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Best settings on Sound Forge 7.0 to remaster music?

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Anonymous
November 25, 2004 6:05:11 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

I use Sound Forge 7.0 to clean up audio on vinyl and cds. I was just
wondering what settings are recommended to get the best sound with the
highest clarity.
Anonymous
November 26, 2004 2:58:51 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Jeff Mills wrote:
> I use Sound Forge 7.0 to clean up audio on vinyl and cds. I was just
> wondering what settings are recommended to get the best sound with the
> highest clarity.

* I would recommend doing the processing all in 32 Bit floating-point.
You can dither and reduce the bitrate as the final step.

* If there is a knob for the quality (as in the graphic EQ), always use
best quality.

* Be prepared to keep some noise if more noise reduction sounds unnatural.

Johann
--
Geh, und sauf die Güllegrube auf, Du erbärmlicher Wicht,
und heul hier° nicht rum.
("Unternehmensberater" Klaus "Diego Alfredo Unada" Ketelaer in
<ca4sf0$22b$00$1@news.t-online.com>)
Anonymous
November 26, 2004 6:50:08 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

It has been a while since I used SoundForge. I think I had version
4.5 when I stopped using it.

I started out using the "Graphic Dynamics" module set as a limiter
then ran the "Normalize" function to get it as hot as possible (about
-0.01 dbfs).

I don't know about 7.0, but in the version I had, there was a "Scan"
button in the Normalize window that would give you the peak and RMS
levels. I found it was better to run the Scan function, note the peak
level, cancel the Normalize window, then use the "Volume" window to
bring the Peak level up to -0.01 dbfs or so. I don't know why this
method sounded better than Normalizing but several people have agreed
in listening tests.

Also, another cool thing you can do with any DAW is the following EQ
trick:

First, determine the EQ settings you want to use. For example, say the
track needs some bottom and you want to add +6 db @ 125 Hz.

Apply a +3db boost @ 125 Hz. Invert the track (so it plays backwards).
Then apply another +3db boost @ 125 Hz. Invert the track again and
have a listen. You should be hearing almost transparent EQ. You have
your +6 db boost @ 125 Hz, but you have canceled the phase anomolies
caused by EQ's.

Good Luck.

Bulldog


beatlejuice350@comcast.net (Jeff Mills) wrote in message news:<5a18308c.0411251505.e6903bf@posting.google.com>...
> I use Sound Forge 7.0 to clean up audio on vinyl and cds. I was just
> wondering what settings are recommended to get the best sound with the
> highest clarity.
Related resources
Anonymous
November 27, 2004 2:33:42 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

> I use Sound Forge 7.0 to clean up audio on vinyl and cds. I was just
> wondering what settings are recommended to get the best sound with the
> highest clarity.

The Sonic Foundry noise reduction plug is quite good, pressumably the same
dsp code as Digidesign's BNR. Never use it for more than -7dB reduction, if
you need more you can use it twice, works much better than doing -14dB in
one pass.

Often older recordings can benefit from some compression, especially if your
usual listening environment is noisy. To keep things simple, T-Racks is a
great sounding program with analog-like controls, and if you're ambitious a
multiband compressor offers more precision, but with a considerable learning
curve. With T-Racks you can simply play with the knobs and adjust to taste
quite harmlessly, but a multiband compressor is probably doing more harm
than good if you're getting results that are substantially different from
T-Racks, and is only recommended if the original recording is flawed and you
really know what you're doing.

Unfortunately T-Racks plug-ins don't play nice with Sound Forge, but the
stand-alone version works well. The problem there is that there's no batch
processing for CD tracks...
Anonymous
November 27, 2004 9:54:20 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Sugarite" <nobody@home.com> wrote in message news:<YX1qd.16381$14.7453@read1.cgocable.net>...
> > I use Sound Forge 7.0 to clean up audio on vinyl and cds. I was just
> > wondering what settings are recommended to get the best sound with the
> > highest clarity.
>
> The Sonic Foundry noise reduction plug is quite good, pressumably the same
> dsp code as Digidesign's BNR. Never use it for more than -7dB reduction, if
> you need more you can use it twice, works much better than doing -14dB in
> one pass.
>
> Often older recordings can benefit from some compression, especially if your
> usual listening environment is noisy. To keep things simple, T-Racks is a
> great sounding program with analog-like controls, and if you're ambitious a
> multiband compressor offers more precision, but with a considerable learning
> curve. With T-Racks you can simply play with the knobs and adjust to taste
> quite harmlessly, but a multiband compressor is probably doing more harm
> than good if you're getting results that are substantially different from
> T-Racks, and is only recommended if the original recording is flawed and you
> really know what you're doing.
>
> Unfortunately T-Racks plug-ins don't play nice with Sound Forge, but the
> stand-alone version works well. The problem there is that there's no batch
> processing for CD tracks...

Okay, here are the current settings I use on Sound Forge 7.0:

First thing I do is select "Normalize" RMS to -6 dB, Average RMS power,
use equal loudness contour, with Attack time and Release time at 200. Then
I convert to 24-bit using High Pass Triangular and High Pass Contour for
Dither and Noise Shaping. For EQ I select the Parametric envelope using
High frequency shelf for Filter style. For Accuracy I select High. Cutoff
frequency is 6,000 Hz and Transition width is 0.5

For Smooth/Enhance I move the taskbar to +3 on the side of Enhance. Then I
select Noise Gate with Attack time of 1 and Release time of 5,000 Threshold
level is set at -40 dB Finally I select "Dynamics" and check Auto gain
compensate and Sync stereo gain. Attack time is set at 1.0 and Release is
set at 5,000.0 Output gain is set at 0.0 dB

Any other recommendations? BTW thanks to all who responded.
Anonymous
November 28, 2004 2:56:25 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

david@bosserman.net (bulldog) wrote in message news:<4cfe2c23.0411261550.39748be6@posting.google.com>...
> It has been a while since I used SoundForge. I think I had version
> 4.5 when I stopped using it.
>
> I started out using the "Graphic Dynamics" module set as a limiter
> then ran the "Normalize" function to get it as hot as possible (about
> -0.01 dbfs).
>
> I don't know about 7.0, but in the version I had, there was a "Scan"
> button in the Normalize window that would give you the peak and RMS
> levels. I found it was better to run the Scan function, note the peak
> level, cancel the Normalize window, then use the "Volume" window to
> bring the Peak level up to -0.01 dbfs or so. I don't know why this
> method sounded better than Normalizing but several people have agreed
> in listening tests.
>
> Also, another cool thing you can do with any DAW is the following EQ
> trick:
>
> First, determine the EQ settings you want to use. For example, say the
> track needs some bottom and you want to add +6 db @ 125 Hz.
>
> Apply a +3db boost @ 125 Hz. Invert the track (so it plays backwards).
> Then apply another +3db boost @ 125 Hz. Invert the track again and
> have a listen. You should be hearing almost transparent EQ. You have
> your +6 db boost @ 125 Hz, but you have canceled the phase anomolies
> caused by EQ's.
>
> Good Luck.
>
> Bulldog

Bulldog, I just wanted to say that I took your advice and my cds sounded
awesome. I've never heard them sound as good as they did. Thanks to you
and everyone else who responded. You guys rock!
Anonymous
November 28, 2004 5:00:03 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Jeff Mills wrote:
> First thing I do is select "Normalize" RMS to -6 dB, Average RMS power,
> use equal loudness contour, with Attack time and Release time at 200. Then

Don't use normalization. You can apply some compression as one of the
final steps.

> I convert to 24-bit using High Pass Triangular and High Pass Contour for
> Dither and Noise Shaping.

From what I know you don't need to apply dither when setting the
bitdepth up.

Johann
--
Sie sind doch nicht ganz richtig unterm Pony, wenn sie Nazisprech auch
noch mit Usenetjargon gleichsetzen moechten. Einfach nur zu verachten.
(*Tönnes in <ai64rv$47d$1@newsreader2.netcologne.de>)
Anonymous
November 28, 2004 6:58:34 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Whenever I play the cds I burn from Sound Forge 7.0 in the car, it
takes almost a minute for the cd to start playing the first track.
Yet other cds in my car play right away. Why is that?
Anonymous
November 29, 2004 4:05:43 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

>Whenever I play the cds I burn from Sound Forge 7.0 in the car, it
>takes almost a minute for the cd to start playing the first track.
>Yet other cds in my car play right away. Why is that?

Are your other CDs also burned on the computer? Maybe its a pressed CD versus
CDR thing in your car's player.

Just a thought,
-lee-
November 29, 2004 6:13:13 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <0001HW.BDCFF59E000CD4A6F05095B0@news.supernews.com>, Marc
Wielage <mfw@musictrax.com> wrote:

> About a year ago, Digi privately admitted that DINR was on the way out, and
> they did a big promotion allowing DINR users to purchase Sonic Solutions'
> NoNoise plug-ins for half price. NoNoise is much more difficult to use than
> DINR, but I find it much more effective, particularly for hiss reduction.
>
> --MFW



Ya, what was it, a grand instead of the usual two grand?

What else does NoNoise do well besides hiss reduction?

How does it compare to what the Waves Restoration bundle does?

What is the best Mac software for getting rid of record tics and pops?



David Correia
Celebration Sound
Warren, Rhode Island

David@CelebrationSound.com
www.CelebrationSound.com
Anonymous
November 29, 2004 6:13:14 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

david <ihate@spamo.com> wrote:
>Ya, what was it, a grand instead of the usual two grand?
>
>What else does NoNoise do well besides hiss reduction?

The decrackling is pretty good, but I think the Cedar decrackling is
better. The NoNoise broadband reduction beats the Cedar a little, I
think.

>How does it compare to what the Waves Restoration bundle does?

I dunno.

>What is the best Mac software for getting rid of record tics and pops?

Any editing. It is MUCH easier to just edit them out by hand than to
deal with any of the pop removal systems. Decrackling is much better done
in software, but single transient clicks and pops are still better done
by ear and hand, I think.
--scott
--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
February 16, 2011 6:49:32 AM

Although I haven't tried many of the applications to digitize vinyl records and cassettes I have been most impressed with SoundSaver by BIAS-Inc. Their website is http://www.bias-inc.com/products/soundSaver/ and there is a YouTube video that highlights the program's operation. I have seen no other utility or application that comes close to doing what this one does. It even compensates for 78 RPM Records and allows you to play them at 33 or 45 RPM and the software does perfect conversion so that it plays right. Tagging information can be done automatically for commercial products or commercially recorded albums or cassettes.

I'd love to hear from someone that owns this software but from initial reactions it won't be long before I do.
!