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losing 50% of pings on LAN

Last response: in Networking
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September 2, 2001 5:31:42 AM

Hey hey
I'm in need of some help from some people that are more knowledgeable about networking (in which I am not). I was the person with the winXP networking problem, which was solved; it has a good description of my setup, if you want to check it out:
http://forumz.tomshardware.com/network/modules.php?name...

For those of you that don't, I will explain briefly: I have 2 PC's, connected through a crossover cable. One card is a LinkSys LNE100TX 10/100baseT adapater, and the other is a Netgear FA311 adapter. My OS' are winXP 2509.

Anyway, I got the network setup, using the winXp built in manager, and I have my IP's as 192.168.0.1 and ~.2
I can see the other computer, and even earlier played a very laggy game of Unreal Tourney across the network. The problem is, 1/2 of the ping's I send from one computer to the other are lost, and I cannot browse any shared folders from a remoate computer (explorer just sits there, searching for files). I have the adapters set to a 10BaseT network (not full duplex). If I boost it up to 100 then theres some funny behavior from Winxp, and it reporting cables being disconnected. So, I was wondering, is there any strategy or solution I could go about to fix this pinging problem? I'm not too keen on losing 1/2 of the data I send between the computers =) The pings that ARE successful are very fast, <1ms. Here's a small cutout from a ping report, with the results (over a good 10 minutes) shown at the bottom.

Pinging 192.168.0.2 with 32 bytes of data:

Reply from 192.168.0.2: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128
Reply from 192.168.0.2: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128
Reply from 192.168.0.2: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Reply from 192.168.0.2: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128
Request timed out.
Reply from 192.168.0.2: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128
Reply from 192.168.0.2: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128
Request timed out.
Reply from 192.168.0.2: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128
Reply from 192.168.0.2: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128
Reply from 192.168.0.2: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Reply from 192.168.0.2: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128
Reply from 192.168.0.2: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Reply from 192.168.0.2: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128
Reply from 192.168.0.2: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Request timed out.


The above is just a small snipet, below is the results after 10 minutes (packet loss should equal out to around 50%, from what I've seen on my other ping's over time).


Ping statistics for 192.168.0.2:
Packets: Sent = 177, Received = 99, Lost = 78 (44% loss),
Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:
Minimum = 0ms, Maximum = 0ms, Average = 0ms

Has anyone encountered such behavior? I have finally got my network up and it's super poor performance =(
Help!


-Phil Crosby
http://www.philisoft.com
http://www.graphics-design.com

More about : losing pings lan

Anonymous
September 2, 2001 9:40:14 PM

ouch tuff problem... I've never ever had that kinda prob wit my crossover... I have my IP's set up like yours (cuz of the ICS :)  ) it sounds like the cable isn't crossover so half the bytes gets lost... but i doubt that your that stupid... try setting all both NIC's to the same speed and not full duplex. Also intall NetBEUI and TCP/IP for the network protocols. Mine was all funky with Win2k when I didn't have the static IP's (read my last post) but everything cleared up and now it's all good.. I hope this is what you were looking for :) 
Related resources
September 2, 2001 10:03:53 PM

Yeah, its a serious pain and right now is preventing basically all network use, as who can play a LAN game (supposed to be fast) which loses 1/2 of its pings.

Also, what is NetBEUI? I have TCP IP as the protocal, and client for microsoft networks on there as well. I suppose the winXP wizzard set that up. I know my way around TCP/IP, but not much of anything else.

-Phil Crosby
http://www.philisoft.com
http://www.graphics-design.com
September 3, 2001 3:03:50 AM

If possible, lose the Netgear NIC and swap in one from a different manufacturer and rerun your tests.
That particular Netgear model has caused me all sorts of hair loss (hardware and software problems). Swapping it out has always solved issues for me. Hope you have the same luck too.

Cheers,

Ron_Jeremy

If you loan a friend $20 & never see them again, it was worth it.
September 8, 2001 12:51:04 AM

Hey, it's always smart to check the dumb things first - like have you tried a different cable. Funny things WILL happen if you have a poorly terminated cable, a kinked or pinched cable, improperly seated cable...

If you've done this already, I'd say swap a NIC out and see if you can narrow it down from there. It definitely sounds like a HW problem somewhere, otherwise you wouldn't be getting some successful pings. (BTW - NetBIOS/NetBEUI doesn't have anything to do with pings.)

Good luck,
-hyp

"Let's take the warning labels off everything and let natural selection clean the gene pool!"
Anonymous
September 8, 2001 3:13:12 AM

HAHHAHAHAHAHAHAHAH... "sounds like the cable isnt crossover so 1/2 the bytes get lost"... oh my god... that is the FUNNIEST f*cking thing I have heard all day... thank you so much for brightening my day, I really needed a good laugh... thank you thank you thank you...

and as far as the network problem... are you running any sort of firewall? are both the nics new, and if not... less than 2 years old? I seem to have a problem where my nics all die at about 2 years... I have numerous dead svec, smc, netgear, 3com and dlink nics from over the years... network cards are cheap, I would pick up some new ones... also might want to pick up a cheap hub and ditch the crossover... infact I have a linksys 8 port 10/100 hub new in box im looking to sell for about $80 if you are interested...

www.stoleyourdomain.com $12 a year domain registration! whoo! go SYD!
Anonymous
September 20, 2001 12:25:58 AM

netbeui is an insecure and inneficient protocol MS invented for small networks... it broadcasts packets to speed up the "searching network neighborhood" process... I would NOT recommend using it, but it can be convenient... it would not explain your packet loss

www.stoleyourdomain.com $12 a year domain registration! whoo! go SYD!
February 29, 2012 12:44:51 PM

Philisoft said:
Hey hey
I'm in need of some help from some people that are more knowledgeable about networking (in which I am not). I was the person with the winXP networking problem, which was solved; it has a good description of my setup, if you want to check it out:
http://forumz.tomshardware.com/network/modules.php?name...

For those of you that don't, I will explain briefly: I have 2 PC's, connected through a crossover cable. One card is a LinkSys LNE100TX 10/100baseT adapater, and the other is a Netgear FA311 adapter. My OS' are winXP 2509.

Anyway, I got the network setup, using the winXp built in manager, and I have my IP's as 192.168.0.1 and ~.2
I can see the other computer, and even earlier played a very laggy game of Unreal Tourney across the network. The problem is, 1/2 of the ping's I send from one computer to the other are lost, and I cannot browse any shared folders from a remoate computer (explorer just sits there, searching for files). I have the adapters set to a 10BaseT network (not full duplex). If I boost it up to 100 then theres some funny behavior from Winxp, and it reporting cables being disconnected. So, I was wondering, is there any strategy or solution I could go about to fix this pinging problem? I'm not too keen on losing 1/2 of the data I send between the computers =) The pings that ARE successful are very fast, <1ms. Here's a small cutout from a ping report, with the results (over a good 10 minutes) shown at the bottom.

Pinging 192.168.0.2 with 32 bytes of data:

Reply from 192.168.0.2: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128
Reply from 192.168.0.2: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128
Reply from 192.168.0.2: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Reply from 192.168.0.2: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128
Request timed out.
Reply from 192.168.0.2: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128
Reply from 192.168.0.2: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128
Request timed out.
Reply from 192.168.0.2: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128
Reply from 192.168.0.2: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128
Reply from 192.168.0.2: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Reply from 192.168.0.2: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128
Reply from 192.168.0.2: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Reply from 192.168.0.2: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128
Reply from 192.168.0.2: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Request timed out.


The above is just a small snipet, below is the results after 10 minutes (packet loss should equal out to around 50%, from what I've seen on my other ping's over time).


Ping statistics for 192.168.0.2:
Packets: Sent = 177, Received = 99, Lost = 78 (44% loss),
Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:
Minimum = 0ms, Maximum = 0ms, Average = 0ms

Has anyone encountered such behavior? I have finally got my network up and it's super poor performance =(
Help!


-Phil Crosby
http://www.philisoft.com
http://www.graphics-design.com


You may have two of the same ip assigned and traffic is being split.
February 29, 2012 3:26:03 PM

Check the Duplex on the NICs. Try setting them to 100/full or another speed, but make sure you're on Full duplex, not half.
February 29, 2012 11:22:01 PM

Alright, i encountered this before. If you mentioned that you changed the speed of the adapter to 100mbps and it shows cable unplugged, you might try to set it to auto, or, to 10mbps but full duplex.

My problem was some sort like yours, so i changed the PC's speed to 10mbps full duplex and it worked without time out all the way up till now. Been awhile since i've heard anything about that having connection break down. =)
!