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external sound card for digital DAT to PC transfer

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Anonymous
October 31, 2004 4:01:12 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

I need a professional external sound card to digitally transfer recordings
from a portable DAT player (with a 7-pin I/O jack) to PC. Would appreciate a
suggestion. Private replies welcome - Noam
Anonymous
October 31, 2004 4:01:13 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <sm5hd.36546$4C.10369044@twister.nyc.rr.com> noameitan_nospam!!!@yahoo.com writes:

> I need a professional external sound card to digitally transfer recordings
> from a portable DAT player (with a 7-pin I/O jack) to PC. Would appreciate a
> suggestion. Private replies welcome - Noam

The card is easy - just about any one will do. Do you want a real
"card" (that plugs into the PCI bus of a computer) or do you want an
"interface" that connects to the computer through a Firewire or USB
port? Any one of a large pool that has a coaxial S/PDIF input will do
the job adequately. Pick your price and convenience level.

The cable to connect to the digital I/O connector on yhour DAT
recorder is a bit harder to find. Here's a link to a reliable source
(Oade Brothers). Better be sitting down when you check the price. You
may decide that your recordings aren't so pristine that you have to
make a digital transfer. You can make an analog transfer to the sound
card that's almost certainly in your computer using nothing more than
a little care and a $5 cable (which you may already have).

Either way the transfer will be real-time. No click-and-drag files
with a DAT.




--
I'm really Mike Rivers - (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
Anonymous
October 31, 2004 9:50:35 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

> > I need a professional external sound card to digitally transfer
recordings
> > from a portable DAT player (with a 7-pin I/O jack) to PC. Would
appreciate a
> > suggestion. Private replies welcome - Noam
>
> The card is easy - just about any one will do. Do you want a real
> "card" (that plugs into the PCI bus of a computer) or do you want an
> "interface" that connects to the computer through a Firewire or USB
> port? Any one of a large pool that has a coaxial S/PDIF input will do
> the job adequately. Pick your price and convenience level.

I concur.

> The cable to connect to the digital I/O connector on yhour DAT
> recorder is a bit harder to find. Here's a link to a reliable source
> (Oade Brothers). Better be sitting down when you check the price. You
> may decide that your recordings aren't so pristine that you have to
> make a digital transfer. You can make an analog transfer to the sound
> card that's almost certainly in your computer using nothing more than
> a little care and a $5 cable (which you may already have).

You can do digital transfers using a homemade cable. Cut an end off a
composite video cable, strip back the outer casing about 1", twist the
shielding wire into a straight line, cover it with tape or preferably
heat-shrink tubing, leave 1/16" of bare wire exposed. Clip two 1/4"
trimmings off an acoustic guitar's G string (the thickest of the non-wound
strings) to act as contact pins, solder them on to the wires. Connect the
signal cable to the top-left hole of the 7-pin jack, the shield to the
middle of the bottom 3 holes. The signal is not standard S/PDIF spec, but
AFAIK all current coax digital inputs accept it.

The video cable should be a little stiff (solid core), otherwise any audio
cable with an RCA plug will work.

> Either way the transfer will be real-time. No click-and-drag files
> with a DAT.

Spoken like a fellow NJB3 owner ;) 

Transfer what you have on DAT to your computer then sell the recorder and
the sound card in favor of a Nomad Jukebox 3. You'll thank us the first
time you transfer a 2-hour recording to the computer in 5 minutes over
Firewire and don't have to buy more batteries or tapes. Ever.
Related resources
Anonymous
November 1, 2004 2:51:03 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

> The card is easy - just about any one will do. Do you want a real
> "card" (that plugs into the PCI bus of a computer) or do you want an
> "interface" that connects to the computer through a Firewire or USB
> port? Any one of a large pool that has a coaxial S/PDIF input will do
> the job adequately. Pick your price and convenience level.

I need an "interface", because I don't know how to open a computer and
install cards.

> The cable to connect to the digital I/O connector on yhour DAT
> recorder is a bit harder to find. Here's a link to a reliable source
> (Oade Brothers). Better be sitting down when you check the price.

I can get it from core-sound for $45 (not rugged), but they all have a
coaxial RCA connection, so I need an "interface" with a coax (RCA) inputs.
Do these interfaces come with software to complete the DAT-to-CD transfer?

http://www.core-sound.com/7-pin-coax-blurb.html#INTRODU...

>You may decide that your recordings aren't so pristine that you have to
> make a digital transfer.

They are pristine - seriously. The other options I am considering is simply
connecting the DAT (through the SONY 7 pin) to the
coax (RCA) input of the Alesis Masterlink ($800)
http://www.alesis.com/products/ml9600/

OR

connecting the DAT to the optical input of a standalone CD recorder (or into
the coax RCA input - if there is one).

What do you think about these options?

thanks for the (coax/optical) input - Noam
Anonymous
November 1, 2004 3:03:24 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

> Transfer what you have on DAT to your computer then sell the recorder and
> the sound card in favor of a Nomad Jukebox 3. You'll thank us the first
> time you transfer a 2-hour recording to the computer in 5 minutes over
> Firewire and don't have to buy more batteries or tapes. Ever.

The Nomad Jukebox 3 has a microphone jack? Does this it employ obligatory
AGC (Automatic Gain Control)? That
would be a big drawback.
2) What is the quality of the preamp? Is it as poor as most minidiscs, or is
it DAT quality? How easy is it to set recording volume levels manually?
3) How well does it work with external mics, are there different mic input
settings (like High and Low (-20db) to avoid brickwalling?

Can this thing really compete with DAT for live high quality recordings

Noam
Anonymous
November 1, 2004 11:24:48 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Noam" <noameitan_nospam!!!@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:g3fhd.109991$Ot3.107286@twister.nyc.rr.com
>> Transfer what you have on DAT to your computer then sell the
>> recorder and the sound card in favor of a Nomad Jukebox 3. You'll
>> thank us the first time you transfer a 2-hour recording to the
>> computer in 5 minutes over Firewire and don't have to buy more
>> batteries or tapes. Ever.

Rather than just posting "what he said" to Sugarite's factual post, let me
confirm his claims in my own words:

> The Nomad Jukebox 3 has a microphone jack?

NO.

> Does this it employ obligatory AGC (Automatic Gain Control)?

NO.

>That would be a big drawback.

Agreed.

> 2) What is the quality of the preamp?

There is no mic preamp in a NJB3. Its line input performs near the
theoretical limits of the 16/44 format if you run it near 0 dB gain. It's
digital input performs even better.

> How easy is it to set recording volume levels manually?

I don't set levels on my NJB3, I just set its record gain for 0 dB and set
levels on my Behr MXB 1002.

>3) How well does it work with external mics, are there different mic input
>settings (like High and Low (-20db) to
> avoid brickwalling?

Read my lips - if you want to do legitimate recording with a NJB3, just get
a good small mixer.

If you want to go bootleg, pay lots more bucks for dedicated mic preamps
that have far less flexibility, but do have the desired smaller size.

> Can this thing really compete with DAT for live high quality recordings

No doubt. Plus the NJB3 is a ton more convenient than DAT if you want to do
quality work. To me quality work in live recording means touching up the
recording using DAW sofware on a computer. You can move recorded files off a
NJB3 and into a comptuer a lot faster than real time, unlike a DAT.

A NJB3 has two types of modes of recording - .wav file format for exacting
work like a DAT, and high-bitrate MP3 format like a MD recorder.

You can handle far longer recording sessions with a NJB3.

As long as you keep the environmental shock and vibration within reason, the
NJB3's hard drive is vastly more reliable than DAT tapes, and far more
resuable. Dust and dirt is far less of an issue with the NJB3 because the
critical guts are sealed.. Plus, NJB3s are dirt cheap, as B-stock direct
from the manufacturer on eBay.

If you start trying to estimate how many DAT tapes worth of recording time
there is on a 20 GB NJB3 hard drive in .wav file format, or how many MD
discs worth of recording there are in MP3 format, you'll probably be truely
amazed. And if you are handy with tools or lucky on eBay, a 60 GB NJB3 is
not beyond reason.
Anonymous
November 1, 2004 12:50:34 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <HTehd.109990$Ot3.89160@twister.nyc.rr.com> noameitan_nospam!!!@yahoo.com writes:

> I can get it from core-sound for $45 (not rugged), but they all have a
> coaxial RCA connection, so I need an "interface" with a coax (RCA) inputs.
> Do these interfaces come with software to complete the DAT-to-CD transfer?

Lots. About the simplest and least expensive is from Edirol. UD-1A or
something like that. Look on their web site.

> They are pristine - seriously. The other options I am considering is simply
> connecting the DAT (through the SONY 7 pin) to the
> coax (RCA) input of the Alesis Masterlink ($800)
>
> OR
>
> connecting the DAT to the optical input of a standalone CD recorder (or into
> the coax RCA input - if there is one).

You can't connect a coax output to an optical input and vice versa
unless you put an adapter in line. Those aren't that expensive but
it's an extra piece. Either a Masterlink or stand-alone CD player will
work fine, too. Pay your money and take your choice. No particular
reason to use one over the other, or over your computer other than
convenience.



--
I'm really Mike Rivers - (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
Anonymous
November 2, 2004 8:50:11 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

>> I can get it from core-sound for $45 (not rugged), but they all have a
>> coaxial RCA connection, so I need an "interface" with a coax (RCA)
>> inputs.
>> Do these interfaces come with software to complete the DAT-to-CD
>> transfer?
>
> Lots. About the simplest and least expensive is from Edirol. UD-1A or
> something like that. Look on their web site.

I'm going to order the M-Audio's Audiophile USB Digital I/O interface from
Core Sound (http://www.core-sound.com/audiophile_usb.html), the best price
on-line (I need an interface with a coaxial input, the only way to transfer
from 7-pin, as 7-pin to optical are no longer made by anyone).

This is what I was told about the Nomad Jukebox 3: sound is DAT quality, you
pretty much have to use an external preamp for decent classical sound, and
the input jack is notoriously flaky. Setting it up properly to record is
tricky (meters are not good, implemented in an upgrade to the firmware),
many prefer to use an external preamp/AD converter to bypass all the
internal stuff. Some have an issue with reliability, though others claim
to have it running dependably.
The batteries are proprietary and hard to find, and some people have
trouble getting the full life out of them. - Noam
!