Board tapes: how might I go digital?

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Hi,

For years my venue has been archiving performances ( we are
a cultural preservation and historical society) via a sequential
cassette recorder. We also have been providing musician tapes
by request. [ I have 4 cassette wells; two for the archive sequence,
and two reserved for musician tapes.]

We are (finally) looking to upgrade the system but I haven't
been able to find any digital solutions as simple as our current
"load tapes and push record" solution.

Our total show is about 4 hours, sets are about 30 min, and
setup is typically festival style/sound check on the fly.
I'd like to find a way to switch over to CD-R format for both
the archive and musician "tapes" with minimal extra work
for the sound booth. Are there any sequential CD recorders
out there (or other solutions) that might fit our needs? I'd like
to have a hard copy [CDs] at the end of the night without
the added step(s) of dumping a hard drive output to CD
or downloading to a computer (heck, the venue doesn't even
have a computer) etc.

Our music is acoustic (bluegrass, folk, country... ) mostly
close mic'd [or is that miked?] so I don't need to futz with
the tape mix. However we do plan do some multi-track
recordings for special events, like our song writers show.

I've done a little looking and all the solutions seem to be
more complex than cassette decks as well as cost an order
of magnitude more.

I'd like to bring an upgrade proposal to the board of directors
thus I'm open to suggestions...


Later...


Ron Capik
NJ Pinelands Cultural [and Historical] Society
< www.AlbertHall.org >
--
22 answers Last reply
More about board tapes digital
  1. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    Ron Capik <r.capik@worldnet.att.net> wrote:
    >
    >Our total show is about 4 hours, sets are about 30 min, and
    >setup is typically festival style/sound check on the fly.
    >I'd like to find a way to switch over to CD-R format for both
    >the archive and musician "tapes" with minimal extra work
    >for the sound booth. Are there any sequential CD recorders
    >out there (or other solutions) that might fit our needs? I'd like
    >to have a hard copy [CDs] at the end of the night without
    >the added step(s) of dumping a hard drive output to CD
    >or downloading to a computer (heck, the venue doesn't even
    >have a computer) etc.

    Microboards makes a standalone recorder with two transports that can swap
    in the middle of recording. A friend who tried it said that it was not ready
    for prime time but that the idea was a good one.
    --scott

    --
    "C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
  2. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    Ron Capik <r.capik@worldnet.att.net> wrote in message news:<41A4D463.1C45A22C@worldnet.att.net>...
    > Hi,
    >
    > For years my venue has been archiving performances ( we are
    > a cultural preservation and historical society) via a sequential
    > cassette recorder. We also have been providing musician tapes
    > by request. [ I have 4 cassette wells; two for the archive sequence,
    > and two reserved for musician tapes.]
    >
    > We are (finally) looking to upgrade the system but I haven't
    > been able to find any digital solutions as simple as our current
    > "load tapes and push record" solution.
    >
    > Our total show is about 4 hours, sets are about 30 min, and
    > setup is typically festival style/sound check on the fly.
    > I'd like to find a way to switch over to CD-R format for both
    > the archive and musician "tapes" with minimal extra work
    > for the sound booth. Are there any sequential CD recorders
    > out there (or other solutions) that might fit our needs? I'd like
    > to have a hard copy [CDs] at the end of the night without
    > the added step(s) of dumping a hard drive output to CD
    > or downloading to a computer (heck, the venue doesn't even
    > have a computer) etc.
    >
    > Our music is acoustic (bluegrass, folk, country... ) mostly
    > close mic'd [or is that miked?] so I don't need to futz with
    > the tape mix. However we do plan do some multi-track
    > recordings for special events, like our song writers show.
    >
    > I've done a little looking and all the solutions seem to be
    > more complex than cassette decks as well as cost an order
    > of magnitude more.
    >
    > I'd like to bring an upgrade proposal to the board of directors
    > thus I'm open to suggestions...
    >
    >
    > Later...
    >
    >
    > Ron Capik
    > NJ Pinelands Cultural [and Historical] Society
    > < www.AlbertHall.org >
    > --


    Why not just get 2 of the real time CDR recorders. Made by several
    companies. Lots of them have a loop through feed from the digital if
    you want to go out to the next one. Some have a sync feature for
    activation of recording to multiple machines. I know that the Marantz
    ones have this. The other companies are Tascam, HHB, Sony, Denon and
    suppose there are a few others.

    Mike http://www.mmeproductions.com
  3. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    Scott Dorsey wrote:

    > Ron Capik <r.capik@worldnet.att.net> wrote:
    > >
    > >Our total show is about 4 hours, sets are about 30 min, and
    > >setup is typically festival style/sound check on the fly.
    > < ...snip.. >
    >
    > Microboards makes a standalone recorder with two transports that can swap
    > in the middle of recording. A friend who tried it said that it was not ready
    > for prime time but that the idea was a good one.
    > --scott
    >
    > --
    > "C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."

    Hmm, sounds like the right direction but I don't think I'd
    want to jump on a not-ready-for-prime-time solution.
    [ ..but I'll take a look at it.]

    Any audio to DVD standalones out there? Should be
    able to fit a 4 hour stream on one of those...

    Later...

    Ron capik
    --
  4. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    I know you said you want to go direct to CD but I would not recomend this.It
    is much more reliable to go to a hard drive then dump to CD DVD or
    whatever.With recording directly to the media you risk your recording
    stopping due to bad media or glitches in the recording.CDs and DVDs are a
    great medium the problem is its not as reliable on the fly as good old
    analog tape.One glitch and you could lose your recording.

    I don't know of any recorders like you want on the market as most recorders
    record to hard drive first.The best thing to do would to invest in a small
    in expensive computer to record with and use it to chop up the audio and
    burn it at the end of the night.It really dosen't take that long to do this
    once you get the hang of it.

    Good Luck


    Ron Capik <r.capik@worldnet.att.net> wrote in message
    news:41A4D463.1C45A22C@worldnet.att.net...
    > Hi,
    >
    > For years my venue has been archiving performances ( we are
    > a cultural preservation and historical society) via a sequential
    > cassette recorder. We also have been providing musician tapes
    > by request. [ I have 4 cassette wells; two for the archive sequence,
    > and two reserved for musician tapes.]
    >
    > We are (finally) looking to upgrade the system but I haven't
    > been able to find any digital solutions as simple as our current
    > "load tapes and push record" solution.
    >
    > Our total show is about 4 hours, sets are about 30 min, and
    > setup is typically festival style/sound check on the fly.
    > I'd like to find a way to switch over to CD-R format for both
    > the archive and musician "tapes" with minimal extra work
    > for the sound booth. Are there any sequential CD recorders
    > out there (or other solutions) that might fit our needs? I'd like
    > to have a hard copy [CDs] at the end of the night without
    > the added step(s) of dumping a hard drive output to CD
    > or downloading to a computer (heck, the venue doesn't even
    > have a computer) etc.
    >
    > Our music is acoustic (bluegrass, folk, country... ) mostly
    > close mic'd [or is that miked?] so I don't need to futz with
    > the tape mix. However we do plan do some multi-track
    > recordings for special events, like our song writers show.
    >
    > I've done a little looking and all the solutions seem to be
    > more complex than cassette decks as well as cost an order
    > of magnitude more.
    >
    > I'd like to bring an upgrade proposal to the board of directors
    > thus I'm open to suggestions...
    >
    >
    > Later...
    >
    >
    > Ron Capik
    > NJ Pinelands Cultural [and Historical] Society
    > < www.AlbertHall.org >
    > --
    >
    >
  5. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    Alesis Masterlink <http://alesis.com/products/ml9600/>
  6. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    Troy wrote:

    > < ...snip.. >
    > analog tape.One glitch and you could lose your recording.
    >
    > I don't know of any recorders like you want on the market as most recorders
    > record to hard drive first.The best thing to do would to invest in a small
    > in expensive computer to record with and use it to chop up the audio and
    > < ...snip.. >
    > >

    Yes, points well taken. I'm looking at as many options as possible.

    For what it's worth, the venue is an "all volunteer" facility that has just
    celebrated 30 years of regular Saturday night shows. We just had that
    cited in the congressional record among other places. Seems there's
    a snowball's chance of changing that policy. I'm looking for solutions
    that don't require me to volunteer any more time than necessary.

    I have been thinking about the Mackie or Alesis hard disk multi-track
    units, but there doesn't seem to be any easy way to dump them to
    disk at the end of the night. Then too, I can record a lot of shows
    before I need to dump anything, and I'd have the option of multi-track
    for those "special show" recordings... might buy me the time to get
    a computer set up to dump to. But then ...I'd still need to deal with the
    musician CDs. Ahh, but the musician stuff need not be as robust as
    the archive.

    Just looking for as many options as possible at this time.

    Thanks.

    Later...

    Ron Capik
    --
  7. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    Ron in that case you may want to try one of the all in one digital porta
    studios like tascam make.Some of them have a built in burner option.Also it
    would give you multitrack capability if needed.
    I'm not up to date on models,but I do know they are quite affordable.
    This would probably be the easiest way for some one offs at the end of the
    night.

    Good Luck
    Troy


    Ron Capik <r.capik@worldnet.att.net> wrote in message
    news:41A536D0.7CC6C3A2@worldnet.att.net...
    > Troy wrote:
    >
    > > < ...snip.. >
    > > analog tape.One glitch and you could lose your recording.
    > >
    > > I don't know of any recorders like you want on the market as most
    recorders
    > > record to hard drive first.The best thing to do would to invest in a
    small
    > > in expensive computer to record with and use it to chop up the audio and
    > > < ...snip.. >
    > > >
    >
    > Yes, points well taken. I'm looking at as many options as possible.
    >
    > For what it's worth, the venue is an "all volunteer" facility that has
    just
    > celebrated 30 years of regular Saturday night shows. We just had that
    > cited in the congressional record among other places. Seems there's
    > a snowball's chance of changing that policy. I'm looking for solutions
    > that don't require me to volunteer any more time than necessary.
    >
    > I have been thinking about the Mackie or Alesis hard disk multi-track
    > units, but there doesn't seem to be any easy way to dump them to
    > disk at the end of the night. Then too, I can record a lot of shows
    > before I need to dump anything, and I'd have the option of multi-track
    > for those "special show" recordings... might buy me the time to get
    > a computer set up to dump to. But then ...I'd still need to deal with the
    > musician CDs. Ahh, but the musician stuff need not be as robust as
    > the archive.
    >
    > Just looking for as many options as possible at this time.
    >
    > Thanks.
    >
    > Later...
    >
    > Ron Capik
    > --
    >
    >
    >
  8. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    Troy wrote:

    > Ron in that case you may want to try one of the all in one digital porta
    > studios like tascam make.Some of them have a built in burner option.Also it
    > would give you multitrack capability if needed.
    > I'm not up to date on models,but I do know they are quite affordable.
    > This would probably be the easiest way for some one offs at the end of the
    > night.
    >
    > Good Luck
    > Troy

    I thought an option might be a hard drive ADAT clone and a porta-
    to dump to disk but I don't think any of the ADAT clones can dump
    to porta- disks easily... or maybe they do but I haven't found the
    right combination yet.

    I'm also thinking that the Mackie or Alesis boxes as standalones
    with simple opperating systems might be more robust than any
    Windoze box. [ ...or are you thinkin' Apple? ]

    This may end up being two seperate systems; an archiver and
    a musician dump.

    Still thinking.

    Later...

    Ron
    --
  9. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    What I ment was a hard disk recorder with built in mixer and CD burner.

    something like this

    http://www.tascam.com/Products/2488.html

    There are many versions of these by different companies.


    Ron Capik <r.capik@worldnet.att.net> wrote in message
    news:41A53D77.EA177C51@worldnet.att.net...
    > Troy wrote:
    >
    > > Ron in that case you may want to try one of the all in one digital porta
    > > studios like tascam make.Some of them have a built in burner option.Also
    it
    > > would give you multitrack capability if needed.
    > > I'm not up to date on models,but I do know they are quite affordable.
    > > This would probably be the easiest way for some one offs at the end of
    the
    > > night.
    > >
    > > Good Luck
    > > Troy
    >
    > I thought an option might be a hard drive ADAT clone and a porta-
    > to dump to disk but I don't think any of the ADAT clones can dump
    > to porta- disks easily... or maybe they do but I haven't found the
    > right combination yet.
    >
    > I'm also thinking that the Mackie or Alesis boxes as standalones
    > with simple opperating systems might be more robust than any
    > Windoze box. [ ...or are you thinkin' Apple? ]
    >
    > This may end up being two seperate systems; an archiver and
    > a musician dump.
    >
    > Still thinking.
    >
    > Later...
    >
    > Ron
    > --
    >
    >
  10. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    Troy wrote:

    > What I ment was a hard disk recorder with built in mixer and CD burner.
    >
    > something like this
    >
    > http://www.tascam.com/Products/2488.html
    >
    > There are many versions of these by different companies.
    > < ...snip.. >

    Yes, I understand. I currently have my sound booth filled by
    my sound board and don't have the desk space for another
    mixer or two let alone the hands to run another mixer. Thus
    I'm kind of looking for a rack or under the bench solution
    rather than a small porta-multi track. I'd also be spending
    bucks on a mixing I'd likely never use. Thus I keep looking
    at things like the HD-24 or HR-24; all recorder, no mixer cost.
    I believe the desk I have [Soundcraft MH-3, 40Ch... ] is a bit
    better than what I might get in any of the porta- recorders.
    ....but then any of these units would be a hell of a lot better
    than our old cassette tapes. ;-)

    Oh, and the musicians have grown to expect their cassettes
    to be available as soon as they finish their set. To make them
    wait for a dump at the end of the night would [IMHO] be a bit of
    a step backwards...

    [ Hope I'm not sounding pig headed with all these caveats. ]
    { Wonder what other requirements I've forgotten to mention.}

    Thanks.

    Still thinking.

    Later...

    Ron Capik
    --
  11. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    Ron Capik <r.capik@worldnet.att.net> wrote

    > We are (finally) looking to upgrade the system but I haven't
    > been able to find any digital solutions as simple as our current
    > "load tapes and push record" solution.
    >
    > Our total show is about 4 hours, sets are about 30 min, and
    > setup is typically festival style/sound check on the fly.
    > I'd like to find a way to switch over to CD-R format for both
    > the archive and musician "tapes" with minimal extra work
    > for the sound booth.

    Why not just record one set per CD on a stand-alone CD recorder (or
    two if you want to hand a disk to the musician after the show and keep
    one for the archive)? Blanks are cheap enough so you don't have to
    feel bad about letting half or more of it go to waste.

    It takes a minute or two, depending on the machine, to finalize the
    recording, so you might want to set the disks aside and finalize them
    after the show is over. That way you won't do what I do sometimes and
    forget to load in a new blank before the next set starts.


    --
    I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
    However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
    lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
    you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
    and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
  12. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    Hey thats kind of cool.....that might just be what he's looking for.


    Kurt Albershardt <kurt@nv.net> wrote in message
    news:30lfrmF30tr0hU1@uni-berlin.de...
    > Alesis Masterlink <http://alesis.com/products/ml9600/>
  13. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    http://www.samash.com/catalog/showitem.asp?SKU=YAW16GXXX

    There's a selection here. The Zoom comes in at 700 dollars.
  14. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    We've used DVDs recorders direct from a camera for simple one hour shows, so
    if it comes down to it, one would think changing DVDs is much easier than
    having some type of system that changes a direct stream video into mpeg 1 or
    whatever. However, if you are just doing audio there shouldn't be a problem
    and you'd be taking (16 bit/48 kHz) 172 Mb/s transfer rate so DVD should be
    fine for a few hours of recording audio. I wouldn't be afraid of doing it.
    Plus, with some systems, you can do an immediate record on one platter and
    then duplicate it right afterward. It would, at the least, replicate your 4
    cassette wells and do a better job.

    --


    Roger W. Norman
    SirMusic Studio

    "Ron Capik" <r.capik@worldnet.att.net> wrote in message
    news:41A4D946.23032604@worldnet.att.net...
    > Scott Dorsey wrote:
    >
    > > Ron Capik <r.capik@worldnet.att.net> wrote:
    > > >
    > > >Our total show is about 4 hours, sets are about 30 min, and
    > > >setup is typically festival style/sound check on the fly.
    > > < ...snip.. >
    > >
    > > Microboards makes a standalone recorder with two transports that can
    swap
    > > in the middle of recording. A friend who tried it said that it was not
    ready
    > > for prime time but that the idea was a good one.
    > > --scott
    > >
    > > --
    > > "C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
    >
    > Hmm, sounds like the right direction but I don't think I'd
    > want to jump on a not-ready-for-prime-time solution.
    > [ ..but I'll take a look at it.]
    >
    > Any audio to DVD standalones out there? Should be
    > able to fit a 4 hour stream on one of those...
    >
    > Later...
    >
    > Ron capik
    > --
    >
    >
  15. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    Ooops, 1.72 Mb/s or 172,000 kb/s. In other words, 10 MB per minute for
    stereo. 4.7 Gigs on DVD, and you've got LOTS of space. Not easily broken
    up for distribution, but it's doable.

    --


    Roger W. Norman
    SirMusic Studio

    "Roger W. Norman" <rnorman@starpower.net> wrote in message
    news:YK2dne74w86GjDrcRVn-3Q@rcn.net...
    > We've used DVDs recorders direct from a camera for simple one hour shows,
    so
    > if it comes down to it, one would think changing DVDs is much easier than
    > having some type of system that changes a direct stream video into mpeg 1
    or
    > whatever. However, if you are just doing audio there shouldn't be a
    problem
    > and you'd be taking (16 bit/48 kHz) 172 Mb/s transfer rate so DVD should
    be
    > fine for a few hours of recording audio. I wouldn't be afraid of doing
    it.
    > Plus, with some systems, you can do an immediate record on one platter and
    > then duplicate it right afterward. It would, at the least, replicate your
    4
    > cassette wells and do a better job.
    >
    > --
    >
    >
    > Roger W. Norman
    > SirMusic Studio
    >
    > "Ron Capik" <r.capik@worldnet.att.net> wrote in message
    > news:41A4D946.23032604@worldnet.att.net...
    > > Scott Dorsey wrote:
    > >
    > > > Ron Capik <r.capik@worldnet.att.net> wrote:
    > > > >
    > > > >Our total show is about 4 hours, sets are about 30 min, and
    > > > >setup is typically festival style/sound check on the fly.
    > > > < ...snip.. >
    > > >
    > > > Microboards makes a standalone recorder with two transports that can
    > swap
    > > > in the middle of recording. A friend who tried it said that it was
    not
    > ready
    > > > for prime time but that the idea was a good one.
    > > > --scott
    > > >
    > > > --
    > > > "C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
    > >
    > > Hmm, sounds like the right direction but I don't think I'd
    > > want to jump on a not-ready-for-prime-time solution.
    > > [ ..but I'll take a look at it.]
    > >
    > > Any audio to DVD standalones out there? Should be
    > > able to fit a 4 hour stream on one of those...
    > >
    > > Later...
    > >
    > > Ron capik
    > > --
    > >
    > >
    >
    >
  16. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    Still wrong on the values, but you get what I mean, I hope! <g> My fault.
    Shouldn't be writing this at 6:30 AM after Thanksgiving! <g>

    --


    Roger W. Norman
    SirMusic Studio

    "Roger W. Norman" <rnorman@starpower.net> wrote in message
    news:CridnRPTcJ9xjzrcRVn-gQ@rcn.net...
    > Ooops, 1.72 Mb/s or 172,000 kb/s. In other words, 10 MB per minute for
    > stereo. 4.7 Gigs on DVD, and you've got LOTS of space. Not easily broken
    > up for distribution, but it's doable.
    >
    > --
    >
    >
    > Roger W. Norman
    > SirMusic Studio
    >
    > "Roger W. Norman" <rnorman@starpower.net> wrote in message
    > news:YK2dne74w86GjDrcRVn-3Q@rcn.net...
    > > We've used DVDs recorders direct from a camera for simple one hour
    shows,
    > so
    > > if it comes down to it, one would think changing DVDs is much easier
    than
    > > having some type of system that changes a direct stream video into mpeg
    1
    > or
    > > whatever. However, if you are just doing audio there shouldn't be a
    > problem
    > > and you'd be taking (16 bit/48 kHz) 172 Mb/s transfer rate so DVD should
    > be
    > > fine for a few hours of recording audio. I wouldn't be afraid of doing
    > it.
    > > Plus, with some systems, you can do an immediate record on one platter
    and
    > > then duplicate it right afterward. It would, at the least, replicate
    your
    > 4
    > > cassette wells and do a better job.
    > >
    > > --
    > >
    > >
    > > Roger W. Norman
    > > SirMusic Studio
    > >
    > > "Ron Capik" <r.capik@worldnet.att.net> wrote in message
    > > news:41A4D946.23032604@worldnet.att.net...
    > > > Scott Dorsey wrote:
    > > >
    > > > > Ron Capik <r.capik@worldnet.att.net> wrote:
    > > > > >
    > > > > >Our total show is about 4 hours, sets are about 30 min, and
    > > > > >setup is typically festival style/sound check on the fly.
    > > > > < ...snip.. >
    > > > >
    > > > > Microboards makes a standalone recorder with two transports that can
    > > swap
    > > > > in the middle of recording. A friend who tried it said that it was
    > not
    > > ready
    > > > > for prime time but that the idea was a good one.
    > > > > --scott
    > > > >
    > > > > --
    > > > > "C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
    > > >
    > > > Hmm, sounds like the right direction but I don't think I'd
    > > > want to jump on a not-ready-for-prime-time solution.
    > > > [ ..but I'll take a look at it.]
    > > >
    > > > Any audio to DVD standalones out there? Should be
    > > > able to fit a 4 hour stream on one of those...
    > > >
    > > > Later...
    > > >
    > > > Ron capik
    > > > --
    > > >
    > > >
    > >
    > >
    >
    >
  17. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    "Roger W. Norman" wrote:

    > Still wrong on the values, but you get what I mean, I hope! <g> My fault.
    > Shouldn't be writing this at 6:30 AM after Thanksgiving! <g>
    >
    > --
    >
    > Roger W. Norman
    > SirMusic Studio
    >
    > "Roger W. Norman" <rnorman@starpower.net> wrote in message
    > news:CridnRPTcJ9xjzrcRVn-gQ@rcn.net...
    > > Ooops, 1.72 Mb/s or 172,000 kb/s. In other words, 10 MB per minute for
    > > stereo. 4.7 Gigs on DVD, and you've got LOTS of space. Not easily broken
    > > up for distribution, but it's doable.
    > >

    What the heck are you doing typing responses at ~6 AM the day after
    Thanksgiving?
    Up and out early for the big sales? <G>

    Yes, I get what you mean. I believe DVD might work well as an archive medium.
    I can see my needs as being two different tasks; archive, and musician sets.
    Thus DVDs on one (archive) machine and musician CDs on a basic CD machine.
    Do you have any pointers to DVD boxes that might fit my wish list needs?


    Thanks, ...now go get some coffee or something.

    Later...

    Ron Capik
    --
  18. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    Family left and I went to bed. I'm getting old because 9 PM is late on some
    nights! Then again, I was up and cooking at 6 AM. <g>

    As far as DVD recorders are concerned, probably not with your particular
    requirements. I mean, I've used them and for a FOH stereo recording they do
    fine, but I always run multitracks behind the scenes to mix when I get back
    to the studio. But what I've used as DVD recorders is basically an
    off-the-shelf recorder that I cram DVD-Rs into. I'm not saying I can't do a
    good live mix, but when it comes down to choice, most musicians prefer a
    multitrack mix over what's presented live. And it's cheap enough to do,
    other than time.

    --


    Roger W. Norman
    SirMusic Studio

    "Ron Capik" <r.capik@worldnet.att.net> wrote in message
    news:41A7431D.37505DE0@worldnet.att.net...
    > "Roger W. Norman" wrote:
    >
    > > Still wrong on the values, but you get what I mean, I hope! <g> My
    fault.
    > > Shouldn't be writing this at 6:30 AM after Thanksgiving! <g>
    > >
    > > --
    > >
    > > Roger W. Norman
    > > SirMusic Studio
    > >
    > > "Roger W. Norman" <rnorman@starpower.net> wrote in message
    > > news:CridnRPTcJ9xjzrcRVn-gQ@rcn.net...
    > > > Ooops, 1.72 Mb/s or 172,000 kb/s. In other words, 10 MB per minute
    for
    > > > stereo. 4.7 Gigs on DVD, and you've got LOTS of space. Not easily
    broken
    > > > up for distribution, but it's doable.
    > > >
    >
    > What the heck are you doing typing responses at ~6 AM the day after
    > Thanksgiving?
    > Up and out early for the big sales? <G>
    >
    > Yes, I get what you mean. I believe DVD might work well as an archive
    medium.
    > I can see my needs as being two different tasks; archive, and musician
    sets.
    > Thus DVDs on one (archive) machine and musician CDs on a basic CD machine.
    > Do you have any pointers to DVD boxes that might fit my wish list needs?
    >
    >
    > Thanks, ...now go get some coffee or something.
    >
    > Later...
    >
    > Ron Capik
    > --
    >
    >
  19. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    Mike Rivers wrote:

    > Ron Capik <r.capik@worldnet.att.net> wrote
    >
    > > We are (finally) looking to upgrade the system but I haven't
    > > been able to find any digital solutions as simple as our current
    > > "load tapes and push record" solution.
    > >
    > > < ...snip.. >
    >
    > Why not just record one set per CD on a stand-alone CD recorder (or
    > two if you want to hand a disk to the musician after the show and keep
    > one for the archive)? Blanks are cheap enough so you don't have to
    > feel bad about letting half or more of it go to waste.
    >
    > It takes a minute or two, depending on the machine, to finalize the
    > recording, so you might want to set the disks aside and finalize them
    > after the show is over. That way you won't do what I do sometimes and
    > forget to load in a new blank before the next set starts.

    > I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)

    --

    I'm starting to build up a nice list of potential solutions. Though I've
    burned
    many CDs on my computers I've never used a standalone CD burner and thus
    am not familiar with the start, stop, finalize procedure, but get the
    feeling it's
    similar to loading cassettes and pushing record.

    I do have next to zero time between sets. One act enters stage right as
    the other
    exits stage left. I get the final set list at the beginning of the night
    but never know
    how many people will be in the group 'till the wander on stage. :-{
    Try as I will, I can't seem to get the host/MC to check in the acts and
    communicate
    that information to me. Very much a down side of the casual atmosphere of
    our venue.
    ....but I digress.

    Thanks for the added input.

    Later....

    Ron Capik
    --
  20. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    Scott Dorsey wrote:

    > < ...snip.. >
    >
    > Microboards makes a standalone recorder with two transports that can swap
    > in the middle of recording. A friend who tried it said that it was not ready
    > for prime time but that the idea was a good one.
    > --scott
    > --
    > "C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."

    Hmmm, didn't see that unit on the Microboards page but I did see
    a Fostex multi-track hard drive box with a DVD burner option.

    maybe one of those and a standalone CD box for the musician's
    and I'd be set ...maybe.

    Gotta check on the Fostex details.

    Later...

    Ron Capik
    --
  21. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    > For years my venue has been archiving performances ( we are
    > a cultural preservation and historical society) via a sequential
    > cassette recorder. We also have been providing musician tapes
    > by request. [ I have 4 cassette wells; two for the archive sequence,
    > and two reserved for musician tapes.]
    >
    > We are (finally) looking to upgrade the system but I haven't
    > been able to find any digital solutions as simple as our current
    > "load tapes and push record" solution.
    >
    > Our total show is about 4 hours, sets are about 30 min, and
    > setup is typically festival style/sound check on the fly.
    > I'd like to find a way to switch over to CD-R format for both
    > the archive and musician "tapes" with minimal extra work
    > for the sound booth. Are there any sequential CD recorders
    > out there (or other solutions) that might fit our needs? I'd like
    > to have a hard copy [CDs] at the end of the night without
    > the added step(s) of dumping a hard drive output to CD
    > or downloading to a computer (heck, the venue doesn't even
    > have a computer) etc.

    A $200 Nomad Jukebox 3 is worth considering. It's the size of a discman and
    records to a 20GB hard drive with DAT sound quality and has proven to be
    very reliable. The stock drive holds 33 hours of 16/44.1 audio, but can be
    swapped out for any 2.5" laptop drive, currently 80GB drives are available,
    in time 120GB will eventually be available. The recordings are transfered
    to a PC over Firewire at 32x (5MB/s), so one of your 4 hour shows takes
    about 10 minutes to transfer, then you can easily process the audio onto
    CD's and DVD archives. The resulting files are even time-stamped for easy
    organization.
  22. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    >
    >I'm starting to build up a nice list of potential solutions. Though I've
    >burned
    >many CDs on my computers I've never used a standalone CD burner and thus
    >am not familiar with the start, stop, finalize procedure, but get the
    >feeling it's
    >similar to loading cassettes and pushing record.
    >
    >I do have next to zero time between sets. One act enters stage right as
    >the other
    >exits stage left. I get the final set list at the beginning of the night
    >but never know
    >how many people will be in the group 'till the wander on stage. :-{
    >Try as I will, I can't seem to get the host/MC to check in the acts and
    >communicate
    >that information to me. Very much a down side of the casual atmosphere of
    >our venue.
    >...but I digress.
    >
    >Thanks for the added input.
    >
    >Later....
    >
    >Ron Capik
    >--

    The standalone CDR recorders are not quite as simple or fast as a cassette
    deck.

    First, on my HHB 830, (and I am pretty sure that this is typical) it takes 18
    seconds for the machine to recognize a new disc.

    Second, it takes at least another 10-12 seconds for the machine to setup for
    recording the disc.

    When finished recording, you could set up the machine for self finalizing
    (about 4-1/2 minutes) or manually finalize the disc, which the machine says
    will take 2 minutes, but in reality is at least three minutes unless it decides
    to hang during finalizing, in which case, it may be a little longer.

    My solution would be to use two machines and rotate them, having one always
    recording.

    I use a single HHB 830 for documentation of high school bands at our festival
    days at the University, but I have a fair amount of time between bands.

    CDR recorders, unlike DAT machines and Hard Drive recorders are extremely
    sensitive to physical shock. Mount them solidly and there is no problem, but
    one bump will kill a disc. For this reason, plus the longer recording time, I
    use a DAT on concert recording.
    Richard H. Kuschel
    "I canna change the law of physics."-----Scotty
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