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Losing internet with static IP

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December 29, 2012 4:15:40 PM

Sorry if this is something silly I'm missing. I'm trying to set the various computers in my house to static IPs. When I do, the apprear to still be connected to the home network but lose internet connection. I'm using a Medialink wireless router, but I'm trying to set the hard wired lan connections, not anything wireless.
I go under ipv4, set:
ip address: 192-168.0.100 (or 101, whatever)
submask fills in to 255.255.255.0
Default Gateway: 192.168.0.1

I also went into the router setting and change (dchp?) to only automatically assign from 192.168.0.120 and up so nothing conflicted.

Any suggestions what I'm doing wrong?

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December 29, 2012 5:40:44 PM

And in the router you assigned that static address in the static address table for each PC?
December 31, 2012 5:13:26 PM

Sorry for the late reply, holidays and I wanted to recheck everything. Yes, in DHCP List&Binding I added 192.168.0.100 to the mac address of the machine. It still assigns it a random one in the list below it on that screen. So it's added to the static IP address, but is still assigning it a different one.
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December 31, 2012 7:05:51 PM

Since you have properly set up both the computer with a static address and then entered that computer IP address with its MAC address in the router, it should work fine.

I don't know Medialink well enough to know if it really sets static addresses or if they are truly reserved dynamic addresses -- if that is the case, and a quick experiment will tell you, simply leave all settings as they are except return the DHCP range to 100 to 200 from 120 to 200. Thus, the "static" addresses you used will be in the DHCP range, which is normally wrong, but if they are actually reserved dynamic addresses it would be correct. From the pretty sparse manual it looks like that could actually be the issue. So try that.

If that fails, I would just assume something is not working correctly in the router, and I would just use dynamically assigned addresses and give up on the static setup.
December 31, 2012 10:07:14 PM

I believe you are confused about what you have done.
You think you have reserved 4 addresses for wired computers and then changed the DHCP addresses to not cover those reserved IP's
which woudl make sense.
However, what you have actually done is cause a conflict saying I want 4 computers to have these IP's and then I do not want these IP's to be part of my network, which makes no sense.

Leave them reserved, and then set the DHCP server to still assign them so that it can.
This should solve the issue.
December 31, 2012 11:16:09 PM

lucasbuck2 said:
Sorry if this is something silly I'm missing. I'm trying to set the various computers in my house to static IPs. When I do, the apprear to still be connected to the home network but lose internet connection. I'm using a Medialink wireless router, but I'm trying to set the hard wired lan connections, not anything wireless.
I go under ipv4, set:
ip address: 192-168.0.100 (or 101, whatever)
submask fills in to 255.255.255.0
Default Gateway: 192.168.0.1

I also went into the router setting and change (dchp?) to only automatically assign from 192.168.0.120 and up so nothing conflicted.

Any suggestions what I'm doing wrong?


Did you also specify one or more DNS servers?

When hard coding your addresses you must include everything that would be assigned by DHCP.
December 31, 2012 11:59:29 PM

wacabletech said:
I believe you are confused about what you have done.
You think you have reserved 4 addresses for wired computers and then changed the DHCP addresses to not cover those reserved IP's
which woudl make sense.
However, what you have actually done is cause a conflict saying I want 4 computers to have these IP's and then I do not want these IP's to be part of my network, which makes no sense.

Leave them reserved, and then set the DHCP server to still assign them so that it can.
This should solve the issue.
While I agree with your conclusion that these are actually reserved dynamic addresses, if you look at the manual it is very poorly written and makes it almost appear that you are creating static addresses.

Static addresses should be outside of the assignable DHCP range on every other router that I've ever used, so his mistake is totally understandable. These simply are not true static addresses, but rather reserved dynamic and as such they must be within the assignable DHCP range.
January 1, 2013 3:56:03 AM

156917,7,718531 said:
While I agree with your conclusion that these are actually reserved dynamic addresses, if you look at the manual it is very poorly written and makes it almost appear that you are creating static addresses. [/quote,sg]


While I may be wrong, first to admit that, most home routers I have seen cannot support both static and dynamic the way business
class routers sometimes can. But rather have a you go static and make everything a static IP or you stay dhcp and reserve some ip's
by mac address and we'll always assign that IP to that device.

Yeah I looked at that manual, for about 3 seconds and was like we'll lets just assume its like every cheapo home router I have ever dealt with
from netgear/dlink/belkin/etc.. Because if that was a high class router they sure didn't make a high class manual. Didn't even have pictures of
he UI layout for pete sake.
January 1, 2013 1:08:03 PM

My experience has been far more positive with a number of consumer routers, other than with the number of radio connections that they can handle, which seems to be 8-9 on a good day.

Just as an example, since I have used many of them and have 4 at home (1 as a router and 3 as APs), the D-Link DIR-655 allows both reserved dynamic addressing and static addressing along with the usual dynamic addresses. So if you ever need a good $60 single band N gigabit router take a quick look at one.

Also, those that can handle a dd-wrt firmware flash have exception capabilities for what are sometimes $25 wireless routers.

No question that the Medialink is not in that class, including its "manual." :) 
!