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The solution to our nuke waste problem

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Anonymous
November 5, 2004 5:59:37 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

It seems the US government has been loading bombs with depleted uranium
and dropping them on Iraq ,According to a History Channel show
"sworn to secrecy" so far 630 THOUSAND TONS of nuke waste has been
dumped in Iraq
Makes one proud to be a American
George

More about : solution nuke waste problem

Anonymous
November 5, 2004 5:59:38 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

George Gleason <g.p.gleason@att.net> wrote:
>
>It seems the US government has been loading bombs with depleted uranium
>and dropping them on Iraq ,According to a History Channel show
>"sworn to secrecy" so far 630 THOUSAND TONS of nuke waste has been
>dumped in Iraq
>Makes one proud to be a American

It's good stuff, actually. It's extremely dense, and while it's a little
more toxic than lead (mostly because of slightly better solubility), it is
no more radioactive than a brick and a bit less radioactive than a cigarette.

Back on the audio thread, depleted uranium fragments are great for speaker
stands and mounts. You get a good bit more weight per unit volume than you
do with lead shot. I've used the stuff on Altec A-5s as a quick and dirty
way of dealing with cabinet resonances.
--scott
--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
Anonymous
November 5, 2004 6:22:59 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

<<It's good stuff, actually. >>

Then you won't mind if we ship some over to your house for your kids to play
with?
elaterium@aol.com (Mark Steven Brooks/Elaterium Music)
Anonymous
November 5, 2004 6:23:00 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Mark Steven Brooks <elaterium@aol.com> wrote:
><<It's good stuff, actually. >>
>
>Then you won't mind if we ship some over to your house for your kids to play
>with?

Just like lead, it's a heavy metal and it's bad for kids to play with
unsupervised. You should wash your hands after handling it, just like
working with solder.

I have a couple bags in the garage but if you want to send over some more,
I am sure it will come in handy for my new turntable plinth. I have sold
my old Fairchild table on Ebay and need to figure out a solid mount for
a 16" Sony broadcast platter.
--scott
--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
Anonymous
November 5, 2004 6:23:01 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

kludge@panix.com (Scott Dorsey) wrote in message news:<cmg68k$pr$1@panix2.panix.com>...
> Mark Steven Brooks <elaterium@aol.com> wrote:
> ><<It's good stuff, actually. >>
> >
> >Then you won't mind if we ship some over to your house for your kids to play
> >with?
>
> Just like lead, it's a heavy metal and it's bad for kids to play with
> unsupervised. You should wash your hands after handling it, just like
> working with solder.
>
> I have a couple bags in the garage but if you want to send over some more,
> I am sure it will come in handy for my new turntable plinth. I have sold
> my old Fairchild table on Ebay and need to figure out a solid mount for
> a 16" Sony broadcast platter.
> --scott


How about if we vapourize it near your kid's school?

It takes on quite a differant charchter when vapourized; like when it
used with explosiceves and explodes. The international courts have it
banned as a "weapon of Mass Destruction" . That's part of the reason
Bush won't let the US be a signatory to the international convention
on war crimes. He almost slipped up in one of the debates saying that
"We don't want a Court bringing our soldiers to ----Justice". He
replaced the word "justice" with some sort of nonsensicle phrase.

And the Depleted Uranium talk has happened in RAP a few times, and
someone will point that that league of republican scientists that
don't believe in Global warming, evolution or other such northern
liberal wine wipping concepts.

They are the same ones that said lead preservatives in vaccines are
"Good For You". Lead causes brain damage, depleted uranium causes
cancer.

And to anyone who says differant I will pay you $5. Euros for every
10g you eat of powderd depleted Uranium. Go Ahead, feed it to your
kids.
Anonymous
November 5, 2004 7:39:25 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On 5 Nov 2004 10:16:44 -0500, kludge@panix.com (Scott Dorsey) wrote:

>George Gleason <g.p.gleason@att.net> wrote:
>>
>>It seems the US government has been loading bombs with depleted uranium
>>and dropping them on Iraq ,According to a History Channel show
>>"sworn to secrecy" so far 630 THOUSAND TONS of nuke waste has been
>>dumped in Iraq
>>Makes one proud to be a American
>
>It's good stuff, actually. It's extremely dense, and while it's a little
>more toxic than lead (mostly because of slightly better solubility), it is
>no more radioactive than a brick and a bit less radioactive than a cigarette.

It's OK until you fire it down a gun barrel at high velocity and then
bang it into armor plating. Some of it tends to get finely pulverized
and oxidized. If you inhale the dust, that's bad. Worse than lead, in
that respect, because it's more toxic.

So you don't want to be on a battlefield where it's being used. Come
to think of it, you probably don't want to be on a battlefield,
period. As a turntable weight, it's probably as safe as lead.

Mike T.
Anonymous
November 5, 2004 8:04:39 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Scott Dorsey <kludge@panix.com> wrote:
> Mark Steven Brooks <elaterium@aol.com> wrote:
>><<It's good stuff, actually. >>
>>
>>Then you won't mind if we ship some over to your house for your kids to play
>>with?

> Just like lead, it's a heavy metal and it's bad for kids to play with
> unsupervised. You should wash your hands after handling it, just like
> working with solder.

> I have a couple bags in the garage but if you want to send over some more,
> I am sure it will come in handy for my new turntable plinth. I have sold
> my old Fairchild table on Ebay and need to figure out a solid mount for
> a 16" Sony broadcast platter.

See?...Do not argue with a rocket scientist. Scott really is a rocket
scientist, and people would be wise not to try to argue on knowledge
with him.

Stick with the "Dorsey is a pig" tactic, because you can't argue with
pure stupidity.

Rob R.
Anonymous
November 6, 2004 12:12:01 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

George Gleason wrote:

> It seems the US government has been loading bombs with depleted uranium
> and dropping them on Iraq ,According to a History Channel show
> "sworn to secrecy" so far 630 THOUSAND TONS of nuke waste has been
> dumped in Iraq
> Makes one proud to be a American

Sorry George but depleted uranium isn't 'nuclear waste' other than maybe
that it's no good ( waste ? ) for use in nuclear reactors since it isn't
fissile.

It's used for armour piercing shells on account of its high mass.


Graham
Anonymous
November 6, 2004 12:15:13 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Scott Dorsey" <kludge@panix.com> wrote in message
news:cmg68k$pr$1@panix2.panix.com...
> Mark Steven Brooks <elaterium@aol.com> wrote:
> ><<It's good stuff, actually. >>
> >
> >Then you won't mind if we ship some over to your house for your kids to
play
> >with?
>
> Just like lead, it's a heavy metal and it's bad for kids to play with
> unsupervised. You should wash your hands after handling it, just like
> working with solder.
>
> I have a couple bags in the garage but if you want to send over some more,
> I am sure it will come in handy for my new turntable plinth. I have sold
> my old Fairchild table on Ebay and need to figure out a solid mount for
> a 16" Sony broadcast platter.

Ummm, Scott... where do you get depleted uranium? Surely not at the corner
hardware store, right?

-jw
Anonymous
November 6, 2004 12:19:32 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Pooh Bear wrote:
>
> George Gleason wrote:
>
>
>>It seems the US government has been loading bombs with depleted uranium
>>and dropping them on Iraq ,According to a History Channel show
>>"sworn to secrecy" so far 630 THOUSAND TONS of nuke waste has been
>>dumped in Iraq
>>Makes one proud to be a American
>
>
> Sorry George but depleted uranium isn't 'nuclear waste' other than maybe
> that it's no good ( waste ? ) for use in nuclear reactors since it isn't
> fissile.
>
> It's used for armour piercing shells on account of its high mass.
>
>
> Graham
>
>
>
I know very little about the material
only relating what was presented by the history channel program
They "implied" it was spent fuel from reactors
George
Anonymous
November 6, 2004 12:19:33 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <E7Sid.846668$Gx4.660968@bgtnsc04-news.ops.worldnet.att.net>,
George Gleason <g.p.gleason@worldnet.att.net> wrote:

> Pooh Bear wrote:
> >
> > George Gleason wrote:
> >
> >
> >>It seems the US government has been loading bombs with depleted uranium
> >>and dropping them on Iraq ,According to a History Channel show
> >>"sworn to secrecy" so far 630 THOUSAND TONS of nuke waste has been
> >>dumped in Iraq
> >>Makes one proud to be a American
> >
> >
> > Sorry George but depleted uranium isn't 'nuclear waste' other than maybe
> > that it's no good ( waste ? ) for use in nuclear reactors since it isn't
> > fissile.
> >
> > It's used for armour piercing shells on account of its high mass.
> >
> >
> > Graham
> >
> >
> >
> I know very little about the material
> only relating what was presented by the history channel program
> They "implied" it was spent fuel from reactors
> George


More likely produced in the refining process to create nuclear fuel. It is
depleted of the fissile isotope.

-Jay
--
x------- Jay Kadis ------- x---- Jay's Attic Studio ------x
x Lecturer, Audio Engineer x Dexter Records x
x CCRMA, Stanford University x http://www.offbeats.com/ x
x---------- http://ccrma.stanford.edu/~jay/ ------------x
Anonymous
November 6, 2004 12:19:33 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"George Gleason" <g.p.gleason@worldnet.att.net> wrote in message
news:E7Sid.846668$Gx4.660968@bgtnsc04-news.ops.worldnet.att.net

> I know very little about the material

Seems like a good reason to not write a lot about it.

> only relating what was presented by the history channel program
> They "implied" it was spent fuel from reactors

http://www.thewe.cc/contents/more/archive/june2003/depl...

"Depleted uranium (DU) is a by-product caused by extracting fissionable
isotopes (uranium 234 and 235) from natural uranium (238) for use in nuclear
weapons and reactors. "

http://www.gulflink.osd.mil/faq_17apr.htm

"Depleted uranium is what is left over when most of the highly radioactive
types (isotopes) of uranium are removed for use as nuclear fuel or nuclear
weapons. The depleted uranium used in armor-piercing munitions and in
enhanced armor protection for some Abrams tanks is also used in civilian
industry, primarily for stabilizers in airplanes and boats."
Anonymous
November 6, 2004 1:27:17 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

George Gleason wrote:

> Pooh Bear wrote:
> >
> > George Gleason wrote:
> >
> >
> >>It seems the US government has been loading bombs with depleted uranium
> >>and dropping them on Iraq ,According to a History Channel show
> >>"sworn to secrecy" so far 630 THOUSAND TONS of nuke waste has been
> >>dumped in Iraq
> >>Makes one proud to be a American
> >
> >
> > Sorry George but depleted uranium isn't 'nuclear waste' other than maybe
> > that it's no good ( waste ? ) for use in nuclear reactors since it isn't
> > fissile.
> >
> > It's used for armour piercing shells on account of its high mass.
> >
> >
> > Graham
>
>
> I know very little about the material
> only relating what was presented by the history channel program
> They "implied" it was spent fuel from reactors

They were talking out of their arseholes and should have known better ( clearly
no research done ).

Depleted Uranium is actually a 'refined' product rather than waste !

Having said that, when a depleted uranium tipped shell is fired at something -
you get fine particles of uranium / uranium oxide formed that's pretty
unhealthy to breathe in. Has been speculatively implicated in 'Gulf War
syndrome'.


Graham
Anonymous
November 6, 2004 1:55:22 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Nmm" <voxman@arvotek.net> wrote in message
news:D 1a1b33a.0411051438.62842929@posting.google.com...
> kludge@panix.com (Scott Dorsey) wrote in message
news:<cmg68k$pr$1@panix2.panix.com>...
> > Mark Steven Brooks <elaterium@aol.com> wrote:
> > ><<It's good stuff, actually. >>
> > >
> > >Then you won't mind if we ship some over to your house for your kids to
play
> > >with?
> >
> > Just like lead, it's a heavy metal and it's bad for kids to play with
> > unsupervised. You should wash your hands after handling it, just like
> > working with solder.
> >
> > I have a couple bags in the garage but if you want to send over some
more,
> > I am sure it will come in handy for my new turntable plinth. I have
sold
> > my old Fairchild table on Ebay and need to figure out a solid mount for
> > a 16" Sony broadcast platter.
> > --scott
>
>
> How about if we vapourize it near your kid's school?

How will you do that?
>
> It takes on quite a differant charchter when vapourized; like when it
> used with explosiceves and explodes. The international courts have it
> banned as a "weapon of Mass Destruction" .

Cite? And how can it be a WMD? What's your delivery method for affecting
hundreds and thousands of people? A flat file?


> They are the same ones that said lead preservatives in vaccines are
> "Good For You".

Cite?

> Lead causes brain damage, depleted uranium causes
> cancer.

So don't eat it.
>
> And to anyone who says differant I will pay you $5. Euros for every
> 10g you eat of powderd depleted Uranium. Go Ahead, feed it to your
> kids.

Is sulfur a WMD? I sure wouldn't eat 10g of it, either. I wouldn't eat 10g
of dog feces for five Euros, but it's hardly a danger. Would you eat that
much lead?

Glenn D.
Anonymous
November 6, 2004 2:02:34 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Nmm wrote:

> kludge@panix.com (Scott Dorsey) wrote in message news:<cmg68k$pr$1@panix2.panix.com>...
> > Mark Steven Brooks <elaterium@aol.com> wrote:
> > ><<It's good stuff, actually. >>
> > >
> > >Then you won't mind if we ship some over to your house for your kids to play
> > >with?
> >
> > Just like lead, it's a heavy metal and it's bad for kids to play with
> > unsupervised. You should wash your hands after handling it, just like
> > working with solder.
> >
> > I have a couple bags in the garage but if you want to send over some more,
> > I am sure it will come in handy for my new turntable plinth. I have sold
> > my old Fairchild table on Ebay and need to figure out a solid mount for
> > a 16" Sony broadcast platter.
> > --scott
>
> How about if we vapourize it near your kid's school?
>
> It takes on quite a differant charchter when vapourized; like when it
> used with explosiceves and explodes. The international courts have it
> banned as a "weapon of Mass Destruction" . That's part of the reason
> Bush won't let the US be a signatory to the international convention
> on war crimes.

The UK uses DU shells but has no problem on that account.

I have some problem believing " The international courts have it banned as a "weapon of
Mass Destruction".

What's your source ? Reliable ?


> He almost slipped up in one of the debates saying that
> "We don't want a Court bringing our soldiers to ----Justice". He
> replaced the word "justice" with some sort of nonsensicle phrase.
>
> And the Depleted Uranium talk has happened in RAP a few times, and
> someone will point that that league of republican scientists that
> don't believe in Global warming, evolution or other such northern
> liberal wine wipping concepts.
>
> They are the same ones that said lead preservatives in vaccines are
> "Good For You". Lead causes brain damage, depleted uranium causes
> cancer.
>
> And to anyone who says differant I will pay you $5. Euros for every
> 10g you eat of powderd depleted Uranium. Go Ahead, feed it to your
> kids.

I'll remind you of the dangers of beryllium. Hasn't stopped it being used in power
semiconductors or esoteric tweeters.


Graham
Anonymous
November 6, 2004 4:21:43 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Scott Dorsey wrote:

> George Gleason <g.p.gleason@att.net> wrote:
>
>>It seems the US government has been loading bombs with depleted uranium
>>and dropping them on Iraq ,According to a History Channel show
>>"sworn to secrecy" so far 630 THOUSAND TONS of nuke waste has been
>>dumped in Iraq
>>Makes one proud to be a American
>
>
> It's good stuff, actually. It's extremely dense, and while it's a little
> more toxic than lead (mostly because of slightly better solubility), it is
> no more radioactive than a brick and a bit less radioactive than a cigarette.

Is its melting point low like lead?


Thanks,

Bob
--

"Things should be described as simply as possible, but no
simpler."

A. Einstein
Anonymous
November 6, 2004 6:03:12 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

John Washburn wrote:

> where do you get depleted uranium?

From Viagra recyclers.

--
ha
Anonymous
November 6, 2004 7:43:52 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Arny Krueger wrote:
> "George Gleason" <g.p.gleason@worldnet.att.net> wrote in message
> news:E7Sid.846668$Gx4.660968@bgtnsc04-news.ops.worldnet.att.net
>
>
>>I know very little about the material
>
>
> Seems like a good reason to not write a lot about it.

>
That is why I wrote very little and claimed no expertize or desire to
become the authoritive voice on depleted Uraninium
G
Anonymous
November 6, 2004 1:21:01 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Glenn Dowdy" <glenn.no.dowdy@hpspam.com> wrote in message news:<uxTid.2475$1i3.1941@news.cpqcorp.net>...
> "Nmm" <voxman@arvotek.net> wrote in message
> news:D 1a1b33a.0411051438.62842929@posting.google.com...
> > kludge@panix.com (Scott Dorsey) wrote in message
> news:<cmg68k$pr$1@panix2.panix.com>...
> > > Mark Steven Brooks <elaterium@aol.com> wrote:
> > > ><<It's good stuff, actually. >>
> > > >
> > > >Then you won't mind if we ship some over to your house for your kids to
> play
> > > >with?
> > >
> > > Just like lead, it's a heavy metal and it's bad for kids to play with
> > > unsupervised. You should wash your hands after handling it, just like
> > > working with solder.
> > >
> > > I have a couple bags in the garage but if you want to send over some
> more,
> > > I am sure it will come in handy for my new turntable plinth. I have
> sold
> > > my old Fairchild table on Ebay and need to figure out a solid mount for
> > > a 16" Sony broadcast platter.
> > > --scott
> >
> >
> > How about if we vapourize it near your kid's school?
>
> How will you do that?

Does it matter how? You realy don't want your kids breathing it do
you.


> >
> > It takes on quite a differant charchter when vapourized; like when it
> > used with explosiceves and explodes. The international courts have it
> > banned as a "weapon of Mass Destruction" .
>
> Cite? And how can it be a WMD?

I think it's use was reffered to as "genocidal" , another part of
America avoiding the World Courts, and International War crimes
tribunals ( Rome Accord ).

> What's your delivery method for affecting
> hundreds and thousands of people? A flat file?
>

I;m not trying to do this. If you need a sceme to do this, there is
something wrong here.

>
> > They are the same ones that said lead preservatives in vaccines are
> > "Good For You".
>
> Cite?
>

It was peice that CBS news sent out to all it's local affiliates. It
stated that "Lead Preservatives used in vaccines are actually <<good
for you>>". It was picked up by www.prisonplanet.com Alex Jone's
website. He is just reporting what CBS said, if you don't trust Alex
Jones. Obviously Lead is not "Good For You".


> > Lead causes brain damage, depleted uranium causes
> > cancer.
>
> So don't eat it.
> >

yes I wouldn't recomend that. I would also say you shouldn't breath
in the dust, though if you are within 1000 miles of Kabul, Baghdad,
Bosnia, and other places where people are dropping shells made of DU


> > And to anyone who says differant I will pay you $5. Euros for every
> > 10g you eat of powderd depleted Uranium. Go Ahead, feed it to your
> > kids.
>
> Is sulfur a WMD?

no sulfer actually kills bacteria and is used in medicines, or was
until penicillian was discovered.
Chlorine is considered a WMD apparently and that's why millions died
of disentry in Iraq because they couldn't purify their water.

> I sure wouldn't eat 10g of it, either. I wouldn't eat 10g
> of dog feces for five Euros, but it's hardly a danger. Would you eat that
> much lead?
>

The Dog feces is more of a Fear Factor stunt, not something that you
would want to eat, but rather harmless, unless the dog has worms. I'd
say eating 10g of powdered Depleted Uranium would be enough to make
some one really sick with serious long term health effects. The "what
would you eat for $5 Euros"is beside the point. Would you eat 10g or
powdered DU?



http://www.thepowerhour.com/articles/du_effects.htm


http://english.aljazeera.net/NR/exeres/B93DF501-832A-42...
Anonymous
November 6, 2004 3:15:26 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Bob Cain <arcane@arcanemethods.com> wrote:
>Scott Dorsey wrote:
>
>> George Gleason <g.p.gleason@att.net> wrote:
>>
>>>It seems the US government has been loading bombs with depleted uranium
>>>and dropping them on Iraq ,According to a History Channel show
>>>"sworn to secrecy" so far 630 THOUSAND TONS of nuke waste has been
>>>dumped in Iraq
>>>Makes one proud to be a American
>>
>> It's good stuff, actually. It's extremely dense, and while it's a little
>> more toxic than lead (mostly because of slightly better solubility), it is
>> no more radioactive than a brick and a bit less radioactive than a cigarette.
>
>Is its melting point low like lead?

It's not quite as low as lead and it's not quite as soft, but it's close.
It's very ductile, not brittle.

And yes, it will kill you. That's the whole point of bullets.
--scott

--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
Anonymous
November 6, 2004 3:19:26 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Nmm" <voxman@arvotek.net> wrote in message
news:D 1a1b33a.0411061021.4f3aca47@posting.google.com...
> "Glenn Dowdy" <glenn.no.dowdy@hpspam.com> wrote in message
news:<uxTid.2475$1i3.1941@news.cpqcorp.net>...
> > "Nmm" <voxman@arvotek.net> wrote in message
> > news:D 1a1b33a.0411051438.62842929@posting.google.com...
> > > kludge@panix.com (Scott Dorsey) wrote in message
> > news:<cmg68k$pr$1@panix2.panix.com>...
> > > > Mark Steven Brooks <elaterium@aol.com> wrote:
> > > > ><<It's good stuff, actually. >>
> > > > >
> > > > >Then you won't mind if we ship some over to your house for your
kids to
> > play
> > > > >with?
> > > >
> > > > Just like lead, it's a heavy metal and it's bad for kids to play
with
> > > > unsupervised. You should wash your hands after handling it, just
like
> > > > working with solder.
> > > >
> > > > I have a couple bags in the garage but if you want to send over some
> > more,
> > > > I am sure it will come in handy for my new turntable plinth. I have
> > sold
> > > > my old Fairchild table on Ebay and need to figure out a solid mount
for
> > > > a 16" Sony broadcast platter.
> > > > --scott
> > >
> > >
> > > How about if we vapourize it near your kid's school?
> >
> > How will you do that?
>
> Does it matter how? You realy don't want your kids breathing it do
> you.
>
I don't want them breathing lead dust, or playing in the streets or getting
shot, all of which are much more likely to happen than breathing vaporized
depleted uranium.
>
> > >
> > > It takes on quite a differant charchter when vapourized; like when it
> > > used with explosiceves and explodes. The international courts have it
> > > banned as a "weapon of Mass Destruction" .
> >
> > Cite? And how can it be a WMD?
>
> I think it's use was reffered to as "genocidal" , another part of
> America avoiding the World Courts, and International War crimes
> tribunals ( Rome Accord ).
>
You "think". Machetes were genocidal in Rwanda, why aren't you campaigning
against those? Compare the number of deaths due to machetes and depleted
uranium dust wielded by terrorists, and it's pretty apparent that you're
much ado about nothing.

> > What's your delivery method for affecting
> > hundreds and thousands of people? A flat file?
> >
>
> I;m not trying to do this. If you need a sceme to do this, there is
> something wrong here.
>
Your misplaced hysteria seems to be the only thing wrong here.
> >
> > > They are the same ones that said lead preservatives in vaccines are
> > > "Good For You".
> >
> > Cite?
> >
>
> It was peice that CBS news sent out to all it's local affiliates. It
> stated that "Lead Preservatives used in vaccines are actually <<good
> for you>>". It was picked up by www.prisonplanet.com Alex Jone's
> website. He is just reporting what CBS said, if you don't trust Alex
> Jones. Obviously Lead is not "Good For You".

How about a link to the actual CBS story? And I'm sure you realize that CBS
not longer has the authoritative edge it may have at one time.
>
>
> > > Lead causes brain damage, depleted uranium causes
> > > cancer.
> >
> > So don't eat it.
> > >
>
> yes I wouldn't recomend that. I would also say you shouldn't breath
> in the dust, though if you are within 1000 miles of Kabul, Baghdad,
> Bosnia, and other places where people are dropping shells made of DU
>
No one drops shells made of DU. It's not an element of bombs. It's main
benefit is that it is very dense, so it makes a great penetrator for kinetic
anti-armor rounds like those used in tank rounds and the 30mm gun in the
A-10.

There are so many other issues for you to get shrill about. How many kids
died in Iraq due to the sanctions? How come I've never seen a post from you
with the word "Sudan" in it. There are more people at risk there now than
have ever been affected by DU in any form.
>
> > > And to anyone who says differant I will pay you $5. Euros for every
> > > 10g you eat of powderd depleted Uranium. Go Ahead, feed it to your
> > > kids.
> >
> > Is sulfur a WMD?
>
> no sulfer actually kills bacteria and is used in medicines, or was
> until penicillian was discovered.
> Chlorine is considered a WMD apparently and that's why millions died
> of disentry in Iraq because they couldn't purify their water.
>
Cite? Millions dead of dysentary due to the non-availability of chlorine in
Iraq?

> > I sure wouldn't eat 10g of it, either. I wouldn't eat 10g
> > of dog feces for five Euros, but it's hardly a danger. Would you eat
that
> > much lead?
> >
>
> The Dog feces is more of a Fear Factor stunt, not something that you
> would want to eat, but rather harmless, unless the dog has worms. I'd
> say eating 10g of powdered Depleted Uranium would be enough to make
> some one really sick with serious long term health effects. The "what
> would you eat for $5 Euros"is beside the point. Would you eat 10g or
> powdered DU?
>
No, but there is a lot of stuff I wouldn't eat 10g of, lots of stuff right
in my house. Look, the amount of effort it would take to expose powdered DU
to a person in such a manner as to cause long-term problems is so many
orders of magnitude greater than the effort to build a car bomb or simply
walk up and shoot them, that there is simply no reason to spend any time
worrying about it.

Fix the Sudan problem. You have all the answers.

With a little research, google will tell you that I lean towards the
liberal, so don't go accusing me of being a right-wing head-in-the-sand
sociopath. The causes you embrace, the evidence you provide in support and
the manner in which you present your side only go to piss folks like me off,
because the conservatives lump us together.

Glenn D.
Anonymous
November 6, 2004 4:36:33 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Scott Dorsey wrote:


>>Is its melting point low like lead?
>
>
> It's not quite as low as lead and it's not quite as soft, but it's close.
> It's very ductile, not brittle.
>
> And yes, it will kill you. That's the whole point of bullets.

Strictly an academic question, but would it have any
advantage, outside of the military, for use as bullets?


Bob
--

"Things should be described as simply as possible, but no
simpler."

A. Einstein
Anonymous
November 6, 2004 7:18:41 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Nmm <voxman@arvotek.net> wrote:
>> >
>> > How about if we vapourize it near your kid's school?
>>
>> How will you do that?
>
>Does it matter how? You realy don't want your kids breathing it do
>you.

It's a metal... it does not vaporize easily. I spend half my day working
with molten lead with no fume hood, but the lead exposure from skin contact
is higher than what I get breathing. And I assure you that I am _very_
paranoid about heavy metal contamination.
--scott

--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
Anonymous
November 6, 2004 7:44:03 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

George Gleason wrote:

> That is why I wrote very little and claimed no expertize or desire to
> become the authoritive voice on depleted Uraninium

And you posted it into a group about audio instead of a group about
uranium because...???

--
ha
Anonymous
November 6, 2004 8:26:50 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

hank alrich wrote:
> George Gleason wrote:
>
>
>>That is why I wrote very little and claimed no expertize or desire to
>>become the authoritive voice on depleted Uraninium
>
>
> And you posted it into a group about audio instead of a group about
> uranium because...???
>
> --
> ha

beacuse I talk to the people I know.
G
Anonymous
November 6, 2004 9:00:42 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Bob Cain <arcane@arcanemethods.com> wrote:
>Scott Dorsey wrote:
>
>>>Is its melting point low like lead?
>>
>> It's not quite as low as lead and it's not quite as soft, but it's close.
>> It's very ductile, not brittle.
>>
>> And yes, it will kill you. That's the whole point of bullets.
>
>Strictly an academic question, but would it have any
>advantage, outside of the military, for use as bullets?

I don't have a good feel for the these things, but I could see that it
might be worthwhile to have a .22 deer rifle. It would have a bit of
a kick to it by .22 standards, though. Chakaal probably knows this stuff
better than I do, but it would be like effectively having a slightly larger
bullet because it would be a little heavier. Guys hunting elephant probably
need all the stopping power they can get, too.
--scott
--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
November 7, 2004 2:35:16 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On Fri, 05 Nov 2004 14:59:37 GMT, George Gleason
<g.p.gleason@worldnet.att.net> wrote:

>
>It seems the US government has been loading bombs with depleted uranium
>and dropping them on Iraq ,According to a History Channel show
>"sworn to secrecy" so far 630 THOUSAND TONS of nuke waste has been
>dumped in Iraq
>Makes one proud to be a American
>George

Well, they started it....
Anonymous
November 7, 2004 7:24:57 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

webmaster@mistral.net wrote:
> On Fri, 05 Nov 2004 14:59:37 GMT, George Gleason
> <g.p.gleason@worldnet.att.net> wrote:
>
>
>>It seems the US government has been loading bombs with depleted uranium
>>and dropping them on Iraq ,According to a History Channel show
>>"sworn to secrecy" so far 630 THOUSAND TONS of nuke waste has been
>>dumped in Iraq
>>Makes one proud to be a American
>>George
>
>
> Well, they started it....


Who?, When?, G
Anonymous
November 7, 2004 7:24:58 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

George Gleason wrote:

> webmaster@mistral.net wrote:
>>
>> Well, they started it....
>
> Who?, When?, G

That's what both of my housemates believe too. Both voted
for Bush. The regime's propeganda has been terrifyingly
effective with the undereducated. That's all and everything
that this election showed. Dr. Goebles is grinning ear to
ear despite the heat.


Bob
--

"Things should be described as simply as possible, but no
simpler."

A. Einstein
Anonymous
November 7, 2004 8:53:07 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Glenn Dowdy" <glenn.dowdy@commiecast.net> wrote in message news:<NL6dnTxexKU4vhDcRVn-vg@comcast.com>...
> "Nmm" <voxman@arvotek.net> wrote in message
> news:D 1a1b33a.0411061021.4f3aca47@posting.google.com...
> > "Glenn Dowdy" <glenn.no.dowdy@hpspam.com> wrote in message
> news:<uxTid.2475$1i3.1941@news.cpqcorp.net>...
> > > "Nmm" <voxman@arvotek.net> wrote in message
> > > news:D 1a1b33a.0411051438.62842929@posting.google.com...
> > > > kludge@panix.com (Scott Dorsey) wrote in message
> news:<cmg68k$pr$1@panix2.panix.com>...
> > > > > Mark Steven Brooks <elaterium@aol.com> wrote:
> > > > > ><<It's good stuff, actually. >>
> > > > > >
>
> Fix the Sudan problem. You have all the answers.
>

I really wish i knoew the solution or even the cause of the problems
in Sudan.I watched some of the C-Span coverage of the UN session on
Sudan just to see a bunch of people arguing about "what words apply to
the situation. MY general feelings on Africa is that the entire
continent should unite, one government and that these cliptocracies
should be put out of bussiness. THe problems are the artificial lines
that colonial powers used to carve the continent up. Selling them arms
is not the solution, though that's what the industrialised countries
seem to think.

The Iraq issue might be more prominent here, cause we'll be paying tax
money to send people we know over there.


> With a little research, google will tell you that I lean towards the
> liberal, so don't go accusing me of being a right-wing head-in-the-sand
> sociopath.

Sorry I didn't mean to come accross that way.. I think there are some
il health effects associated with vapourized DU. I know that that is
debatable, You can find sites with google on both sides of the issue.
My point is anyone who says it's inerte, Well here is $5 Euros , let
me see you eat some powdered DU?

>The causes you embrace, the evidence you provide in support and
> the manner in which you present your side only go to piss folks like me off,
> because the conservatives lump us together.
>
> Glenn D.

Some people in this newsgroup blindly follow their workplaces
politics. Such folks will play any trick, say anything to discredit
the people that speak out against them. I don;t know how much time in
my life i have to take apart all their arguments, and all the lies of
their posts here, or even the value of that.

I wouldn't take the aforementioneds views that seriously though,
Derision by association isn't much of an argument.

Cheers
Nick M M
Anonymous
November 7, 2004 11:40:20 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

kludge@panix.com (Scott Dorsey) wrote in message news:<cmg68k$pr$1@panix2.panix.com>...

> You should wash your hands after handling it, just like
> working with solder.


uh-oh...
Anonymous
November 7, 2004 8:29:48 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

I've never understood why nuclear waste could not be converted to a
form heavier than water and dumped into the deepest trench in the
ocean. Perhaps one of you who knows something about this can set me
straight.

Norm Strong
Anonymous
November 7, 2004 9:26:59 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

normanstrong wrote:

> I've never understood why nuclear waste could not be converted to a
> form heavier than water and dumped into the deepest trench in the
> ocean. Perhaps one of you who knows something about this can set me
> straight.

Leaching out into the ocean is the issue.

Nuclear waste from the UK reprocessing site at Windscale / Sellafield is
poured out into the Irish Sea. It's *meant* to be pretty benign now but
was once highly contaminated.

So much so that certain beaches nearby were closed off at one time.
Plutonium was washing ashore in solution, drying out and being carried
away by the wind IIRC.


Graham
Anonymous
November 8, 2004 3:45:25 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

> It's OK until you fire it down a gun barrel at high velocity and then
> bang it into armor plating. Some of it tends to get finely pulverized
> and oxidized. If you inhale the dust, that's bad. Worse than lead, in
> that respect, because it's more toxic.
>
> So you don't want to be on a battlefield where it's being used. Come
> to think of it, you probably don't want to be on a battlefield,
> period. As a turntable weight, it's probably as safe as lead.

OK, let me get this straight... We're trying to kill the guy behind the
plated armour... but in case he survives, we don't want him getting cancer
from the dust?
Anonymous
November 8, 2004 2:41:53 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Whew, what a stretch, dude. How about the fact that atomized DU wafts off
in the air, to either fields of corn or whatever consumable, or worse yet,
since we don't really seem to be concerned about Iraqi civilians, directly
into the air they breathe? Or, even worse, our own troops.

Did you know that Gulf War Syndrome has now been attributed to the small
possibility of exposure to Sarin gas (a 100 thousand strong), whilst there
are TONS of DU spread all over the countryside? Now that's a stretch. To
find an agent that has no empirical evidence to having been used vs a KNOWN
QUANTITY of DU, and yet it's the unknown that created syptoms of
neuroligical deterioration that is far more insipient and far less immediate
than Sarin would ever be. You don't have mental deterioation from Sarin 2,
5 or 10 years down the road. But you would with exposure to atomized
depleted Uranium. And as Scott has mentioned, we are talking about a Heavy
Metal, which might cause cancer, but most certainly will cause brain damage
over the long term.

So if you want my small opinion, based on dealing with Vets in VA hospitals
all over the US under less than ideal circumstances for determination of
cause, it seems to me that DU has a far more likely probability of causing
GW Syndrome than whether Sarin was released. Now I'm not a doctor nor a
research scientist, nor do I play one on my computer here in the studio, but
if Sarin was released in quantities that would adversely affect our
soldiers, the effects would have been almost immediate, not years later.
However, exposure to sufficient amounts of atomized depleted uranium would
have just the cumlative effect of slow neurological deterioration.

In terms of getting Vets their benefits for fighting for our country and
succumbing to this serious assault on their health, I don't care whether
it's Sarin or depleted uranium, but it's a good bet that the US isn't going
to admit that it was any byproduct of their military use of a certain
material when it's possible to blame in on the bad guys.

What most people don't seem to remember is that Sarin is only effective as
an aerosol and, just like mustard gas, is dependant upon the prevailing
winds, which can change in a second. Releasing such a weapon could and/or
would kill just as many of those who released the toxic substance as would
kill the enemy. And it wasn't like the Iraqi army, who were giving up in
droves, even had the opportunity to fire at what equated to at least 100,000
troops, many of whom contracted GWS without seeing combat but yet were
exposed to DU. Tank guys climbed into their tanks ten times a day, likely
grabbing DU armor on the way up. Infantry carried and fired DU weapons all
the time, even if they were just doing training.

So maybe we don't care that the troops of the enemy regime contract cancer,
but perhaps we could be a bit concerned that innocent civilians could be
spared just such a fate, much less spare our own troops from even the slight
possibility that our own munitions could be what effectively created an
entirely new sociological and physiological problem when they return home.

Remember, it was George Washington who said "The quality of America's
democracy is weighed by the manner in which their defenders are treated upon
returning home".

--


Roger W. Norman
SirMusic Studio

"Romeo Rondeau" <romeo@oakwoodrecordingstudio.com> wrote in message
news:10ou5f9lhmtk2d3@corp.supernews.com...
> > It's OK until you fire it down a gun barrel at high velocity and then
> > bang it into armor plating. Some of it tends to get finely pulverized
> > and oxidized. If you inhale the dust, that's bad. Worse than lead, in
> > that respect, because it's more toxic.
> >
> > So you don't want to be on a battlefield where it's being used. Come
> > to think of it, you probably don't want to be on a battlefield,
> > period. As a turntable weight, it's probably as safe as lead.
>
> OK, let me get this straight... We're trying to kill the guy behind the
> plated armour... but in case he survives, we don't want him getting cancer
> from the dust?
>
>
Anonymous
November 8, 2004 2:59:52 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Hell, even aluminium is low in terms of producing toxic vapors. The
original Bradley would burn at 800 degrees F, which, even if troops in the
transport would survive a strike that set the vehicle shell to burning,
would succumb to the vapors within seconds.

I believe there was an HBO movie about this, although it was somewhat a
comedy or mockumentary, called "The Pentagon Wars" which represents a lot of
the truth behind the testing of America's military weaponry.

But considering that lead can be relegated to a molten state with a
acetylene tank (I used to do plumbing and so would work with cast iron and
lead solder), I'd say that the max temperature would be about 1200 degrees
F. Interestingly enough, it took the EPA until 1986 to outlaw the use of
lead pipes and lead solder for potable water. And 5 years later we're
dumping tons of DU on Iraq and wondering why our soldiers are coming back
and ending up somewhat less than they were when the left.

Since we have an entire new army, who, btw, DID NOT get their physical
analysis prior to shipping out, which IS THE LAW OF THE LAND, then we'll
just have to see how it turns out when our troops start coming home en
masse. My guess is that, again, regardless of the expansive use of DU by
American troops and armored weapons systems, it will blamed on the even less
verified release of some Sarin gas that apparently hasn't been in Iraq's
stockpile of usable weapons (remember, Sarin has about a 3 year shelf life)
since 1991 (re: American weapons inspectors appointed by Bush).

--


Roger W. Norman
SirMusic Studio

"Bob Cain" <arcane@arcanemethods.com> wrote in message
news:cmi536027f0@enews1.newsguy.com...
>
>
> Scott Dorsey wrote:
>
> > George Gleason <g.p.gleason@att.net> wrote:
> >
> >>It seems the US government has been loading bombs with depleted uranium
> >>and dropping them on Iraq ,According to a History Channel show
> >>"sworn to secrecy" so far 630 THOUSAND TONS of nuke waste has been
> >>dumped in Iraq
> >>Makes one proud to be a American
> >
> >
> > It's good stuff, actually. It's extremely dense, and while it's a
little
> > more toxic than lead (mostly because of slightly better solubility), it
is
> > no more radioactive than a brick and a bit less radioactive than a
cigarette.
>
> Is its melting point low like lead?
>
>
> Thanks,
>
> Bob
> --
>
> "Things should be described as simply as possible, but no
> simpler."
>
> A. Einstein
Anonymous
November 8, 2004 3:10:11 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

It's extremely dense, hence, can fend off munitions that don't match up to
either the velocity necessary to penetrate it, or a greater density
necessary to penetrate it. In terms of shoulder based weapons, velocity
isn't possible or it would simply bowl over the person firing the weapon and
generally mean a missed target. In terms of density, then a DU bullet can
penetrate lesser dense defensive armor, and either fragment killing or
wounding those inside, or simply richochet around inside the vehicle until
it's velocity is spent.

In armor on fighting vehicles, like the Bradley, DU is pretty darned good at
dispensing explosive rounds like RPGs, etc., but the cost is that some
amount is dispersed into the air. I guess one could consider this a toxic
equivalent to a scorched earth policy, since one is leaving plenty of
material that has no ability to deplete further and will forevermore be in
the foodchain if that land is ever used for agricultural purposes.

DU is dense enough to help shield our troops, but it's also leaving a track
of particles that never leave. A better solution, although far more
expensive, is explosive shielding, which immediately reacts to an attempt at
penetration and explodes to counteract the kinetic energy of the offensive
weapon. The problem is replacement costs, which is what lead the US
military to lean towards superior density.

--


Roger W. Norman
SirMusic Studio

"Bob Cain" <arcane@arcanemethods.com> wrote in message
news:cmjg4v0139u@enews3.newsguy.com...
>
>
> Scott Dorsey wrote:
>
>
> >>Is its melting point low like lead?
> >
> >
> > It's not quite as low as lead and it's not quite as soft, but it's
close.
> > It's very ductile, not brittle.
> >
> > And yes, it will kill you. That's the whole point of bullets.
>
> Strictly an academic question, but would it have any
> advantage, outside of the military, for use as bullets?
>
>
> Bob
> --
>
> "Things should be described as simply as possible, but no
> simpler."
>
> A. Einstein
Anonymous
November 8, 2004 3:36:08 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Actually, you're wrong and right at the same time. Spent uranium means that
it has actually digressed from it's reasonably active isotopic state (i.e.
it's actually not uranium 238 or 236 anymore but some more stabile form like
U230 or whatever), but that doesn't mean that it doesn't have a half life.
It's only those highly active half-lives that are usable for fissile
material. I assume that if rocks needed an energy source they could
probably sit around and wait for the thousands of years necessary for the DU
to emit another electron, but for purposes of use in warming up water or
causing extreme damage by forced fission, then it's a practical
impossibility for normal human lifetimes. But all things have some level of
half-life. It's just that a nuclear reaction that takes 100 million years
isn't practical or useful (and probably not even noticeable).

But that has nothing to do with the possibility of deliterious effects based
on the mass covering of areas with tons of depleted uranium. Since it won't
go away, it can get into the food chain and cause problems 20, 30 or even 50
years down the road.

If we "jokingly" talk about the dumbing down of America, then it's more to
the point that anyone left with our DU in their soil will ultimately end up
being dummied down by exposure over a significant period of time. I assume
that, even in the depleted form the half-life could have enough of a marked
effect over a few thousand years as to create a number of mutations in both
genetical makeup of humans or other flora/fauna, and probably, at just the
right time, things like virii (although the dictionary says viruses, my
Latin background says virii) and bacteria.

Highly unlikely, but it's the odd mutation from some simple little single
cosmic radiation that has been accredited with the advancement of humans
(and virtually all evolution) and thus civilization. Perhaps we can
undercut nature and dumb ourselves back down to the point where sitting in
trees and eating fruit is the real evolutionary branch of humans, and
IRON-ically (a small play on words, as ultimately uranium would
radioactively become iron over millions of years), it would be by our own
hands.

--


Roger W. Norman
SirMusic Studio

"Pooh Bear" <rabbitsfriendsandrelations@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:418BECA1.51BFA63D@hotmail.com...
>
>
> George Gleason wrote:
>
> > It seems the US government has been loading bombs with depleted uranium
> > and dropping them on Iraq ,According to a History Channel show
> > "sworn to secrecy" so far 630 THOUSAND TONS of nuke waste has been
> > dumped in Iraq
> > Makes one proud to be a American
>
> Sorry George but depleted uranium isn't 'nuclear waste' other than maybe
> that it's no good ( waste ? ) for use in nuclear reactors since it isn't
> fissile.
>
> It's used for armour piercing shells on account of its high mass.
>
>
> Graham
>
>
>
Anonymous
November 8, 2004 3:41:20 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Because deplete uranium is such a dense material that, when carved up into 3
micron thick sections, and then used as the element in a capsule, has a
response curve of 4.5 billion years to 1.2 pico-seconds, meaning that it can
capture all of history, or the last little bit of humanity. Hell of a mic,
if you ask me! <g>

--


Roger W. Norman
SirMusic Studio

"hank alrich" <walkinay@thegrid.net> wrote in message
news:1gmtmu5.exky33epratuN%walkinay@thegrid.net...
> George Gleason wrote:
>
> > That is why I wrote very little and claimed no expertize or desire to
> > become the authoritive voice on depleted Uraninium
>
> And you posted it into a group about audio instead of a group about
> uranium because...???
>
> --
> ha
Anonymous
November 8, 2004 4:04:41 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Romeo Rondeau" <romeo@oakwoodrecordingstudio.com> wrote in message news:<10ou5f9lhmtk2d3@corp.supernews.com>...
> > It's OK until you fire it down a gun barrel at high velocity and then
> > bang it into armor plating. Some of it tends to get finely pulverized
> > and oxidized. If you inhale the dust, that's bad. Worse than lead, in
> > that respect, because it's more toxic.
> >
> > So you don't want to be on a battlefield where it's being used. Come
> > to think of it, you probably don't want to be on a battlefield,
> > period. As a turntable weight, it's probably as safe as lead.
>
> OK, let me get this straight... We're trying to kill the guy behind the
> plated armour... but in case he survives, we don't want him getting cancer
> from the dust?


No you don't want your guys getting cancer/ gulf war syndrome, and
everyone in a 1000 mile radius getting cancer/ gulf war syndrome.

Right now the Iraqi counterinsurgents are not behind any plated
armour anyway.
Anonymous
November 8, 2004 8:54:14 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Roger W. Norman" <rnorman@starpower.net> wrote in message
news:7PKdncFsaqk9PBLcRVn-jA@rcn.net...

> Did you know that Gulf War Syndrome has now been attributed to the small
> possibility of exposure to Sarin gas (a 100 thousand strong), whilst there
> are TONS of DU spread all over the countryside?

Do you have a cite on the tonnage of DU?

Glenn D.
Anonymous
November 8, 2004 8:54:15 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Didn't you read George's original post relating to a reported tonnage of 630
thousand tons? Even if it were somewhere on the order of 1% of that, we're
still talking about a lot of tons of material.

--


Roger W. Norman
SirMusic Studio

"Glenn Dowdy" <glenn.no.dowdy@hpspam.com> wrote in message
news:apOjd.2518$Q%6.2224@news.cpqcorp.net...
>
> "Roger W. Norman" <rnorman@starpower.net> wrote in message
> news:7PKdncFsaqk9PBLcRVn-jA@rcn.net...
>
> > Did you know that Gulf War Syndrome has now been attributed to the small
> > possibility of exposure to Sarin gas (a 100 thousand strong), whilst
there
> > are TONS of DU spread all over the countryside?
>
> Do you have a cite on the tonnage of DU?
>
> Glenn D.
>
>
Anonymous
November 8, 2004 9:07:57 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Roger W. Norman" <rnorman@starpower.net> wrote in message
news:YIydnSTXDahAMxLcRVn-ow@rcn.net...
> And how did they measure the half-life? Wait around 4.5 billion years
> before coming up with the result?
>
Um, no.

http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/nuclear/half...

Glenn D.
Anonymous
November 8, 2004 9:07:58 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

It was just a joke, but obviously it's a joke on me because it backfired.

I remember reading an article by Isaac Asimov about what the next elements
on the periodic table would be and what the characteristics of their
properties would be. Interesting article, but alas, since we were created
by the refuse of a second order sun, those elements weren't created.
Unfortunately it will take hundreds of millions of years more before we'd
have even the possibility of actually running into naturally occurring
elements that hadn't been created by whatever supernova that spread our
elements out over the cosmos to be incorporated into our existence.


--


Roger W. Norman
SirMusic Studio

"Glenn Dowdy" <glenn.no.dowdy@hpspam.com> wrote in message
news:1COjd.2520$M07.1479@news.cpqcorp.net...
>
> "Roger W. Norman" <rnorman@starpower.net> wrote in message
> news:YIydnSTXDahAMxLcRVn-ow@rcn.net...
> > And how did they measure the half-life? Wait around 4.5 billion years
> > before coming up with the result?
> >
> Um, no.
>
> http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/nuclear/half...
>
> Glenn D.
>
>
Anonymous
November 8, 2004 9:15:24 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Glenn Dowdy wrote:
> "Roger W. Norman" <rnorman@starpower.net> wrote in message
> news:7PKdncFsaqk9PBLcRVn-jA@rcn.net...
>
>
>>Did you know that Gulf War Syndrome has now been attributed to the small
>>possibility of exposure to Sarin gas (a 100 thousand strong), whilst there
>>are TONS of DU spread all over the countryside?
>
>
> Do you have a cite on the tonnage of DU?
>
> Glenn D.
>

History channel on "sworn to secrecy" stated 630 thousand tons so far
George
Anonymous
November 8, 2004 9:15:25 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

George Gleason <g.p.gleason@att.net> wrote:
>Glenn Dowdy wrote:
>> "Roger W. Norman" <rnorman@starpower.net> wrote in message
>> news:7PKdncFsaqk9PBLcRVn-jA@rcn.net...
>>
>>>Did you know that Gulf War Syndrome has now been attributed to the small
>>>possibility of exposure to Sarin gas (a 100 thousand strong), whilst there
>>>are TONS of DU spread all over the countryside?
>>
>> Do you have a cite on the tonnage of DU?
>
> History channel on "sworn to secrecy" stated 630 thousand tons so far

That's a lot, but what sort of tonnage of lead?

I'm not saying uranium isn't bad for you, I'm just saying that lead is also
bad for you. And leftover land mines are really, really bad for you.
And I would worry much more about unexploded ordinance than any of these
things... how many dud bombs and shells are lying around there now? I bet
an awful lot.
--scott
--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
Anonymous
November 8, 2004 9:15:26 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Where does stupidity begin on any of these questions, Scott? How about NOT
doing what's bad for you? Isn't that the real idea?

--


Roger W. Norman
SirMusic Studio

"Scott Dorsey" <kludge@panix.com> wrote in message
news:cmoek2$rrj$1@panix2.panix.com...
> George Gleason <g.p.gleason@att.net> wrote:
> >Glenn Dowdy wrote:
> >> "Roger W. Norman" <rnorman@starpower.net> wrote in message
> >> news:7PKdncFsaqk9PBLcRVn-jA@rcn.net...
> >>
> >>>Did you know that Gulf War Syndrome has now been attributed to the
small
> >>>possibility of exposure to Sarin gas (a 100 thousand strong), whilst
there
> >>>are TONS of DU spread all over the countryside?
> >>
> >> Do you have a cite on the tonnage of DU?
> >
> > History channel on "sworn to secrecy" stated 630 thousand tons so far
>
> That's a lot, but what sort of tonnage of lead?
>
> I'm not saying uranium isn't bad for you, I'm just saying that lead is
also
> bad for you. And leftover land mines are really, really bad for you.
> And I would worry much more about unexploded ordinance than any of these
> things... how many dud bombs and shells are lying around there now? I bet
> an awful lot.
> --scott
> --
> "C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
Anonymous
November 8, 2004 9:15:27 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Roger W. Norman <rnorman@starpower.net> wrote:
>Where does stupidity begin on any of these questions, Scott? How about NOT
>doing what's bad for you? Isn't that the real idea?

Well, that would probably involve not going to war at all, and it's way, way
too late for that one.
--scott

--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
Anonymous
November 8, 2004 9:39:54 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Roger W. Norman <rnorman@starpower.net> wrote:
> It was just a joke, but obviously it's a joke on me because it backfired.

> I remember reading an article by Isaac Asimov about what the next elements
> on the periodic table would be and what the characteristics of their
> properties would be. Interesting article, but alas, since we were created
> by the refuse of a second order sun, those elements weren't created.
> Unfortunately it will take hundreds of millions of years more before we'd
> have even the possibility of actually running into naturally occurring
> elements that hadn't been created by whatever supernova that spread our
> elements out over the cosmos to be incorporated into our existence.

Shooting stars never stop
even when they reach the top
Here comes a supernova
what a pushova, yeah

(FGTH sometime in the eighties)

Rob R.
Anonymous
November 8, 2004 9:39:55 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Don't recognize the reference, but I didn't pay a lot of attention to music
in the eighties, or at least the music OF the eighties. Did my own, still
sitting on my shelves! <g>

The point was that third order suns that ultimately create heavier atoms
won't be dying for a while. And it's got to be a HUGE sun to start fusing
even heavier atoms for fuel. Perhaps it's just a fuelish thought.

--


Roger W. Norman
SirMusic Studio

"Rob Reedijk" <reedijk@hera.med.utoronto.ca> wrote in message
news:cmoehq$2t0$1@news1.chem.utoronto.ca...
> Roger W. Norman <rnorman@starpower.net> wrote:
> > It was just a joke, but obviously it's a joke on me because it
backfired.
>
> > I remember reading an article by Isaac Asimov about what the next
elements
> > on the periodic table would be and what the characteristics of their
> > properties would be. Interesting article, but alas, since we were
created
> > by the refuse of a second order sun, those elements weren't created.
> > Unfortunately it will take hundreds of millions of years more before
we'd
> > have even the possibility of actually running into naturally occurring
> > elements that hadn't been created by whatever supernova that spread our
> > elements out over the cosmos to be incorporated into our existence.
>
> Shooting stars never stop
> even when they reach the top
> Here comes a supernova
> what a pushova, yeah
>
> (FGTH sometime in the eighties)
>
> Rob R.
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