job just fine. Set it up, found that the receiver was not up to par
> (admittedly I'm in a lousy signal area, worse than any of the other FM
> receivers in the house. It was OK, I could live with it, but I ended
> up returning it. Other than the display, nothing on the panel was
> illuminated, and I couldn't read the small dark letters on the black
> background so I had to fumble with the buttons (the "senior" part).
> It has a remote control, and I suspect that the manufacturer's idea
> is that everyone would use the remote. Fine for the living room, lousy
> for the workbench.

> Maybe I need a Wave Radio. Does it have a line input and recorder
> output?

I believe it's self-contained, but don't hold me to that. Also, the new Bose
depends on its remote.

Regardless, get one of those little "executive" systems. They cost a lot less,
include a CD player, and shouldn't have any trouble driving your current
speakers. Most have the important controls on the front panel.
Anonymous
December 9, 2004 1:03:14 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Mike Rivers wrote:
>
> Maybe I need a Wave Radio. Does it have a line input and recorder
> output?

Dunno, but I can vouch for the Tivoli Model Two as something that both meets those requirements and has a decent tuner section (and is all analog!)
Anonymous
December 9, 2004 4:21:22 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <znr1102595769k@trad>, Mike Rivers <mrivers@d-and-d.com> wrote:
>Hey, that's me (except for the part about accountants)!
>
>I have a 30 year old Kenwood receiver in my workshop that I use for
>listening to music on the radio when I'm working and also as a
>convenient signal source that's more interesting than a tone and a way
>to listen to a line level output. The FM tuner section is in bad need
>of alignment and it barely works as a radio any more. I don't have
>service documentation for it and I no longer have a sweep generator so
>I couldn't align it myself, and I figured that a shop job would cost
>$100 or so, so I paid a visit to Circuit City the other day to see
>what I could replace it with.

There's a Sam's for it, and I will loan you a sweep generator. With RF
spectrum analyzers now being cheap, I tend to do FM alignment with a noise
source and an analyzer, though.

>Picked up a Sherwood receiver for $75 that looked like it would do the
>job just fine. Set it up, found that the receiver was not up to par
>(admittedly I'm in a lousy signal area, worse than any of the other FM
>receivers in the house. It was OK, I could live with it, but I ended
>up returning it. Other than the display, nothing on the panel was
>illuminated, and I couldn't read the small dark letters on the black
>background so I had to fumble with the buttons. (the "senior" part) It
>has a remote control, and I suspect that the manufacturer's idea is
>that everyone would use the remote. Fine for the living room, lousy
>for the workbench.

Yes, and the RF section is supposed to be connected up to your cable TV
line so the poor selectivity and sensitivity is a non-issue for most
customers.

>Maybe I need a Wave Radio. Does it have a line input and recorder
>output?

You probably need a GE Superradio, actually. No line outs, but you can
get WPFW in Fredricksburg with it.
--scott

--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
Anonymous
December 9, 2004 5:24:14 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On 09 Dec 2004 03:40:33 GMT, Nousaine <nousaine@aol.com> wrote:
> "Arny Krueger" arnyk@hotpop.com wrote:
>
>
>>"db" <deanbowlus@sbcglobal.net> wrote in message
>>news:1102457828.588214.97700@c13g2000cwb.googlegroups.com
>>
>>> Well Bose has Paul Harvey, the radio personality hawking these
>>> things, and he can sell an 80 year old eskamo, snow.
>>
>>Figures, Paul must be about 80 by now.
>>
>>
>>> I think a lot of older people buy these things thinking they are
>>> getting a cutting edge sound instead of mearly getting gouged.
>>
>>There might be a market out there - older people who want audio
>>equipment with exceptional clarity, especially for speech. However,
>>the Wave Music System's technology isn't how you do that. The biggest
>>detriment to intelligibility is room acoustics. If anything the Wave
>>Music System goes out of its way to excite room modes.
>
> IMO the Wave Radio is a very cleverly styled boom-box designed for
> specific market segments where size, styling and ease-of-use (small
> size, big buttons) are primary factors. IOW its a boom-box designed
> for customers (seniors, accountants) who could really use a good
> boom-box but wouldn't be caught dead withj one. They, in fact, address
> the sound reproduction needs of specific market segments that others
> just didn't bother or care to serve before the Wave Radio.

I heard the "Lifestyle" series when it first came out. Sounded to me
like most computer speakers do, though my comp speaker has an odd
quality to the bass that the Lifestyle lacked.

They had a couple of price points below the 901 in retail stores--Macy's
springs to mind, but I may be confabulating. Their mid-priced bookshelf
speakers sounded the best to me, though not worth the price differential
over similar sounding cheaper speakers.

There were several bands in my area (NW Jersey/NE PA/Southern Tier NY)
that used Bose 8-somethings (Looked like the 901, more or less) as the
midrange driver for short-medium throw club applications. Seemed to
work great in the 250-1000Hz range.

But that's not quite how they're marketed.
Anonymous
December 9, 2004 5:24:15 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

U-CDK_CHARLES\Charles wrote:

> There were several bands in my area (NW Jersey/NE PA/Southern Tier NY)
> that used Bose 8-somethings (Looked like the 901, more or less) as the
> midrange driver for short-medium throw club applications. Seemed to
> work great in the 250-1000Hz range.

801. PA speakers on stands. They have I controller that is suppose to
balance the sound. Maybe it dips down the mids so you can hear the bass
and highs (that aren't there)?
Anonymous
December 9, 2004 5:24:16 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <31rceuF3eln4jU1@individual.net>,
Joe Sensor <crabcakes@emagic.net> wrote:
>U-CDK_CHARLES\Charles wrote:
>
>> There were several bands in my area (NW Jersey/NE PA/Southern Tier NY)
>> that used Bose 8-somethings (Looked like the 901, more or less) as the
>> midrange driver for short-medium throw club applications. Seemed to
>> work great in the 250-1000Hz range.
>
>801. PA speakers on stands. They have I controller that is suppose to
>balance the sound. Maybe it dips down the mids so you can hear the bass
>and highs (that aren't there)?

That's basically the idea, yes. The 801 has these little full-range
drivers in there, and it uses the EQ box to compensate for the cabinet
response (which has little top or bottom end). The thing is that the
speaker itself isn't linear, so if you do a sweep at 85 dB it'll look
flat, but at 65 dB it will have exaggerated top and bottom end, and at
105 dB it'll have rolled-off top and bottom end. We won't even talk
about the distortion spectra.

The problem is that the 801 is basically the only thing that exists in
that market that has wide dispersion and isn't a horn speaker. So if you
want a wide dispersion cabinet for low levels of acoustic music in a wide
and narrow room, it may actually be better than the alternatives.
--scott
--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
Anonymous
December 9, 2004 8:12:31 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On Thu, 09 Dec 2004 10:22:57 -0600, Joe Sensor <crabcakes@emagic.net> wrote:
> U-CDK_CHARLES\Charles wrote:
>
>> There were several bands in my area (NW Jersey/NE PA/Southern Tier NY)
>> that used Bose 8-somethings (Looked like the 901, more or less) as the
>> midrange driver for short-medium throw club applications. Seemed to
>> work great in the 250-1000Hz range.
>
> 801. PA speakers on stands. They have I controller that is suppose to
> balance the sound. Maybe it dips down the mids so you can hear the bass
> and highs (that aren't there)?

Something like that. Doesn't the 901 have a similar controller?

For this SR application, all that was bypassed and just run from the
mids power amp.
!