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Drum Mic Setup

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Anonymous
November 9, 2004 1:29:44 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

I'd like to record drums using only 4 relatively inexpensive microphones.
Probably one on the kick, one on the snare and two overhead.

Any recommendations on inexpensive mics to do the job and/or alternative
micing setup.

Thanks as always

More about : drum mic setup

Anonymous
November 9, 2004 1:29:45 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Sanbar <sanbar@wi.rr.com> wrote:
>I'd like to record drums using only 4 relatively inexpensive microphones.
>Probably one on the kick, one on the snare and two overhead.
>
>Any recommendations on inexpensive mics to do the job and/or alternative
>micing setup.

Take all the money you have and invest it in two of the best small diaphragm
condenser mikes you can afford.

Put whatever dynamic mike you can find in the junk box on the kick drum.
Unless it's a closed kick in which case careful positioning of the two
overheads will get you a good kick sound too.
--scott

--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
Anonymous
November 9, 2004 2:11:38 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

>I'd like to record drums using only 4 relatively inexpensive microphones.
>Probably one on the kick, one on the snare and two overhead.
>
>Any recommendations on inexpensive mics to do the job and/or alternative
>micing setup.
>
>Thanks as always
>

With those limited specifications, try the following:

1- Audio-Technica ATM25 for kick
2- Marshall MXL603s condensers for overheads
1- Shure SM57 for snare.

That's about $450 not counting stands etc.

--Wayne

-"sounded good to me"-
Related resources
Anonymous
November 9, 2004 2:11:39 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

> 1- Audio-Technica ATM25 for kick
> 2- Marshall MXL603s condensers for overheads
> 1- Shure SM57 for snare.
>


I disagree on the marshalls for a 4 mic setup. They are very scooped
in the mids. On a budget, I prefer the SP C4 for getting a good
picture of the kit. They have less of an upper mid/treble spike
(though they do have some pleasant unnaturalness in the high end) and
are much fuller and natural in the midrange.

Another option is to get a pair of the SP B1s. I have never used them,
but they seem to be a decent inexpensive option.
Anonymous
November 9, 2004 5:38:27 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On 08 Nov 2004 23:11:38 GMT, ybstudios@aol.com (Wayne) wrote:

>>I'd like to record drums using only 4 relatively inexpensive microphones.
>>Probably one on the kick, one on the snare and two overhead.
>>
>>Any recommendations on inexpensive mics to do the job and/or alternative
>>micing setup.
>>
>>Thanks as always
>>
>
>With those limited specifications, try the following:
>
>1- Audio-Technica ATM25 for kick
>2- Marshall MXL603s condensers for overheads
>1- Shure SM57 for snare.
>
>That's about $450 not counting stands etc.
>
>--Wayne
>
>-"sounded good to me"-

You won't do better than Wayne's list.

Mike T.
Anonymous
November 9, 2004 8:39:28 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

>On 08 Nov 2004 23:11:38 GMT, ybstudios@aol.com (Wayne) wrote:
>
>>>I'd like to record drums using only 4 relatively inexpensive microphones.
>>>Probably one on the kick, one on the snare and two overhead.
>>>
>>>Any recommendations on inexpensive mics to do the job and/or alternative
>>>micing setup.
>>>
>>>Thanks as always
>>>
>>
>>With those limited specifications, try the following:
>>
>>1- Audio-Technica ATM25 for kick
>>2- Marshall MXL603s condensers for overheads
>>1- Shure SM57 for snare.
>>
>>That's about $450 not counting stands etc.
>>
>>--Wayne
>>
>>-"sounded good to me"-
>
>You won't do better than Wayne's list.
>
>Mike T.
>

Yes, that is a good starter set up (but no where close to professional) but you
should also look at placement of the kit in the room. Make more than one take
of the same song in different spots in the room your recording in (keep the
best sounding one) and pay close attention to where your aiming the mics on the
kit to.
I can say from way back in the early 80's I did some fare sounding drum takes
with a Fostex X15 and one omni mic (SM 58 copy) 1/2 foot in front, off the top
edge of the bass drum pointing it at the floor.
Anonymous
November 9, 2004 12:29:28 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On Mon, 8 Nov 2004 21:38:27 -0500, Mike T. wrote
(in article <hcb0p0desta675a96uum9fl8a3ntt5r6e0@4ax.com>):

> On 08 Nov 2004 23:11:38 GMT, ybstudios@aol.com (Wayne) wrote:
>
>>> I'd like to record drums using only 4 relatively inexpensive microphones.
>>> Probably one on the kick, one on the snare and two overhead.
>>>
>>> Any recommendations on inexpensive mics to do the job and/or alternative
>>> micing setup.
>>>
>>> Thanks as always
>>>
>>
>> With those limited specifications, try the following:
>>
>> 1- Audio-Technica ATM25 for kick
>> 2- Marshall MXL603s condensers for overheads
>> 1- Shure SM57 for snare.
>>
>> That's about $450 not counting stands etc.
>>
>> --Wayne
>>
>> -"sounded good to me"-
>
> You won't do better than Wayne's list.
>
> Mike T.

try 2 Rode NT5 or one NT4 for the overheads.

Regards,

Ty Ford



-- Ty Ford's equipment reviews, audio samples, rates and other audiocentric
stuff are at www.tyford.com
Anonymous
November 9, 2004 9:57:43 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Sanbar" <sanbar@wi.rr.com> wrote in message
news:srSjd.35998$ye4.24992@twister.rdc-kc.rr.com...
> I'd like to record drums using only 4 relatively inexpensive microphones.
> Probably one on the kick, one on the snare and two overhead.
>
> Any recommendations on inexpensive mics to do the job and/or alternative
> micing setup.
>
> Thanks as always
>
>

Has anyone tried using the Behringer reference mic for recording?
do they sound any good at all?
I have used them when I had nothing else for O/H mics in a live situation.
they worked well there but I have never done any critical listening with
them.
and they are the cheapest condensers out there I think.

Doug
Anonymous
November 9, 2004 9:57:44 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Doug Schultz <Douglas_Schultz@hotmail.com> wrote:
>
>Has anyone tried using the Behringer reference mic for recording?
>do they sound any good at all?
>I have used them when I had nothing else for O/H mics in a live situation.
>they worked well there but I have never done any critical listening with
>them.
>and they are the cheapest condensers out there I think.

Yes. They are pretty good about sounding the same off-axis as on-axis,
which is very important. They are noisy, which doesn't matter for drum
mikes, and they are gritty on top, which is still pretty good when you
consider how cheap they are.
--scott

--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
Anonymous
November 9, 2004 11:01:11 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On Tue, 09 Nov 2004 18:57:43 GMT, "Doug Schultz"
<Douglas_Schultz@hotmail.com> wrote:

>
>"Sanbar" <sanbar@wi.rr.com> wrote in message
>news:srSjd.35998$ye4.24992@twister.rdc-kc.rr.com...
>> I'd like to record drums using only 4 relatively inexpensive microphones.
>> Probably one on the kick, one on the snare and two overhead.
>>
>> Any recommendations on inexpensive mics to do the job and/or alternative
>> micing setup.
>>
>> Thanks as always
>>
>>
>
>Has anyone tried using the Behringer reference mic for recording?
>do they sound any good at all?
>I have used them when I had nothing else for O/H mics in a live situation.
>they worked well there but I have never done any critical listening with
>them.
>and they are the cheapest condensers out there I think.
>
>Doug
>
I frequently use one on hi-hat, rarely anywhere else.
Mike T.
Anonymous
November 10, 2004 12:09:30 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <Hq8kd.165568$Pl.83558@pd7tw1no> Douglas_Schultz@hotmail.com writes:

> Has anyone tried using the Behringer reference mic for recording?
> do they sound any good at all?

The only bad thing that I've heard about this mic is that it has a
somewhat higher noise level than most. This shouldn't be a problem
with a powerful drummer.

Earthworks, which makes more expensive mics that are built like
measurement mics introduced a drum mic set at the AES show that
consists of two omnis and a cardioid (or three cardioids in the live
sound version) plus an in-line device which is both a pad and a low
frequency response shaper for the kick. I've done some pretty decent
jazz drums using two omnis as kind of "underheads" - in front of the
kit aiming at about 2 o'clock and 10 o'clock looking down from the top
with the kick at 12 o'clock, underneath the cymbals and over the toms.
That plus a kick mic and a distant mic behind the drummer can work
nicely.


--
I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
Anonymous
November 10, 2004 12:12:03 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In addition to the recommendations already made, check out the
Mercenary Audio site for Fletcher's article on drum micing, which
included 2 and 3 mike setups.

On Mon, 08 Nov 2004 22:29:44 GMT, "Sanbar" <sanbar@wi.rr.com> wrote:

>I'd like to record drums using only 4 relatively inexpensive microphones.
>Probably one on the kick, one on the snare and two overhead.
>
>Any recommendations on inexpensive mics to do the job and/or alternative
>micing setup.
>
>Thanks as always
>
>

Willie K. Yee, M.D. http://users.bestweb.net/~wkyee
Developer of Problem Knowledge Couplers for Psychiatry http://www.pkc.com
Webmaster and Guitarist for the Big Blue Big Band http://www.bigbluebigband.org
Anonymous
November 10, 2004 12:36:09 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

You didn't specify the style of music or the sound you wanted, but I'd
consider a single overhead and a single room mic for the 3rd and 4th
mics.
Anonymous
November 10, 2004 12:47:50 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <znr1100041885k@trad>, Mike Rivers <mrivers@d-and-d.com> wrote:
>In article <Hq8kd.165568$Pl.83558@pd7tw1no> Douglas_Schultz@hotmail.com writes:
>
>> Has anyone tried using the Behringer reference mic for recording?
>> do they sound any good at all?
>
>The only bad thing that I've heard about this mic is that it has a
>somewhat higher noise level than most. This shouldn't be a problem
>with a powerful drummer.
>
>Earthworks, which makes more expensive mics that are built like
>measurement mics introduced a drum mic set at the AES show that
>consists of two omnis and a cardioid (or three cardioids in the live
>sound version) plus an in-line device which is both a pad and a low
>frequency response shaper for the kick. I've done some pretty decent
>jazz drums using two omnis as kind of "underheads" - in front of the
>kit aiming at about 2 o'clock and 10 o'clock looking down from the top
>with the kick at 12 o'clock, underneath the cymbals and over the toms.
>That plus a kick mic and a distant mic behind the drummer can work
>nicely.

The Behringer, in fact, has a Chinese copy of the Japanese capsule that
Earthworks (and a lot of other inexpensive omni) mikes use. The electronics
leave something to be desired, but for $35, who cares?
--scott
--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
Anonymous
November 10, 2004 10:58:07 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Doug Schultz" <Douglas_Schultz@hotmail.com> wrote in message

> Has anyone tried using the Behringer reference mic for recording?
> do they sound any good at all?
> I have used them when I had nothing else for O/H mics in a live situation.
> they worked well there but I have never done any critical listening with
> them.
> and they are the cheapest condensers out there I think.

I use one in a live situation to feed me IEMs. I have also used the
MXL603s for the same purpose. Here's the pros and cons as I've seen
them - and how I think they'd extrapolate into a recording environ:

I prefer the Behringer for live use becuase it's OMNI and pics up more
of the surroundings. (other instruments, crowd noise etc...) It
makes the cymbals come together and let you feel less isolated in the
IEMs. For recording - I think they'd be good to pick up the room.

The MXL603s eats the B for lunch when it comes to sounding good.
Cymbals are more natural (better stick definition and character), but
they don't pick up the room as well - for recording - I'd prefer the
Marshall 85% of the time.

Erich
Anonymous
November 10, 2004 4:15:08 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

kludge@panix.com (Scott Dorsey) wrote in message news:<cmotvf$2dm$1@panix2.panix.com>...
> Sanbar <sanbar@wi.rr.com> wrote:
-snip-
> Put whatever dynamic mike you can find in the junk box on the kick drum.
> Unless it's a closed kick in which case careful positioning of the two
> overheads will get you a good kick sound too.
> --scott

....or for a closed kik, any old omni dynamic placed close would work too.
Anonymous
November 10, 2004 10:58:47 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Mike Caffrey" <mike@monsterisland.com> wrote in message
news:9b30ebb8.0411092136.24b3dcca@posting.google.com...
> You didn't specify the style of music or the sound you wanted, but I'd
> consider a single overhead and a single room mic for the 3rd and 4th
> mics.

only problem with that is that you have no stereo imaging then.
I for one like to hear the cymbals in the proper place around the sound
stage.


Doug
Anonymous
November 11, 2004 2:38:31 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Doug Schultz" <Douglas_Schultz@hotmail.com> wrote in message news:<Xpukd.179771$%k.133799@pd7tw2no>...
> "Mike Caffrey" <mike@monsterisland.com> wrote in message
> news:9b30ebb8.0411092136.24b3dcca@posting.google.com...
> > You didn't specify the style of music or the sound you wanted, but I'd
> > consider a single overhead and a single room mic for the 3rd and 4th
> > mics.
>
> only problem with that is that you have no stereo imaging then.
> I for one like to hear the cymbals in the proper place around the sound
> stage.
>
>
> Doug

That's why i said it depends on the style of music. A guitar oriented
hard rock band doesn't really need stereo drum mics and might benefit
more from the sound of a compressed room mic.

It's just somehting to consider.

THere are plety of great jazz recordings with mono drums too.
November 17, 2004 3:51:15 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Mike Caffrey wrote:
> "Doug Schultz" <Douglas_Schultz@hotmail.com> wrote in message news:<Xpukd.179771$%k.133799@pd7tw2no>...
>
>>"Mike Caffrey" <mike@monsterisland.com> wrote in message
>>news:9b30ebb8.0411092136.24b3dcca@posting.google.com...
>>
>>>You didn't specify the style of music or the sound you wanted, but I'd
>>>consider a single overhead and a single room mic for the 3rd and 4th
>>>mics.
>>
>>only problem with that is that you have no stereo imaging then.
>>I for one like to hear the cymbals in the proper place around the sound
>>stage.
>>
>>
>>Doug
>
>
> That's why i said it depends on the style of music. A guitar oriented
> hard rock band doesn't really need stereo drum mics and might benefit
> more from the sound of a compressed room mic.
>
> It's just somehting to consider.
>
> THere are plety of great jazz recordings with mono drums too.

get a pair of akg c430's. musicians friend is selling them for 200 a
pair. good oh mics. cant go wrong.
Anonymous
November 18, 2004 2:38:17 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

kludge@panix.com (Scott Dorsey) wrote in message news:<cmrvgm$k57$1@panix2.panix.com>...
> In article <znr1100041885k@trad>, Mike Rivers <mrivers@d-and-d.com> wrote:
> >In article <Hq8kd.165568$Pl.83558@pd7tw1no> Douglas_Schultz@hotmail.com writes:
> >
> >> Has anyone tried using the Behringer reference mic for recording?
> >> do they sound any good at all?
> >
> >The only bad thing that I've heard about this mic is that it has a
> >somewhat higher noise level than most. This shouldn't be a problem
> >with a powerful drummer.
> >
> >Earthworks, which makes more expensive mics that are built like
> >measurement mics introduced a drum mic set at the AES show that
> >consists of two omnis and a cardioid (or three cardioids in the live
> >sound version) plus an in-line device which is both a pad and a low
> >frequency response shaper for the kick. I've done some pretty decent
> >jazz drums using two omnis as kind of "underheads" - in front of the
> >kit aiming at about 2 o'clock and 10 o'clock looking down from the top
> >with the kick at 12 o'clock, underneath the cymbals and over the toms.
> >That plus a kick mic and a distant mic behind the drummer can work
> >nicely.
>
> The Behringer, in fact, has a Chinese copy of the Japanese capsule that
> Earthworks (and a lot of other inexpensive omni) mikes use. The electronics
> leave something to be desired, but for $35, who cares?
> --scott

An interesting side note: The bodies for the Behringer measurement
mics (as well as the bodies used by Josephson) are made by the German
firm of MBHO.
Anonymous
November 18, 2004 4:59:13 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

joelinnyc@yahoo.com (J.M.) wrote:

>kludge@panix.com (Scott Dorsey) wrote:
>> Mike Rivers <mrivers@d-and-d.com> wrote:
>> >Douglas_Schultz@hotmail.com writes:
>> >
>> >> Has anyone tried using the Behringer reference mic for recording?
>> >> do they sound any good at all?

>> >The only bad thing that I've heard about this mic is that it has a
>> >somewhat higher noise level than most. This shouldn't be a problem
>> >with a powerful drummer.

>> >Earthworks, which makes more expensive mics that are built like
>> >measurement mics introduced a drum mic set at the AES show that
>> >consists of two omnis and a cardioid (or three cardioids in the live
>> >sound version) plus an in-line device which is both a pad and a low
>> >frequency response shaper for the kick. I've done some pretty decent
>> >jazz drums using two omnis as kind of "underheads" - in front of the
>> >kit aiming at about 2 o'clock and 10 o'clock looking down from the top
>> >with the kick at 12 o'clock, underneath the cymbals and over the toms.
>> >That plus a kick mic and a distant mic behind the drummer can work
>> >nicely.

>> The Behringer, in fact, has a Chinese copy of the Japanese capsule that
>> Earthworks (and a lot of other inexpensive omni) mikes use. The electronics
>> leave something to be desired, but for $35, who cares?
>> --scott

>An interesting side note: The bodies for the Behringer measurement
>mics (as well as the bodies used by Josephson) are made by the German
>firm of MBHO.

The body is also identical to the Audix TR-40.

Harvey Gerst
Indian Trail Recording Studio
http://www.ITRstudio.com/
Anonymous
November 18, 2004 9:34:10 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Sanbar" <sanbar@wi.rr.com> wrote in message news:<srSjd.35998$ye4.24992@twister.rdc-kc.rr.com>...
> I'd like to record drums using only 4 relatively inexpensive microphones.
> Probably one on the kick, one on the snare and two overhead.
>
> Any recommendations on inexpensive mics to do the job and/or alternative
> micing setup.
>
> Thanks as always

I think that would work just fine. I would try to get the kick and the
snare very isolated by wrapping foam in a conical shape or (some
people claim car mats work good) around the mic and place them as
close as you can to the kick and snare. The snare especially will pick
up a lot of highhat unless you isolate it (you could gate it later
also). Since you already have the mics I would disregard the advice of
the audio snobs here wanting you to go out and spend another $400. You
can do a hell of a lot more to get the tone you want with plug ins or
mixer effects later.
Anonymous
November 19, 2004 12:11:45 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In <c0875d5a.0411181138.10d5d1e7@posting.google.com> joelinnyc@yahoo.com (J.M.) writes:

<snip>

>> The Behringer, in fact, has a Chinese copy of the Japanese capsule that
>> Earthworks (and a lot of other inexpensive omni) mikes use. The electronics
>> leave something to be desired, but for $35, who cares?
>> --scott

>An interesting side note: The bodies for the Behringer measurement
>mics (as well as the bodies used by Josephson) are made by the German
>firm of MBHO.

Actually, no, and I am surprised that someone would post conjecture as
fact. There has been no connection between us and MB QUART (or its
successor in the microphone business, MBHO) since 1990. We imported the
C550 microphone from MB for a couple of years (1988-89) but for a
number of reasons we elected to build our own version from 1990 onwards.
The bodies used by Josephson for many years were made in a screw machine
shop in Campbell, California, near San Jose, plated in Sacramento and
assembled in our shop. Recently we have bought them from a shop in
Washington. I expect that the Behringer bodies are made where the rest
of the mic is made, in China. There are several other lookalikes of
this microphone, mostly from Taiwan and Korea. The difference in price
between these various models generally translates into the consistency
from one unit to the next, and how closely the mics are calibrated. Our
C550H mics are calibrated to 10 mV/Pa within +/- 0.25 dB at 1 kHz.

--David Josephson / Josephson Engineering Inc. / www.josephson.com
--
Josephson Engineering / Santa Cruz CA / www.josephson.com
November 20, 2004 12:20:28 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On 18 Nov 2004 18:34:10 -0800, deanbowlus@sbcglobal.net
(meandeanmachine) wrote:

>"Sanbar" <sanbar@wi.rr.com> wrote in message news:<srSjd.35998$ye4.24992@twister.rdc-kc.rr.com>...
>> I'd like to record drums using only 4 relatively inexpensive microphones.
>> Probably one on the kick, one on the snare and two overhead.
>>
>> Any recommendations on inexpensive mics to do the job and/or alternative
>> micing setup.
>>
>> Thanks as always
>
>I think that would work just fine. I would try to get the kick and the
>snare very isolated by wrapping foam in a conical shape or (some
>people claim car mats work good) around the mic and place them as
>close as you can to the kick and snare. The snare especially will pick
>up a lot of highhat unless you isolate it (you could gate it later
>also). Since you already have the mics I would disregard the advice of
>the audio snobs here wanting you to go out and spend another $400. You
>can do a hell of a lot more to get the tone you want with plug ins or
>mixer effects later.

....with, as always, the rider... listen carefully to the results.
Putting cones or anything else close in around a mic will certainly
change its response, often creating large peaks and troughs, and
destroying its polar pattern. If it produces the desired result, go
for it, but make sure you don't introduce some really annoying
artifacts that you only pick up much later during mixing when it's too
late.

Having said that, there is perhaps some scope to do this with minimum
risk if you use acoustic foam or fibreglass absorber material; the
effect will be somewhat less, but the risk much less.

On another related subject, I've heard of successes by creating a
tunnel in front of the kick (again, must be heavily damped) to improve
LF output by further delaying the LF wave from the beater side, so
it's less prone to canceling the LF wave from the front. If the kick
pedal doesn't make any noises, you can get almost as good an effect
(and less shell resonance artifacts) by micing the kick drum just
beside or above where the beater strikes; this method is particularly
useful if you want to apply lots of EQ later (not really recommended,
but some like it), as the signal is inherently cleaner.

Tony (remove the "_" to reply by email)
Anonymous
November 20, 2004 12:20:29 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

>
> ...with, as always, the rider... listen carefully to the results.
> Putting cones or anything else close in around a mic will certainly
> change its response, often creating large peaks and troughs, and
> destroying its polar pattern. If it produces the desired result, go
> for it, but make sure you don't introduce some really annoying
> artifacts that you only pick up much later during mixing when it's too
> late.
>

I have always used foam with pretty good results... even right against
the drum head with about a 4"-6" hollow space to the mic, i think the
guy who uses the car mats claims they are very absorbant so they don't
reflect a lot of sound (although Im sure they do somewhat). Good point
about the artifacts, even the natural annoying ones like a squeeking
pedal or bad spring tension against the snare can drive you batty.
Anonymous
November 20, 2004 3:06:09 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Wayne's set up would work great. I have used that exact set up.
Alternatives (and for less money): use the AT PRO25 (similar to the
ATM 25) on the kick. Also, try an MXL603s on the snare as a side mic.
You might not need the SM57 (although you can always find a use for
it). Buy an in-line pad for the snare 603s.

Those of you who have a 603s (or two, or three): try it on snare. You
might just love it.

ybstudios@aol.com (Wayne) wrote in message news:<20041108181138.21692.00000280@mb-m14.aol.com>...
> >I'd like to record drums using only 4 relatively inexpensive microphones.
> >Probably one on the kick, one on the snare and two overhead.
> >
> >Any recommendations on inexpensive mics to do the job and/or alternative
> >micing setup.
> >
> >Thanks as always
> >
>
> With those limited specifications, try the following:
>
> 1- Audio-Technica ATM25 for kick
> 2- Marshall MXL603s condensers for overheads
> 1- Shure SM57 for snare.
>
> That's about $450 not counting stands etc.
>
> --Wayne
>
> -"sounded good to me"-
!