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Moving to Canada?

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Anonymous
November 4, 2004 8:39:03 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Unhappy Democrats Must Wait to Get Into Canada

Wed Nov 3, 2004 02:41 PM ET

By David Ljunggren

OTTAWA (Reuters) - Disgruntled Democrats seeking a safe Canadian haven after
President Bush won Tuesday's election should not pack their bags just yet.

Canadian officials made clear on Wednesday that any U.S. citizens so fed up
with Bush that they want to make a fresh start up north would have to stand in
line like any other would-be immigrants -- a wait that can take up to a year.

"Let me tell you -- if they're hard-working honest people, there's a process,
and let them apply," Immigration Minister Judy Sgro told Reuters.

Asked whether American applicants would get special treatment, she replied:
"No, they'll join the crowd like all the other people who want to come to
Canada."

There are anywhere from 600,000 to a million Americans living in Canada, which
leans more to the left than the United States and has traditionally favored the
Democrats over the Republicans.

But statistics show a gradual decline in U.S. citizens coming to work and live
in Canada, which has an ailing health care system and relatively high levels of
personal taxation.

Government officials, real estate brokers and Democrat activists said that
while some Americans might talk about moving to Canada rather than living with
a new Bush administration, they did not expect a mass influx.

"It's one thing to say 'I'm leaving for Canada' and quite another to actually
find a job here and wonder about where you're going to live and where the
children are going to go to school," said one official.

Roger King of the Toronto-based Democrats Abroad group said he had heard
nothing about a possible exodus of party members.

"I imagine most committed Democrats will want to stay in the United States and
continue being politically active there," he said.

Americans seeking to immigrate can apply to become permanent citizens of
Canada, a process that often takes a year. Becoming a full citizen takes a
further three years.   "

http://www.reuters.com/newsArticle.jhtml?type=domesticN...

Will Miho
NY Music & TV Audio Guy
Audioist 4 Fox News
"The large print giveth and the small print taketh away..." Tom Waits

More about : moving canada

Anonymous
November 4, 2004 10:16:18 AM

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Captain,
I am real comfortable in beer-soaked flannel, but do I have to eat all
those sissy riche sauces n' stuff?
More ME in the mix!
Anonymous
November 4, 2004 10:44:10 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"WillStG" <willstg@aol.comnospam> wrote in message
news:20041104003903.21945.00000073@mb-m06.aol.com

> There are anywhere from 600,000 to a million Americans living in
> Canada, which leans more to the left than the United States and has
> traditionally favored the Democrats over the Republicans.

Yeah, the Canadians have leaned left, right into nationalized medical care
economic hell.

> But statistics show a gradual decline in U.S. citizens coming to work
> and live in Canada, which has an ailing health care system and
> relatively high levels of personal taxation.

People who live in border cities like Detroit probably have more real world
experience with life in Canada than anybody else but actual Canadians.

There are so many Canadians and ex-Canadians in the Detroit area that most
Detroiters have a little or a lot of a Canaidan accent, eh?

A high percentage of the people who live in border cities like Detroit
either still are Canadians or were Canadians earlier in their lives.

Many of my co-workers have been folks who come over the border every day to
work here. If you stand at the exit to the tunnel or the bridge any wekk day
morning, the passenger car traffic has a distinct US-bound direction to it.

At times some people in the US would drive to Canada to buy gas or luxury
items. Not so much today. Not for the gas at all.

My wife's great-grandparents immigrated to the US from Canada, and my
daughter-in-law's grandparents were also Canadian immigrants.

Michigan's current governor was born in Canada. Pundits have noted that she
can't be the US's first female president.

A big chunk of post WW2 european immigrants came to Canada first, and then
immigrated to the US. A lot of recent immigrants from the Pacific rim
followed a similar path. In their minds, Caanda was a nice place to stay
until they could finish the job of immigration to the US.

We love Canada and Canadians, but we live in the US!

What's to say about Canada except that it's a great place to visit,
vacation, and perhaps even live for a while, but in a great many people's
minds (namely all those tens of thousands and hundreds of thousands
Canadian immigrants who are now US citizens), it lacks the standard of
living of the US.

Being a lover of the out-of-doors I vacation in Canada just about every
chance I get. Great place to visit but...
Related resources
Anonymous
November 4, 2004 11:50:41 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

> What's to say about Canada except that it's a great place to visit,
> vacation, and perhaps even live for a while, but in a great many people's
> minds (namely all those tens of thousands and hundreds of thousands
> Canadian immigrants who are now US citizens), it lacks the standard of
> living of the US.


I think it has more to with warm air in the winter than a lower standard of
living
Anonymous
November 4, 2004 11:55:00 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Don Nafe" <dnafe@magma.ca> wrote in message
news:KMqdnZZZ_J0trhfcRVn-gw@rogers.com

>> What's to say about Canada except that it's a great place to visit,
>> vacation, and perhaps even live for a while, but in a great many
>> people's minds (namely all those tens of thousands and hundreds of
>> thousands Canadian immigrants who are now US citizens), it lacks the
>> standard of living of the US.

> I think it has more to with warm air in the winter than a lower
> standard of living

There is virtually no difference between the weather in Windsor, Ontario and
the rest of the Detroit area. In fact, the weather is a tad milder in
Ontario's "Sun Kitchen" than in most of Michigan. They even grow tobacco in
Ontario a bit east of Windsor. This does not seem to hinder immigration from
Ontario into Michigan, not one one little bit.
November 4, 2004 12:46:37 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

WillStG wrote:

> D-U-M-B-A-S-S O-R-I-G-I-N-A-L O-F-F-T-O-P-I-C
> P-O-S-T-E-R . . .


And:


> Unhappy Democrats Must Wait to Get Into Canada
>
> Wed Nov 3, 2004 02:41 PM ET
>
> By David Ljunggren
>
> OTTAWA (Reuters) - Disgruntled Democrats seeking a safe Canadian haven after
> President Bush won Tuesday's election should not pack their bags just yet.
>
> Canadian officials made clear on Wednesday that any U.S. citizens so fed up
> with Bush that they want to make a fresh start up north would have to stand in
> line like any other would-be immigrants -- a wait that can take up to a year.
>
> "Let me tell you -- if they're hard-working honest people, there's a process,
> and let them apply," Immigration Minister Judy Sgro told Reuters.
>
> Asked whether American applicants would get special treatment, she replied:
> "No, they'll join the crowd like all the other people who want to come to
> Canada."
>
> There are anywhere from 600,000 to a million Americans living in Canada, which
> leans more to the left than the United States and has traditionally favored the
> Democrats over the Republicans.
>
> But statistics show a gradual decline in U.S. citizens coming to work and live
> in Canada, which has an ailing health care system and relatively high levels of
> personal taxation.
>
> Government officials, real estate brokers and Democrat activists said that
> while some Americans might talk about moving to Canada rather than living with
> a new Bush administration, they did not expect a mass influx.
>
> "It's one thing to say 'I'm leaving for Canada' and quite another to actually
> find a job here and wonder about where you're going to live and where the
> children are going to go to school," said one official.
>
> Roger King of the Toronto-based Democrats Abroad group said he had heard
> nothing about a possible exodus of party members.
>
> "I imagine most committed Democrats will want to stay in the United States and
> continue being politically active there," he said.
>
> Americans seeking to immigrate can apply to become permanent citizens of
> Canada, a process that often takes a year. Becoming a full citizen takes a
> further three years. "
>
> http://www.reuters.com/newsArticle.jhtml?type=domesticN...
>
> Will Miho
> NY Music & TV Audio Guy
> Audioist 4 Fox News
> "The large print giveth and the small print taketh away..." Tom Waits
>
>
>
Anonymous
November 4, 2004 1:42:50 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Besides, here in Windsor, we're south of Detroit anyway.

And the beer's better too...
Even if the Casino is not.

>There is virtually no difference between the weather in Windsor, Ontario and
>the rest of the Detroit area. In fact, the weather is a tad milder in
>Ontario's "Sun Kitchen" than in most of Michigan. They even grow tobacco in
>Ontario a bit east of Windsor. This does not seem to hinder immigration from
>Ontario into Michigan, not one one little bit.
>
Anonymous
November 4, 2004 2:04:52 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Larry Pohjola" <lpohjola@mnsi.net> wrote in message
news:ncjko0hqvq1e4qsgj0rgiuohq58q658u25@4ax.com

> Besides, here in Windsor, we're south of Detroit anyway.

Well you're south of my part of Detroit, but not all of it.

> And the beer's better too...

That's a matter of opinion.

> Even if the Casino is not.

I have no personal experience to go on.

>> There is virtually no difference between the weather in Windsor,
>> Ontario and the rest of the Detroit area. In fact, the weather is a
>> tad milder in Ontario's "Sun Kitchen" than in most of Michigan. They
>> even grow tobacco in Ontario a bit east of Windsor. This does not
>> seem to hinder immigration from Ontario into Michigan, not one one
>> little bit.
Anonymous
November 4, 2004 2:14:13 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Arny, you live in the Detroit area?

Arny Krueger wrote:
>"Larry Pohjola" <lpohjola@mnsi.net> wrote in message
>news:ncjko0hqvq1e4qsgj0rgiuohq58q658u25@4ax.com
>
>>Besides, here in Windsor, we're south of Detroit anyway.
>
> Well you're south of my part of Detroit, but not all of it.
....
Anonymous
November 4, 2004 3:25:20 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

--

Somewhere in Texas, a village is missing its idiot.
"Arny Krueger" <arnyk@hotpop.com> wrote in message
news:EqqdnafI7eAXuRfcRVn-uA@comcast.com...
> "WillStG" <willstg@aol.comnospam> wrote in message
> news:20041104003903.21945.00000073@mb-m06.aol.com
>
> > There are anywhere from 600,000 to a million Americans living in
> > Canada, which leans more to the left than the United States and has
> > traditionally favored the Democrats over the Republicans.
>
> Yeah, the Canadians have leaned left, right into nationalized medical care
> economic hell.
>

As opposed to the US, where I pay $900 a month for health insurance, with
high copayments, and high deductibles.

And our economy? Its in great shape, lemme tell you! Well, until the bill
that Bush is busy running up comes due.

<snip>

> What's to say about Canada except that it's a great place to visit,
> vacation, and perhaps even live for a while, but in a great many people's
> minds (namely all those tens of thousands and hundreds of thousands
> Canadian immigrants who are now US citizens), it lacks the standard of
> living of the US.

Take heart, we too will soon lack our standard of living.
Anonymous
November 4, 2004 5:26:22 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Arny Krueger" <arnyk@hotpop.com> wrote in message news:<EqqdnafI7eAXuRfcRVn-uA@comcast.com>...
> "WillStG" <willstg@aol.comnospam> wrote in message
> news:20041104003903.21945.00000073@mb-m06.aol.com
>
> > There are anywhere from 600,000 to a million Americans living in
> > Canada, which leans more to the left than the United States and has
> > traditionally favored the Democrats over the Republicans.
>
> What's to say about Canada except that it's a great place to visit,
> vacation, and perhaps even live for a while, but in a great many people's
> minds (namely all those tens of thousands and hundreds of thousands
> Canadian immigrants who are now US citizens), it lacks the standard of
> living of the US.
>

I don't know where you got this misconception Canada has consistantly
had a higher standard of Living than the United States, since at least
the 1960s.

The United States has a lower infant mortality rate than Cuba, it
also has a lower literacy rate than Cuba.

The American health care system, ( ah ? ) is on par with Brasil.

But America does blow more people up than any other country.
Anonymous
November 4, 2004 6:17:01 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Bill Van Dyk" <trash@christian-horizons.org> wrote in message
news:418A3F5C.6030406@christian-horizons.org...
>
> We don't spend very much on defense. No wonder we're constantly being
> attacked by... well... those Swiss look scary sometimes...
>
There are a lot of Western countries with lower defense budgets, a benefit
due in good part to having a very powerful neighbor/ally who does spend a
lot in defense. If you have a big brother, you don't need to know how to
fight that well.

Glenn D.
Anonymous
November 4, 2004 6:17:02 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

--

Somewhere in Texas, a village is missing its idiot.
"Glenn Dowdy" <glenn.no.dowdy@hpspam.com> wrote in message
news:NJrid.2311$tA1.969@news.cpqcorp.net...
>
> "Bill Van Dyk" <trash@christian-horizons.org> wrote in message
> news:418A3F5C.6030406@christian-horizons.org...
> >
> > We don't spend very much on defense. No wonder we're constantly being
> > attacked by... well... those Swiss look scary sometimes...
> >
> There are a lot of Western countries with lower defense budgets, a benefit
> due in good part to having a very powerful neighbor/ally who does spend a
> lot in defense. If you have a big brother, you don't need to know how to
> fight that well.
>
> Glenn D.
>
>

Just who the hell do you suppose we're defending Canada against?
Anonymous
November 4, 2004 6:17:02 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Glenn Dowdy" <glenn.no.dowdy@hpspam.com> wrote in message news:<NJrid.2311$tA1.969@news.cpqcorp.net>...
> "Bill Van Dyk" <trash@christian-horizons.org> wrote in message
> news:418A3F5C.6030406@christian-horizons.org...
> >
> > We don't spend very much on defense. No wonder we're constantly being
> > attacked by... well... those Swiss look scary sometimes...
> >
> There are a lot of Western countries with lower defense budgets, a benefit
> due in good part to having a very powerful neighbor/ally who does spend a
> lot in defense. If you have a big brother, you don't need to know how to
> fight that well.
>
> Glenn D.


If you don't get into fights you know all there is to know about
fighting. It's called evolution.

That the US millitary uses 60% of the fuel consumed by America, and
takes up how much of your GNP, is a testament to misplaced resources.
Anonymous
November 4, 2004 7:14:19 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Wow, as usual many Americans prove themselves ignorant of any one or thing
except their own distorted image of themselves. The only people that I have
met that have lived in both countries who would choose the US have been
quite wealthy. And I mean like 1/4of a mil /a. wealthy. Any one making an
average living that thinks they would be worse off in Canada is sorely
mistaken. I know this from experience. Yes there are flaws and inequities
in the Canadian system and our health care is far from perfect. However at
least a person making minimum wage HAS health care. We even have Nazi's
just like your GWB, we just don't elect them Prime Minister. There are many
reasons for the exodus of Canadians to the US in recent years most of them
have to do with bucks. People with big bucks don't want to pay a tax that
benefits the average person. Some doctors that got into medicine for the
wrong reasons think that 250k/a is not enough cash. Some engineers might
find it exciting to work on a project that is funded up the ass by the DOD
making the latest death ray or missle shield. I think that most Americans
need an eduction with a world view. US education operates like the US is
still in it's isolationist period. I've met kids from villages in remote
China that know more about the world than their US counterparts. That is
shameful. YWou should all be ashamed of yourselves, at least those of you
that are part of the problem.
My apologies to any Americans that don't have their heads up their asses (me
included).
ciao,
ken

"Roger Christie" <rochrist@charter.net> wrote in message
news:10okpfhknqjrsf6@corp.supernews.com...
>
>
> --
>
> Somewhere in Texas, a village is missing its idiot.
> "Arny Krueger" <arnyk@hotpop.com> wrote in message
> news:EqqdnafI7eAXuRfcRVn-uA@comcast.com...
>> "WillStG" <willstg@aol.comnospam> wrote in message
>> news:20041104003903.21945.00000073@mb-m06.aol.com
>>
>> > There are anywhere from 600,000 to a million Americans living in
>> > Canada, which leans more to the left than the United States and has
>> > traditionally favored the Democrats over the Republicans.
>>
>> Yeah, the Canadians have leaned left, right into nationalized medical
>> care
>> economic hell.
>>
>
> As opposed to the US, where I pay $900 a month for health insurance, with
> high copayments, and high deductibles.
>
> And our economy? Its in great shape, lemme tell you! Well, until the bill
> that Bush is busy running up comes due.
>
> <snip>
>
>> What's to say about Canada except that it's a great place to visit,
>> vacation, and perhaps even live for a while, but in a great many people's
>> minds (namely all those tens of thousands and hundreds of thousands
>> Canadian immigrants who are now US citizens), it lacks the standard of
>> living of the US.
>
> Take heart, we too will soon lack our standard of living.
>
>
>
Anonymous
November 4, 2004 7:24:00 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Arny Krueger <arnyk@hotpop.com> wrote:

> Yeah, the Canadians have leaned left, right into nationalized medical care
> economic hell.

Tell me about it! What with Americans buying up our medications and flu
vaccines, it is getting harder and harder to get health care here.

Rob R.
Anonymous
November 4, 2004 7:26:38 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Nmm wrote:

>
> Don't wait for the draft, rental prices in Toronto are still low right now.

How low?


Bob
--

"Things should be described as simply as possible, but no
simpler."

A. Einstein
Anonymous
November 4, 2004 7:43:19 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Greg Taylor" <gtaylor@umd.umich.edu> wrote in message
news:p zsid.381$cx6.217@news.itd.umich.edu


> Arny, you live in the Detroit area?

True.

I'll probably be at the next SMWTMS (Detroit area audio club) meeting which
I think is this weekend.

For information on the club, visit the SMWTMS Web Site at:

http://provide.net/~djcarlst/smwtms.htm
November 4, 2004 7:54:14 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Dear Unhappy Democrats:

I am an American who resides legally in Canada. However, I am
planning to retire to the United States ASAP. I'd be delighted to
trade or sell my beautiful home in Prince Edward Island, furnished or
unfurnished, to a fellow American . . .

I'm hoping to find a home in eastern Oregon or in New Mexico.

Cheers . . .
November 4, 2004 8:01:08 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Dear Unhappy Democrats:

I am an American who resides legally in Canada. However, I am
planning to retire to the United States ASAP. I'd be delighted to
trade or sell my beautiful home in Prince Edward Island, furnished or
unfurnished, to a fellow American . . .

I'm hoping to find a home in eastern Oregon or in New Mexico.

Cheers . . .
Anonymous
November 4, 2004 8:30:52 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Roger Christie" <rochrist@charter.net> wrote in message
news:10okphqkdls3754@corp.supernews.com...
>
>
> --
>
> Somewhere in Texas, a village is missing its idiot.
> "Glenn Dowdy" <glenn.no.dowdy@hpspam.com> wrote in message
> news:NJrid.2311$tA1.969@news.cpqcorp.net...
> >
> > "Bill Van Dyk" <trash@christian-horizons.org> wrote in message
> > news:418A3F5C.6030406@christian-horizons.org...
> > >
> > > We don't spend very much on defense. No wonder we're constantly being
> > > attacked by... well... those Swiss look scary sometimes...
> > >
> > There are a lot of Western countries with lower defense budgets, a
benefit
> > due in good part to having a very powerful neighbor/ally who does spend
a
> > lot in defense. If you have a big brother, you don't need to know how to
> > fight that well.
> >
>
> Just who the hell do you suppose we're defending Canada against?
>
Beats me. But if the US had a tiny armed force, would Canada's (and NATO,
etc.) maintain their present level of military forces?

Glenn D.
Anonymous
November 4, 2004 8:30:53 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Glenn Dowdy wrote:


> Beats me. But if the US had a tiny armed force, would Canada's (and NATO,
> etc.) maintain their present level of military forces?

If the US had a tiny armed force most of the rest of the
world wouldn't feel the need for much of one either.


Bob
--

"Things should be described as simply as possible, but no
simpler."

A. Einstein
November 4, 2004 9:13:17 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Uh.... probably. We haven't really pissed anyone off. Well, not true, we're
not just pushovers that don't stand up for ourselves, but we're not bullies
either. The only nation that I'm afraid of attack from is the US. If we
weren't so willing to continue trade with the US, I'm sure we would be found
to "harbor terrorists and WMD's" and then..... we'd have the United States
of North America.


m.
--


mikerekka at hotmail dot com hates spam



>>
> Beats me. But if the US had a tiny armed force, would Canada's (and NATO,
> etc.) maintain their present level of military forces?
>
> Glenn D.
>
>
November 5, 2004 1:35:03 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"it lacks the standard of living of the US."

Being a Canadian who lives 30 minutes from the boarderon the west coast I
can say Canada lacks the standard of living the USA has.......We lack
GUNS......we lack.....AMERICAN GREED......we lack.....AMERICAN
BIGGOTRY.....we lack.....GEORGE BUSH.....we lack
.......WEAPONS OF MASS DESTRUCTION......we lack
.........EVERTHING AMERICAN......WE ARE CANADIAN AND WE DON'T LACK ANYTHING
BUT THE AMERCAN ATTITUDE.





Arny Krueger <arnyk@hotpop.com> wrote in message
news:EqqdnafI7eAXuRfcRVn-uA@comcast.com...
> "WillStG" <willstg@aol.comnospam> wrote in message
> news:20041104003903.21945.00000073@mb-m06.aol.com
>
> > There are anywhere from 600,000 to a million Americans living in
> > Canada, which leans more to the left than the United States and has
> > traditionally favored the Democrats over the Republicans.
>
> Yeah, the Canadians have leaned left, right into nationalized medical care
> economic hell.
>
> > But statistics show a gradual decline in U.S. citizens coming to work
> > and live in Canada, which has an ailing health care system and
> > relatively high levels of personal taxation.
>
> People who live in border cities like Detroit probably have more real
world
> experience with life in Canada than anybody else but actual Canadians.
>
> There are so many Canadians and ex-Canadians in the Detroit area that most
> Detroiters have a little or a lot of a Canaidan accent, eh?
>
> A high percentage of the people who live in border cities like Detroit
> either still are Canadians or were Canadians earlier in their lives.
>
> Many of my co-workers have been folks who come over the border every day
to
> work here. If you stand at the exit to the tunnel or the bridge any wekk
day
> morning, the passenger car traffic has a distinct US-bound direction to
it.
>
> At times some people in the US would drive to Canada to buy gas or luxury
> items. Not so much today. Not for the gas at all.
>
> My wife's great-grandparents immigrated to the US from Canada, and my
> daughter-in-law's grandparents were also Canadian immigrants.
>
> Michigan's current governor was born in Canada. Pundits have noted that
she
> can't be the US's first female president.
>
> A big chunk of post WW2 european immigrants came to Canada first, and then
> immigrated to the US. A lot of recent immigrants from the Pacific rim
> followed a similar path. In their minds, Caanda was a nice place to stay
> until they could finish the job of immigration to the US.
>
> We love Canada and Canadians, but we live in the US!
>
> What's to say about Canada except that it's a great place to visit,
> vacation, and perhaps even live for a while, but in a great many people's
> minds (namely all those tens of thousands and hundreds of thousands
> Canadian immigrants who are now US citizens), it lacks the standard of
> living of the US.
>
> Being a lover of the out-of-doors I vacation in Canada just about every
> chance I get. Great place to visit but...
>
>
Anonymous
November 5, 2004 2:25:55 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

>"Troy" alternate-root@shaw.ca

>Being a Canadian who lives 30 minutes from the boarderon the west coast I
>can say Canada lacks the standard of living the USA has.......We lack
>GUNS......we lack.....AMERICAN GREED......we lack.....AMERICAN
>BIGGOTRY.....we lack.....GEORGE BUSH.....we lack
>......WEAPONS OF MASS DESTRUCTION......we lack
>........EVERTHING AMERICAN......WE ARE CANADIAN AND WE DON'T LACK ANYTHING
>BUT THE AMERCAN ATTITUDE.

Yes, yes, Troy, you are a proud Canuck, you have it all, lacking in
nothing and obviously you have no need of an "American attitude"....

As evidently, you prefer a *French* attitude...
<g>

Will Miho
NY Music & TV Audio Guy
Audioist 4 Fox News
"The large print giveth and the small print taketh away..." Tom Waits
Anonymous
November 5, 2004 2:25:56 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Richard Crowley wrote:

> Thanks. Oh and plonk too.
>

You sure showed him.
Anonymous
November 5, 2004 2:28:12 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"WillStG" <willstg@aol.comnospam> wrote in message
news:20041104003903.21945.00000073@mb-m06.aol.com...

> But statistics show a gradual decline in U.S. citizens coming to work and
live
> in Canada, which has an ailing health care system and relatively high
levels of
> personal taxation.
>

Actually, Canada's health care is really good, it's free, you have a choice
of doctors, and it costs less per capita than does American health care (for
those that have it.) The taxes are quite a bit higher.

jb
Anonymous
November 5, 2004 8:57:32 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Pete Dimsman wrote:
>
>
> Richard Crowley wrote:
>
>> Thanks. Oh and plonk too.
>
>
> You sure showed him.


We all live in fear of the Killfile
ROTFLAMFFAO
G
Anonymous
November 5, 2004 10:06:59 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Arny Krueger" <arnyk@hotpop.com> wrote in message
news:D NadnZN55a--qBfcRVn-sA@comcast.com...
> "Don Nafe" <dnafe@magma.ca> wrote in message
> news:KMqdnZZZ_J0trhfcRVn-gw@rogers.com
>
>>> What's to say about Canada except that it's a great place to visit,
>>> vacation, and perhaps even live for a while, but in a great many
>>> people's minds (namely all those tens of thousands and hundreds of
>>> thousands Canadian immigrants who are now US citizens), it lacks the
>>> standard of living of the US.
>
>> I think it has more to with warm air in the winter than a lower
>> standard of living
>
> There is virtually no difference between the weather in Windsor, Ontario
> and the rest of the Detroit area. In fact, the weather is a tad milder in
> Ontario's "Sun Kitchen" than in most of Michigan. They even grow tobacco
> in Ontario a bit east of Windsor. This does not seem to hinder immigration
> from Ontario into Michigan, not one one little bit.

Actually I think the number of Canadians migrating to Michigan is a drop in
the bucket compared to the number of snowbirds who head south for the
winter....warmth, I need warmth!

Don
Anonymous
November 5, 2004 11:02:16 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Nmm" <voxman@arvotek.net> wrote in message
news:D 1a1b33a.0411041426.ae52947@posting.google.com
> "Arny Krueger" <arnyk@hotpop.com> wrote in message
> news:<EqqdnafI7eAXuRfcRVn-uA@comcast.com>...
>> "WillStG" <willstg@aol.comnospam> wrote in message
>> news:20041104003903.21945.00000073@mb-m06.aol.com

>> What's to say about Canada except that it's a great place to visit,
>> vacation, and perhaps even live for a while, but in a great many
>> people's minds (namely all those tens of thousands and hundreds of
>> thousands Canadian immigrants who are now US citizens), it lacks the
>> standard of living of the US.

> I don't know where you got this misconception Canada has consistantly
> had a higher standard of Living than the United States, since at least
> the 1960s.

I get it from all of the Canadians who move to to the US to get a higher
standard of living.

> The United States has a lower infant mortality rate than Cuba, it
> also has a lower literacy rate than Cuba.

Then why don't you move to Cuba? Fool that I am, I'm staying in the US.

> The American health care system, ( ah ? ) is on par with Brazil.

Tell that to all the Brazilians who move here to find a higher standard of
living.

> But America does blow more people up than any other country.

Please stay in Canada where you are.
Anonymous
November 5, 2004 11:03:46 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

>
>
> Actually, Canada's health care is really good, it's free,

Bullshit..... I pay $1,200 a year directly. It's free to the poor, if
your below the poverty line you don't pay, all others do. Well at least
in Vancouver I do. ;-) Basic health care isn't bad, there can be long
waits for surgery.

We have a right wing provincial government called "liberals" (Rush L is
laughing) they would love to privatize everything they call them
private/public partnerships. (really open to graft, political buddies
could get big $'s) Same situation in Alberta but they are least called
conservatives.

Canada isn't perfect, but lately I prefer it to the U.S.

What the U.S. doesn't get, IMHO, is that the rich get the same diseases
the poor get, look after the poor so you don't get what they get.
Weakest link in the U.S. is health care, a pandemic is scary.

you have a choice
> of doctors, and it costs less per capita than does American health care (for
> those that have it.) The taxes are quite a bit higher.
>
> jb
>
>
Anonymous
November 5, 2004 1:51:21 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <dNSdnZtQv-PV4RbcRVn-rQ@comcast.com>,
"Matt Macchiarolo" <matt@nospamplease.com> wrote:

> Thank God for Molsen!!

You mean Molson, which recently announced a merger with Colorado's Coors
Brewing Company? Should be a good fit if the shareholders approve the
merger, as both companies make generic near-beer.
Anonymous
November 5, 2004 2:25:57 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

> > We don't spend very much on defense. No wonder we're constantly being
> > attacked by... well... those Swiss look scary sometimes...
>
> Yeah, they have a bunch of blades on their Army knives.

Actually I hear they are a pretty well armed and militarily trained country.
I heard each of their citizens must do a few years in the military. It's
their foreign policy that keeps them out of trouble.
Anonymous
November 5, 2004 2:28:44 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

> I don't know where you got this misconception Canada has consistantly
> had a higher standard of Living than the United States, since at least
> the 1960s.
>
> The United States has a lower infant mortality rate than Cuba, it
> also has a lower literacy rate than Cuba.
>
> The American health care system, ( ah ? ) is on par with Brasil.
>
> But America does blow more people up than any other country.

I'm confused... you claim the Canada doesn't have a higher standard of
living because the US is better (or equal to) Cuba and Brasil in some
aspects. Can you explain your logic?
Anonymous
November 5, 2004 2:33:51 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Hilarious!

"play-on" <playonATcomcast.net> wrote in message
news:7e7mo0la256k5euoi52b7dlct0b6cpe1t2@4ax.com...
> Speaking of Canada, this is kind of amusing:
>
> https://home.comcast.net/~playon/2005Map.jpg
>
> Al
>
Anonymous
November 5, 2004 2:39:41 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

voxman@arvotek.net (Nmm) wrote in message news:<d1a1b33a.0411040732.3ef2443c@posting.google.com>...

> If you are in the Guard or the service it's even easier to Immigrate to Canada



What if you say you were in the Guard, but can't substantiate that you
fulfilled your terms of service?
Anonymous
November 5, 2004 2:52:17 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

willstg@aol.comnospam (WillStG) wrote in message news:<20041104003903.21945.00000073@mb-m06.aol.com>...
> Unhappy Democrats Must Wait to Get Into Canada
>
> Wed Nov 3, 2004 02:41 PM ET
>
> By David Ljunggren
>
> OTTAWA (Reuters) - Disgruntled Democrats seeking a safe Canadian haven after
> President Bush won Tuesday's election should not pack their bags just yet.
>
<SNIP>

Gee Will, not gloating or anything are we?

Be advised that in VA, were I live (as well as Dorsey and Rivers)...we
consider NYC to be a foreign country, hell you can't even find a
restaurant up there that serves decent grits :) 

Analogeezer
Anonymous
November 5, 2004 2:56:27 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Glenn Dowdy" <glenn.no.dowdy@hpspam.com> wrote in message news:<NJrid.2311$tA1.969@news.cpqcorp.net>...
> "Bill Van Dyk" <trash@christian-horizons.org> wrote in message
> news:418A3F5C.6030406@christian-horizons.org...
> >
> > We don't spend very much on defense. No wonder we're constantly being
> > attacked by... well... those Swiss look scary sometimes...
> >
> There are a lot of Western countries with lower defense budgets, a benefit
> due in good part to having a very powerful neighbor/ally who does spend a
> lot in defense. If you have a big brother, you don't need to know how to
> fight that well.
>
> Glenn D.

Maybe you ought to check your history books a bit....helluva lot of
Canadians bought it on the beaches of Normandy, my father in law was
there (he survived) and he's from Canada.

Later on he moved to the US (he was actually born in the US, went back
to Canada as a child), joined the Marines and fought in Korea.

Canadians aren't pussies by any means....ever see a hockey game?

Analogeezer
Anonymous
November 5, 2004 3:27:52 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Marty Feldman wrote:


> universal health care (and still less than what the US spends per
> capita)


Is that right? Do you have numbers?


I remember when Clinton had a mandate to get us universal health care.
The insurance companies went into total attack mode: "more taxes and a
whole new beauracracy", they said. I looked at my paycheck and saw more
insurance than state income tax (CA) being deducted and laughed; it sure
quacked like a tax.

Since spreading the risk over a large population is what insurance is
about, it seems a no-brainer to me: spread it out over the whole population!
November 5, 2004 3:44:57 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <y%zid.117176$nl.26791@pd7tw3no>,
Troy <alternate-root@shaw.ca> wrote:
>"it lacks the standard of living of the US."
>
>Being a Canadian who lives 30 minutes from the boarderon the west coast I
>can say Canada lacks the standard of living the USA has.......We lack
>GUNS......we lack.....AMERICAN GREED......we lack.....AMERICAN
>BIGGOTRY

I dunno about that last one. I've met some canucks who were
biggoted over indians(native canadians?).
--
vince
/***** Visit the Home of the Rancid Tofu Experience *****/
/***** http://www.garageband.com/artist/rancidtofu *****/
Anonymous
November 5, 2004 4:24:10 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"reddred" <opaloka@REMOVECAPSyahoo.com> wrote in message news:<i_adnXFOLvuxnRbcRVn-1A@adelphia.com>...
> "WillStG" <willstg@aol.comnospam> wrote in message
> news:20041104003903.21945.00000073@mb-m06.aol.com...
>
> > But statistics show a gradual decline in U.S. citizens coming to work and
> live
> > in Canada, which has an ailing health care system and relatively high
> levels of
> > personal taxation.
> >
>
> Actually, Canada's health care is really good, it's free, you have a choice
> of doctors, and it costs less per capita than does American health care (for
> those that have it.) The taxes are quite a bit higher.
>
> jb


American health care on the other hand is Not Good.

Doctors who will only work on people with insurance. Insurance
companies who withold vital life saving procedures due to clerical/
financial concerns. Doctors who preform needless surgery, because it
makes them money.

Look at Rodney Dangerfield, You don't do an elective bypass
operation on someone who is 76. They can't survive such an operation.

Look at Andy Warhol, killed by hospital incompetance.

Pray you don't get sick in America.

And what diseases have the Pharmeseutical Giants cured in the last 30
years? Nothing since Polio, and Polio they only have prevented.

Major mismanagement.
Anonymous
November 5, 2004 4:30:26 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Mark Steven Brooks <elaterium@aol.com> wrote:
>Thinking of it-looking into either Toronto or Vancouver but also researching
>material on being an expat in Amsterdam. That would be my first choice.

There is a _lot_ of competition in Amsterdam. Seems like everyone and his
brother is running a studio. You might look into Prague. The weather is
better, there's a good music scene, and the demand for engineering is
probably better.

There might be a good market for film post work in Amsterdam, though.
--scott
--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
Anonymous
November 5, 2004 5:18:47 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Don Nafe" <dnafe@magma.ca> wrote in message
news:H5udnSX63ct_8RbcRVn-2A@rogers.com
> "Arny Krueger" <arnyk@hotpop.com> wrote in message
> news:D NadnZN55a--qBfcRVn-sA@comcast.com...
>> "Don Nafe" <dnafe@magma.ca> wrote in message
>> news:KMqdnZZZ_J0trhfcRVn-gw@rogers.com
>>
>>>> What's to say about Canada except that it's a great place to visit,
>>>> vacation, and perhaps even live for a while, but in a great many
>>>> people's minds (namely all those tens of thousands and hundreds of
>>>> thousands Canadian immigrants who are now US citizens), it lacks
>>>> the standard of living of the US.
>>
>>> I think it has more to with warm air in the winter than a lower
>>> standard of living
>>
>> There is virtually no difference between the weather in Windsor,
>> Ontario and the rest of the Detroit area. In fact, the weather is a
>> tad milder in Ontario's "Sun Kitchen" than in most of Michigan. They
>> even grow tobacco in Ontario a bit east of Windsor. This does not
>> seem to hinder immigration from Ontario into Michigan, not one one
>> little bit.
>
> Actually I think the number of Canadians migrating to Michigan is a
> drop in the bucket compared to the number of snowbirds who head south
> for the winter....warmth, I need warmth!

Agreed that MI has a considerable population who head down I-75 when the
weather starts dropping below 50 degees.
Anonymous
November 5, 2004 6:17:14 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Bob Cain <arcane@arcanemethods.com> wrote:


> Nmm wrote:

>>
>> Don't wait for the draft, rental prices in Toronto are still low right now.

> How low?

They are a bit lower because a whole bunch of renters bought condos in the
last 3 years, increasing the vacancy rate to what is currently about 4%
which is huge for Toronto. For most of the last 10 years the vacancy
rate sat around 1% or so.

So I don't know what you call low. I think at the low end you will find
a basement bachelor (no separate bedroom) in the range of $600 which is
about $480 USD, in the downtown area. If you want something nicer
like a decent one-bedroom you can expect to pay about $800 ($640 USD) and
up.

Most of the decline in rent costs has taken place in the high-end
dwellings since the people who vacated them were more likely to buy a
home than people living in cheap apartments. This all happened because
of the super low mortgage rates. It did cause the housing/condo
market to go super-hot and as a result property values shot up in Toronto.

So, compared to NYC, these are dirt cheap. But I expect there are large
cities in the US where you can live for less than that.

Rob R.
Anonymous
November 5, 2004 6:17:55 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Raymond Collins" <rcol@intergate.bc.ca> wrote in message
news:418ba39e$1_1@dowco.com...
>
>
>
> >
> >
> > Actually, Canada's health care is really good, it's free,
>
> Bullshit..... I pay $1,200 a year directly.

Cheap.

jb
Anonymous
November 5, 2004 6:48:23 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Arny Krueger <arnyk@hotpop.com> wrote:

>> I don't know where you got this misconception Canada has consistantly
>> had a higher standard of Living than the United States, since at least
>> the 1960s.

> I get it from all of the Canadians who move to to the US to get a higher
> standard of living.

Some of them do that. I have several friends who have done that. They
tend to be high-income earners who want to move to a system that is
advantageous to them since the US taxes high-income people at a much
lower-rate. Plus part of your mortgages are tax-deductable.

But then, seeing as you are basing your understanding on the ones who move
there to improve there lives, you are probably ignoring everyone else---
all the Canadians who wouldn't want to move there because they would lose
out. And then you also aren't taking into account everyone who moves to
Canada to improve there lives.

But, while we are on this subject, I think a few posters are painting
picture of Canada that is a bit too rosy. Yes, we have mostly eliminated
deficits, but we still have huge debts to deal with. While our health-
care system appears to be finally turning to corner, we have suffered
a lot of damage to it over the years due to goverment cut-backs (we
had to knock that deficit down somehow, right?) Education is becoming
extremely expensive---it now costs $4000 a year or so to go to university.
Cheap by American standards---but when I went to University in the
eighties, it cost about $600 a year. (These are all in Canadian dollars).

Ugly consumerism is rampant in Canada. People continue to buy gas-
guzzling SUVs in droves. I have neighbours who run their air-conditioners
during cooler evenings because electircity is so cheap they are too lazy
to open their windows. And huge ugly homes are being built all over the
place---a lot of trees are getting cut down so that people have a tripple
garage for their three really huge cars.

Add to this all of the guns that are starting to work their way into
Canada. Murders by hand-gun are on the increase. It is well known
that one form of free-trade is the pot grown in Canada is being
exchanged for guns made in the US. You may like your guns in the US,
but we sure don't like them here.

So, compared to most of the world, we have pretty good lives in Canada.
but there is some pretty stupid stuff going on.

I will say one thing---I am proud of recyling in Toronto. We have just
started a city-wide compost collection system. And it is working very
well. What is really good about it is that there is all sorts of stuff
that can't go in a backyard composter that the city can collect like
meat waste, used kleenex and other hygiene products and so on.

Of course the reason we did this is we had no choice. We ran out of land-
fill sites And I don't know how much longer that land-fill site in
Michigan will keep accepting Toronto garbage.

Rob R.
Anonymous
November 5, 2004 7:02:50 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Analogeezer wrote:

> Gee Will, not gloating or anything are we?


Never.


> Be advised that in VA, were I live (as well as Dorsey and Rivers)...we
> consider NYC to be a foreign country, hell you can't even find a
> restaurant up there that serves decent grits :) 


I live here too, although I'll always be a NY'er.
Anonymous
November 5, 2004 8:07:22 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

--

Somewhere in Texas, a village is missing its idiot.
"Raymond Collins" <rcol@intergate.bc.ca> wrote in message
news:418ba39e$1_1@dowco.com...
>
>
>
> >
> >
> > Actually, Canada's health care is really good, it's free,
>
> Bullshit..... I pay $1,200 a year directly. It's free to the poor, if
> your below the poverty line you don't pay, all others do. Well at least
> in Vancouver I do. ;-) Basic health care isn't bad, there can be long
> waits for surgery.
>

Well, I pay close to that a MONTH here.
Anonymous
November 5, 2004 8:50:03 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

> Of course the reason we did this is we had no choice. We ran out of land-
> fill sites And I don't know how much longer that land-fill site in
> Michigan will keep accepting Toronto garbage.

I live seven miles from one of those places...glad to hear you're working on
reductions.

But I have to wonder...how the heck does Ontario run out of landfill space?
Isn't there a trillion or so square miles of uninhabited land in Canada?
There are, what, 467 people living in Manitoba, and it's a big as North
Dakota, South Dakota, and Nebraska combined. You'd think there are a few
spots where nobody would notice a landfill or two. :-)

-John O
-of Canadian ancestry
Anonymous
November 5, 2004 9:11:45 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

John O <johno@#no^spam&heathkit.com> wrote:
>> Of course the reason we did this is we had no choice. We ran out of land-
>> fill sites And I don't know how much longer that land-fill site in
>> Michigan will keep accepting Toronto garbage.

> I live seven miles from one of those places...glad to hear you're working on
> reductions.

> But I have to wonder...how the heck does Ontario run out of landfill space?
> Isn't there a trillion or so square miles of uninhabited land in Canada?
> There are, what, 467 people living in Manitoba, and it's a big as North
> Dakota, South Dakota, and Nebraska combined. You'd think there are a few
> spots where nobody would notice a landfill or two. :-)

I am not sure! But, Toronto is in a highly populated area. You can travel
from Toronto to Buffalo and it is almost uninterrupted urban and suburban
populations. And there doesn't seem to be anywhere near that will
take our landfill. It only takes 3 or 4 hours for the trucks to get
to Michigan, but Manitoba is a 24 hour drive from here. Not that they
would take the trash, anyway.

I guess the Michigan land fill site is happy to take our money. But it's
the areas along the way that aren't happy with the 150 or so semi-sized
trucks hauling Toronto garbage past them every day. Who could blame them?

Rob R.
!