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HiMD update

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Anonymous
November 27, 2004 2:56:01 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

I've been pestering SONY tech support for a few weeks to find out why
pcm recordings I make on my HiMD unit vanish after I transfer them (via
USB) to my PC. Never did get a satisfactory answer from them, but a
contributor to the alt.audio.minidisc NG solved the problem. There's a
checkbox in the Transfer dialog that instructs SonicStage to leave the
original recordings on the MD alone. It works. I had had good luck
transferring pcm recordings and then converting them with SONY's Wave
Convertor program, but was miffed that SonicStage was deleting them
after the transfer. That's no longer an issue.

So, I'm pleased. I have recorded my wife's vocal group with the HiMD
unit by connecting it to the mixer. It's only two tracks, and not
stereo, since I'm recording the PA feed, but the quality is adequate for
our purposes. I recorded some silence--mixer gain all the way down--to
see how much noise was sneaking through (or getting generated by the
HiMD MZ-NH900). Sound Forge reports that it's below -70dB in the
converted .wav file. Listening with phones with the gain WAY up doesn't
disclose anything objectionable - no digital rattles, hum, etc.

Jason

More about : himd update

Anonymous
November 27, 2004 11:04:04 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <MPG.1c0db857883b253d9897f3@news.verizon.net> cipher@sitefinder.verisign.com writes:

> There's a
> checkbox in the Transfer dialog that instructs SonicStage to leave the
> original recordings on the MD alone. It works. I had had good luck
> transferring pcm recordings and then converting them with SONY's Wave
> Convertor program

So how does this work? The HiMD records a PCM file that's something
other than a WAV format, you transfer this to your PC, and then run
another program to convert it to WAV? Or does the SonicStage program
convert it in the transfer process?

It seems rather silly for deleting the file on the Minidisk after a
transfer to be the default. After all, the only reason to use a
recorder with removable/cheap-enough-to-store media over something
that records to a hard drive or flash card is that you can put the
disk on the shelf and load its files some time in the future. But if
there's a non-standard or proprietary format recorded on the disk, I
wouldn't count on it being a very effective shelf copy. Might as well
delete it so you're not tempted to store it for posterity.



--
I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
Anonymous
November 27, 2004 9:42:00 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On 27 Nov 2004 08:04:04 -0500, mrivers@d-and-d.com (Mike Rivers)
wrote:
------------8<----------------------
>
>So how does this work? The HiMD records a PCM file that's something
>other than a WAV format, you transfer this to your PC, and then run
>another program to convert it to WAV? Or does the SonicStage program
>convert it in the transfer process?
HiMD records PCM in a file with the proprietary extension "*.oma". Up
to recently, Sonic Stage hasn't even been capable of transferring it
to any other usable format; it merely offered listening to a
transferred recording with its own player. It's a totally useless
approach. Oh yes, it offered burning a "ATRAC-CD" (???), the kind of
CD writing I don't bother to think about and I don't frankly know
where I could listen to such Atrac CD's. I hastened to get the burner
application off from the Windows startup. But soon a good soul has
made a free downloadable convertor program which is converting the
"*.omg" to *.wav format. Upon a public demand, and following some sane
logics, and probably seeing that out there there is something they
call the I-Pod, Sony published their own OMA-to-WAW converter which
works well. You can access the attached a Sony HiMD (with either a 1
GB HiMD disk or a normal Minidisc formatted to abt 360 MB) as the file
structure is FAT32. But you can't do much with the audio file formats.
>It seems rather silly for deleting the file on the Minidisk after a
>transfer to be the default. After all, the only reason to use a
>recorder with removable/cheap-enough-to-store media over something
>that records to a hard drive or flash card is that you can put the
>disk on the shelf and load its files some time in the future. But if
>there's a non-standard or proprietary format recorded on the disk, I
>wouldn't count on it being a very effective shelf copy. Might as well
>delete it so you're not tempted to store it for posterity.
I've rarely seen more paranoic approach as to copy protecting other
than Sonic Stage. You can only from within the program transfer the
files via USB 1.1. They call it High Speed but I call it Somewhat
Higher Speed. Nevertheless, a transfer is digital w/o further
conversions and that's good enough. For a 1 hr. 25. min 44/16 file you
need abt. an hour to transfer. There are some other limitations as to
what kind of files and from what sources one can upload/download the
music but I'm satisfied that I can do own uncompressed PCM recordings
so I didn't study in detail what I can do and what I can't.
The program is so weird that it calls a Sony database via Internet not
only at the first install but also later, as it seems fit (perhaps
after defragmeting, a work with the registry or so). It refuses to
load until the Internet connection is established and it checks its
status in the database.

It offers to you some music to buy from the Internet (why should I),
as well.

I think Sony could make some more money to make things easier to eg.
broadcast people which could handle makeshift but quite quality
recordings on the spot and transfer it for broadcast by drag and drop.
But, naay... "It's a Sony".

From the techincal/hardware side, the MZ-NH1 is a little gem, though.

Edi Zubovic, Crikvenica, Croatia
Related resources
Anonymous
November 27, 2004 9:48:27 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <eadhq0l0vherile43ukpg5ii5mc398cnvb@4ax.com> this].@ri.htnet.hr writes:

> I've rarely seen more paranoic approach as to copy protecting other
> than Sonic Stage. You can only from within the program transfer the
> files via USB 1.1.

Well, the original Sony NetMD would certainly qualify. That was the
system that wouldn't let you transfer a file out of the USB port at
all unless it go on the Minidisk from the computer. In other words, no
file transfers of original recordings.

> For a 1 hr. 25. min 44/16 file you
> need abt. an hour to transfer.

Sounds like a project for when you're around doing something else. On
the Jukebox 3, a USB 1.1 transfer of an hour's worth of recording
takes about 15 minutes, give or take a cup of coffee. I understand
that Firewire is much faster, but I don't have a computer with a
Firewire port so I haven't experienced it.

> The program is so weird that it calls a Sony database via Internet not
> only at the first install but also later, as it seems fit (perhaps
> after defragmeting, a work with the registry or so). It refuses to
> load until the Internet connection is established and it checks its
> status in the database.

Well, I guess that makes it useless in a field application unless you
happen to have a phone line or a wireless Internet connection. So is
there any advantage of the HiMD over some other media (other than
perhaps that it sounds better than a cassette)? Curious minds want to
know what Sony was thinking of, and why some perfectly respectable
people were waiting for this technology with baited breath.


--
I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
November 27, 2004 10:47:13 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

J Warren <nobody@invalid.urp> wrote in message news:<MPG.1c0db857883b253d9897f3@news.verizon.net>...
> I've been pestering SONY tech support for a few weeks to find out why
> pcm recordings I make on my HiMD unit vanish after I transfer them (via
> USB) to my PC. Never did get a satisfactory answer from them, but a
> contributor to the alt.audio.minidisc NG solved the problem. There's a
> checkbox in the Transfer dialog that instructs SonicStage to leave the
> original recordings on the MD alone. It works. I had had good luck
> transferring pcm recordings and then converting them with SONY's Wave
> Convertor program, but was miffed that SonicStage was deleting them
> after the transfer. That's no longer an issue.
>
> So, I'm pleased. I have recorded my wife's vocal group with the HiMD
> unit by connecting it to the mixer. It's only two tracks, and not
> stereo, since I'm recording the PA feed, but the quality is adequate for
> our purposes. I recorded some silence--mixer gain all the way down--to
> see how much noise was sneaking through (or getting generated by the
> HiMD MZ-NH900). Sound Forge reports that it's below -70dB in the
> converted .wav file. Listening with phones with the gain WAY up doesn't
> disclose anything objectionable - no digital rattles, hum, etc.
>
> Jason


Have you compared the ATRAC mode to the PCM mode?

Can you hear a difference?

Really?

Mark
Anonymous
November 28, 2004 1:23:00 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On 27 Nov 2004 18:48:27 -0500, mrivers@d-and-d.com (Mike Rivers)
wrote:

>
>In article <eadhq0l0vherile43ukpg5ii5mc398cnvb@4ax.com> this].@ri.htnet.hr writes:
>
>> I've rarely seen more paranoic approach as to copy protecting other
>> than Sonic Stage. You can only from within the program transfer the
>> files via USB 1.1.
>
>Well, the original Sony NetMD would certainly qualify. That was the
>system that wouldn't let you transfer a file out of the USB port at
>all unless it go on the Minidisk from the computer. In other words, no
>file transfers of original recordings.

{Sigh}. Even RIAA would say that's too much.
>
>> For a 1 hr. 25. min 44/16 file you
>> need abt. an hour to transfer.
>
>Sounds like a project for when you're around doing something else. On
>the Jukebox 3, a USB 1.1 transfer of an hour's worth of recording
>takes about 15 minutes, give or take a cup of coffee. I understand
>that Firewire is much faster, but I don't have a computer with a
>Firewire port so I haven't experienced it.

First I've seen that the transfer is USB 1.1 I thought what the heck,
it should be the USB 2. But soon I realized there's no need for a
higher bandwidth when I saw the device softly rattling a little, then
flashing the red LED a little as the buffers fill and empty. Oh, well.
I can't afford a Nagra V and yes, there are other solutions already
present competing to the HiMD as to portability. As to Firewire, it
may be as broad as the USB 2 or thereabouts. I have a Plextor external
DVD burner connected via Firewire and it's working well at all
situations, not limited by the maximum data amount the Plextor can
give and receive. But consider a diskette drive connected to the USB,
that' s I think roughly the HiMD. Not much kb per sec -- until and if
I find out that I've done something not quite properly in connecting
the device, what I doubt but OK...
>
>> The program is so weird that it calls a Sony database via Internet not
>> only at the first install but also later, as it seems fit (perhaps
>> after defragmeting, a work with the registry or so). It refuses to
>> load until the Internet connection is established and it checks its
>> status in the database.
>
>Well, I guess that makes it useless in a field application unless you
>happen to have a phone line or a wireless Internet connection. So is
>there any advantage of the HiMD over some other media (other than
>perhaps that it sounds better than a cassette)? Curious minds want to
>know what Sony was thinking of, and why some perfectly respectable
>people were waiting for this technology with baited breath.

Well, let me speculate -- now when Sony has acquired quite huge and
known names in entertainment industry, they think they should control
the world's distribution. C'mon Sony. The situation is not at all that
black to force you to hamper your customers this way. I think that
Sony tries by all means to limit copying of PCM data which are
regarded as being the 1:1 copy of masters or commercial CDs. ATRAC is
allowed to handle with a little bit more freely as it is compressed
and changes the sound -- a little but it does. I see the HiMD as a
poor man's portable hard disk recorder giving quite fine results (it
seems the electronics and A/D converters are OK; it all is new and I
think that Sony had rarely issues concerning their hardware
engineering and R&D). So I would have been happy to get a still
another external unit to show in the, say Windows Explorer, where I
could see, and handle with, the wav files -- and other data -- I
downloaded or uploaded, no matter; and OK, notwhitstanding the slow
transfer speeds. That I can copy everything regardless and usual copy
protection and copyrights depends on my ethics firstly. And then there
is the law. Sony's own control isn't that needed to set me back in
doing my own recordings. And I would register with Sony as a customer
if I want to and no, I don't want my PC to be sniffed without my
knowledge and yes by jingo I want to have my paid software functioning
as I expect in all situations and everywhere. And I certainly don't
expect to be [____ you fill] off because I don't have an Internet
connection handy.


Edi Zubovic, Crikvenica, Croatia
Anonymous
November 28, 2004 4:11:36 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On Sat, 27 Nov 2004 18:42:00 +0100, Edi Zubovic <edi.zubovic[rem
this].@ri.htnet.hr> wrote:

>On 27 Nov 2004 08:04:04 -0500, mrivers@d-and-d.com (Mike Rivers)
>wrote:
>------------8<----------------------
>>
>>So how does this work? The HiMD records a PCM file that's something
>>other than a WAV format, you transfer this to your PC, and then run
>>another program to convert it to WAV? Or does the SonicStage program
>>convert it in the transfer process?
>HiMD records PCM in a file with the proprietary extension "*.oma". Up
>to recently, Sonic Stage hasn't even been capable of transferring it
>to any other usable format; it merely offered listening to a
>transferred recording with its own player. It's a totally useless
>approach. Oh yes, it offered burning a "ATRAC-CD" (???), the kind of
>CD writing I don't bother to think about and I don't frankly know
>where I could listen to such Atrac CD's. I hastened to get the burner
>application off from the Windows startup. But soon a good soul has
>made a free downloadable convertor program which is converting the
>"*.omg" to *.wav format. Upon a public demand, and following some sane
>logics, and probably seeing that out there there is something they
>call the I-Pod, Sony published their own OMA-to-WAW converter which
>works well. You can access the attached a Sony HiMD (with either a 1
>GB HiMD disk or a normal Minidisc formatted to abt 360 MB) as the file
>structure is FAT32. But you can't do much with the audio file formats.
>>It seems rather silly for deleting the file on the Minidisk after a
>>transfer to be the default. After all, the only reason to use a
>>recorder with removable/cheap-enough-to-store media over something
>>that records to a hard drive or flash card is that you can put the
>>disk on the shelf and load its files some time in the future. But if
>>there's a non-standard or proprietary format recorded on the disk, I
>>wouldn't count on it being a very effective shelf copy. Might as well
>>delete it so you're not tempted to store it for posterity.
>I've rarely seen more paranoic approach as to copy protecting other
>than Sonic Stage. You can only from within the program transfer the
>files via USB 1.1. They call it High Speed but I call it Somewhat
>Higher Speed. Nevertheless, a transfer is digital w/o further
>conversions and that's good enough. For a 1 hr. 25. min 44/16 file you
>need abt. an hour to transfer. There are some other limitations as to
>what kind of files and from what sources one can upload/download the
>music but I'm satisfied that I can do own uncompressed PCM recordings
>so I didn't study in detail what I can do and what I can't.
>The program is so weird that it calls a Sony database via Internet not
>only at the first install but also later, as it seems fit (perhaps
>after defragmeting, a work with the registry or so). It refuses to
>load until the Internet connection is established and it checks its
>status in the database.
>
>It offers to you some music to buy from the Internet (why should I),
>as well.
>
>I think Sony could make some more money to make things easier to eg.
>broadcast people which could handle makeshift but quite quality
>recordings on the spot and transfer it for broadcast by drag and drop.
>But, naay... "It's a Sony".
>
>From the techincal/hardware side, the MZ-NH1 is a little gem, though.
>
>Edi Zubovic, Crikvenica, Croatia

Thanks for your review, it is very helpful.
Anonymous
November 28, 2004 5:24:27 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On Sun, 28 Nov 2004 13:11:36 +0000, jobs@mistral.net wrote:

>On Sat, 27 Nov 2004 18:42:00 +0100, Edi Zubovic <edi.zubovic[rem
--------------------8<-------------------
>>I think Sony could make some more money to make things easier to eg.
>>broadcast people which could handle makeshift but quite quality
>>recordings on the spot and transfer it for broadcast by drag and drop.
>>But, naay... "It's a Sony".
>>
>>From the techincal/hardware side, the MZ-NH1 is a little gem, though.
>>
>>Edi Zubovic, Crikvenica, Croatia
>
>Thanks for your review, it is very helpful.

You're welcome! --Hovever, since I made these observations outright
(even without peeking into the User's Manual a lot), they would
represent my current opinion about the device and may be by far
imperfect and incomplete.

Edi Zubovic, Crikvenica, Croatia
November 28, 2004 10:05:54 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Edi Zubovic <edi.zubovic[rem this].@ri.htnet.hr> wrote in message news:<kg2jq096lsjddhuhnoaru6j2n9jnhvlr46@4ax.com>...

(snippage)

> Oh, well.
> I can't afford a Nagra V and yes, there are other solutions already
> present competing to the HiMD as to portability.

Apart from flash media recorders, old-style Creative Nomad jukeboxes
with built-in line inputs and laptops with external audio interfaces,
what is there? AFAIK, the newer portables (Ipods, Nomad jukeboxes,
etc.) cannot record from a mic or line input.
Anonymous
November 29, 2004 4:36:46 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Edi Zubovic <edi.zubovic[rem this].@ri.htnet.hr> wrote:

>From the techincal/hardware side, the MZ-NH1 is a little gem, though.

I'm not surprised to read about the way Sony has crippled data transfer
out of their Hi-MD recorders and how they've selected a proprietrary
data format. Sony has no interest in making high quality home recording
and copying easy.

Following Sony's usual consumer product script, the MZ-NH1 will be
discontinued in roughly a year, not be economical to repair once it's
out of warranty, and parts for it will not be stocked after roughly
three years.

--
Len Moskowitz PDAudio, Binaural Mics, Cables, DPA, M-Audio
Core Sound http://www.stealthmicrophones.com
Teaneck, New Jersey USA http://www.core-sound.com
moskowit@core-sound.com Tel: 201-801-0812, FAX: 201-801-0912
Anonymous
November 29, 2004 4:36:47 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On 29 Nov 2004 13:36:46 -0500, moskowit@panix.com (Len Moskowitz)
wrote:

>Following Sony's usual consumer product script, the MZ-NH1 will be
>discontinued in roughly a year, not be economical to repair once it's
>out of warranty, and parts for it will not be stocked after roughly
>three years.


Sony has settled with Ampex for $40 million over patent litigation
which relates to digital still and digital video cameras as well as
PDA's. Back in July this year Ampex announced that it was aiming to
block Sony from importing and selling products in the US which
contained Ampex's intellectual property. Ampex has already come to
license agreements with Canon, Sanyo and Kodak worth several tens of
millions of dollars. Ampex currently has outstanding litigation
against Kodak for violation of the same patents. It looks as though
Ampex will come out from these agreements with ongoing royalty
payments too. Their patents related to "image storage and retrieval".
Anonymous
November 29, 2004 4:39:05 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Paul <tungarbulb@yahoo.com> wrote:

>Apart from flash media recorders, old-style Creative Nomad jukeboxes
>with built-in line inputs and laptops with external audio interfaces,
>what is there? AFAIK, the newer portables (Ipods, Nomad jukeboxes,
>etc.) cannot record from a mic or line input.

You might have a look at our PDAudio system:

www.core-sound.com/HighResRecorderNews.html

--
Len Moskowitz PDAudio, Binaural Mics, Cables, DPA, M-Audio
Core Sound http://www.stealthmicrophones.com
Teaneck, New Jersey USA http://www.core-sound.com
moskowit@core-sound.com Tel: 201-801-0812, FAX: 201-801-0912
November 29, 2004 10:51:55 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

moskowit@panix.com (Len Moskowitz) wrote in message news:<cofqc9$hb0$1@panix2.panix.com>...
> Paul <tungarbulb@yahoo.com> wrote:
>
> >Apart from flash media recorders, old-style Creative Nomad jukeboxes
> >with built-in line inputs and laptops with external audio interfaces,
> >what is there? AFAIK, the newer portables (Ipods, Nomad jukeboxes,
> >etc.) cannot record from a mic or line input.
>
> You might have a look at our PDAudio system:
>
> www.core-sound.com/HighResRecorderNews.html

Which PDA's do you recommend for the backbone of a PDA-based recording
system? What specs should I look for?

- Paul
Anonymous
November 30, 2004 12:01:02 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On 2004-11-27, Mike Rivers <mrivers@d-and-d.com> wrote:

> Well, the original Sony NetMD would certainly qualify. That was the
> system that wouldn't let you transfer a file out of the USB port at
> all unless it go on the Minidisk from the computer. In other words, no
> file transfers of original recordings.

I have a problem with anything that seeks to lock me out of my OWN
recordings of my OWN music.

It's their right to swing their fist, until it hits my nose. Their
copy protection infringes my rights when it forbids me to access my
own music.

Sony missed an opportunity to revolutionize the home recording industry here.
Anonymous
November 30, 2004 12:07:35 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On 2004-11-29, Len Moskowitz <moskowit@panix.com> wrote:

> I'm not surprised to read about the way Sony has crippled data transfer
> out of their Hi-MD recorders and how they've selected a proprietrary
> data format. Sony has no interest in making high quality home recording
> and copying easy.

I'd heard they had, and that you could use the new sony MD's as an
uninhibited digital recorder. Now I understand I was misinformed.
Pity. Perhaps nonvolatile storage devices like flash will reach the
price points such as currently held by minidisc or CDR.
Anonymous
November 30, 2004 12:07:36 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

james of tucson wrote:
> On 2004-11-29, Len Moskowitz <moskowit@panix.com> wrote:
>
>
>>I'm not surprised to read about the way Sony has crippled data transfer
>>out of their Hi-MD recorders and how they've selected a proprietrary
>>data format. Sony has no interest in making high quality home recording
>>and copying easy.
>
>
> I'd heard they had, and that you could use the new sony MD's as an
> uninhibited digital recorder. Now I understand I was misinformed.
> Pity. Perhaps nonvolatile storage devices like flash will reach the
> price points such as currently held by minidisc or CDR.

You are only denied digital uploadability of recordings made
from the digital input of a HiMD. Granted, that's a big
_only_ if the pre's on the HiMD are as noisy as on previous
models.


Bob
--

"Things should be described as simply as possible, but no
simpler."

A. Einstein
Anonymous
November 30, 2004 12:45:26 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Frank Vuotto wrote:
>
> Sony has settled with Ampex for $40 million over patent litigation
> which relates to digital still and digital video cameras as well as
> PDA's. Back in July this year Ampex announced that it was aiming to
> block Sony from importing and selling products in the US which
> contained Ampex's intellectual property. Ampex has already come to
> license agreements with Canon, Sanyo and Kodak worth several tens of
> millions of dollars. Ampex currently has outstanding litigation
> against Kodak for violation of the same patents. It looks as though
> Ampex will come out from these agreements with ongoing royalty
> payments too. Their patents related to "image storage and retrieval".

....as anyone who ever worked with a VPR-3/Zeus would understand why. IMO it's always good to see actual pioneer patentholders (the ones with decades of manufacturing experience) receiving royalties--I've seen way too much paid of late on theoretical patents acquired by rollups.
Anonymous
November 30, 2004 1:07:16 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

> Following Sony's usual consumer product script, the MZ-NH1 will be
> discontinued in roughly a year, not be economical to repair once it's
> out of warranty, and parts for it will not be stocked after roughly
> three years.

You forgot proprietary storage media and software on par with hazardous
waste.

-John O
Anonymous
November 30, 2004 2:28:01 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Paul <tungarbulb@yahoo.com> wrote:

>Which PDA's do you recommend for the backbone of a PDA-based recording
>system? What specs should I look for?

The HP iPAQ h2215 and h2210 are reasonably priced (under $250) and very
small PDAs that works fine as a high resolution audio recorder. It
records to SD flash memory cards. With a single 1 GB card, it can
record 92 minutes at 16/44.1 (CD quality) or an hour at 24-bit/44.1. It
will easily fit into your shirt pocket with room to spare and also
supports 24/96 recording.

You can use more than one card for seamless, continuous recording for
pretty much as long as you like. Gidluck Mastering's Live2496 recording
program provides this neat feature.

And SanDisk (the flash memory manufacturer) says that their 2 GB SD
cards will be released before the end of the year. That will let you
double the recording time per card.

If you need recording times up to hundreds of hours, please contact us
for other system configurations.



--
Len Moskowitz PDAudio, Binaural Mics, Cables, DPA, M-Audio
Core Sound http://www.stealthmicrophones.com
Teaneck, New Jersey USA http://www.core-sound.com
moskowit@core-sound.com Tel: 201-801-0812, FAX: 201-801-0912
Anonymous
November 30, 2004 2:39:38 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On or about Sat, 27 Nov 2004 18:42:00 +0100, Edi Zubovic <edi.zubovic[rem
this].@ri.htnet.hr> allegedly wrote:

> HiMD records PCM in a file with the proprietary extension "*.oma". Up
> to recently, Sonic Stage hasn't even been capable of transferring it
> to any other usable format; it merely offered listening to a
> transferred recording with its own player. It's a totally useless
> approach. Oh yes, it offered burning a "ATRAC-CD" (???), the kind of
> CD writing I don't bother to think about and I don't frankly know
> where I could listen to such Atrac CD's.

The other day I saw a glossy flogging CD & DVD players, and all the Sony
ones offered ATRAC-CD playback. I wondered what that might be for. Now I
suppose I know, though I don't think I'll go rushing out to get one.


Noel Bachelor noelbachelorAT(From:_domain)
Language Recordings Inc (Darwin Australia)
Anonymous
November 30, 2004 2:02:56 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Kurt Albershardt" <kurt@nv.net> wrote in message
news:312fnlF36jbkjU1@uni-berlin.de


> IMO it's always good to see actual pioneer patentholders (the ones
> with decades of manufacturing experience) receiving royalties--I've
> seen way too much paid of late on theoretical patents acquired by
> rollups.


That probably won't make much of a dent in the financials of Sony, which had
$72 billion in sales for 2003. But Ampex's suit could net it some
much-needed money, since it lost $5.8 million in 2003 on sales of $43.4
million. "If Ampex gets even just a tiny percentage of Sony sales in
licensing fees, that would produce some serious revenue for Ampex," says
Bromberg.

Looks like some mining might be happening in this case:

http://www.forbes.com/infoimaging/2004/07/14/cx_pp_0714...

"Patent mining has become a popular activity in the tech sector," says
Future Image analyst Paul Worthington. "Digital imaging is particularly
vulnerable to this practice because it's such a hot business and because,
although no technology is built in a vacuum, digital imaging builds upon so
many previous technologies."


"But Ampex's suit could net it some much-needed money, since it lost $5.8
million in 2003 on sales of $43.4 million. "If Ampex gets even just a tiny
percentage of Sony sales in licensing fees, that would produce some serious
revenue for Ampex," says Bromberg. "
Anonymous
November 30, 2004 8:24:51 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

james of tucson <fishbowl@radagast.home.conservatory.com> wrote:

> On 2004-11-29, Frank Vuotto <deepthrob@hotmail.com> wrote:
>
> > Well, they act like they own MINE too. All I want is easy access to my
> > own original recordings.
>
> I believe you could make a case that you have a fundamental right to
> access your own recordings, and that Sony is abridging your rights by
> actively preventing your access.

I agree that this makes the product worthless. So why buy it...? By
paying you accept Sony's offer and you have an agreement with Sony. Once
you have agreed, well ... you have accepted the restrictions.

Lars


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