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Internet keeps slowing down after multiple resets.

Last response: in Networking
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December 31, 2012 9:54:44 PM

This problem only seemed to arise after messing with my MTU a few days back to 48 so I could play an online game with lower ping, but have since changed it back to 1500.

Since then, my internet has been slowing down every 30 minutes to an hour and won't speed back up until I reset the router and the problem continues after that.

I've fresh installed Windows 7, updated the Firmware on my DIR-636L, changed my DNS multiple times, unhooked my DIR-636L and have been only using my SURFboard SB6141 modem and the problem has yet to be fixed.

I'm clueless at this point what I can do to fix it.

I took a Netalyzer test and here are the results. I bolded the important stuff:



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Major Abnormalities –

Your ISP's DNS server is slow to lookup names


Minor Aberrations –

The measured network latency was somewhat high
Network packet buffering may be excessive
Not all DNS types were correctly processed
Your web browser has a problem accessing IPv6 sites
The path between our system and your network does not appear to handle fragmented IPv6 traffic properly
Your computer's clock is substantially slow


Address-based Tests + –
NAT detection (?): No NAT Detected +
Local Network Interfaces (?): OK +
DNS-based host information (?): OK +
Reachability Tests + –
TCP connectivity (?): OK +
UDP connectivity (?): OK +
Traceroute (?): OK +
Path MTU (?): OK +
Network Access Link Properties + –
Network latency measurements (?): Latency: 600ms Loss: 0.0% –
The round-trip time (RTT) between your computer and our server is 600 msec, which is somewhat high. This may be due to a variety of factors, including distance between your computer and our server, a slow network link, or other network traffic.

We recorded no packet loss between your system and our server.
During this test, the applet observed one reordered packet.
TCP connection setup latency (?): 130ms +
Network background health measurement (?): no transient outages +
Network bandwidth (?): Upload 780 Kbit/sec, Download 5.1 Mbit/sec +
Network buffer measurements (?): Uplink 1300 ms, Downlink is good –
We estimate your uplink as having 1300 msec of buffering. This is quite high, and you may experience substantial disruption to your network performance when performing interactive tasks such as web-surfing while simultaneously conducting large uploads. With such a buffer, real-time applications such as games or audio chat can work quite poorly when conducting large uploads at the same time.
We were not able to produce enough traffic to load the downlink buffer, or the downlink buffer is particularly small. You probably have excellent behavior when downloading files and attempting to do other tasks.

HTTP Tests + –
Address-based HTTP proxy detection (?): OK +
Content-based HTTP proxy detection (?): OK +
HTTP proxy detection via malformed requests (?): OK +
Filetype-based filtering (?): OK +
HTTP caching behavior (?): OK +
JavaScript-based tests (?): OK +
DNS Tests + –
Restricted domain DNS lookup (?): OK +
Unrestricted domain DNS lookup (?): OK +
Direct DNS support (?): OK +
Direct EDNS support (?): OK +
DNS resolver address (?): OK +
DNS resolver properties (?): Lookup latency 1700ms –
Your ISP's DNS resolver requires 1700 msec to conduct an external lookup. It takes 57 msec for your ISP's DNS resolver to lookup a name on our server.
This is particularly slow, and you may see significant performance degradation as a result.

Your resolver correctly uses TCP requests when necessary.
Your resolver is using QTYPE=A for default queries.
Your resolver is not automatically performing IPv6 queries.
Your DNS resolver requests DNSSEC records.
Your DNS resolver advertises the ability to accept DNS packets of up to 4096 bytes.
Your DNS resolver can successfully receive a smaller (~1400 byte) DNS response.
Your DNS resolver is unable to receive a large (>1500 byte) DNS response successfully, even though it advertises itself as EDNS-enabled.
Your DNS resolver accepts DNS responses of up to 1472 bytes.
Your resolver does not use 0x20 randomization, but will pass names in a case-sensitive manner.
Your ISP's DNS server cannot use IPv6.
Your DNS resolver may have significant transport-problems with the upcoming DNSSEC deployments. The resolver is incapable of handling UDP fragmentation.
Direct probing of DNS resolvers (?) –
Your system is configured to use 2 DNS resolver(s).
The resolver at 209.18.47.61 (austx-dns-cac-103) could not process the following tested types:

Medium (~1300B) TXT records
Large (~3000B) TXT records
Large (~3000B) TXT records fetched with EDNS0

It does not validate DNSSEC. It does not wildcard NXDOMAIN errors. The resolver reports a number of additional properties. Show them.
The resolver at 209.18.47.62 (austx-dns-cac-110) could not process the following tested types:

Medium (~1300B) TXT records
Large (~3000B) TXT records
Large (~3000B) TXT records fetched with EDNS0

It does not validate DNSSEC. It wildcards NXDOMAIN errors. Instead of an error it returns the following IP address(es): 66.152.109.110, 198.105.251.46. The resolver reports a number of additional properties. Show them.

DNS glue policy (?): OK +
DNS resolver port randomization (?): OK +
DNS lookups of popular domains (?): OK +
DNS external proxy (?): OK +
DNS results wildcarding (?): OK +
DNS-level redirection of specific sites (?): OK +
Direct probing of DNS roots (?): +
IPv6 Tests + –
DNS support for IPv6 (?): OK +
IPv4, IPv6, and your web browser (?): IPv6 connectivity problem –
Your browser successfully fetched a test image from our IPv6 server. Unfortunately, this is substantially slower than IPv4: it took 0.8 seconds longer to fetch the image over IPv6 compared to IPv4. Your browser prefers IPv6 over IPv4.

IPv6 connectivity (?): OK +
IPv6 TCP connectivity (?): OK +
IPv6 Path MTU (?): Warning –
Your system can not send or receive fragmented traffic over IPv6.
The path between your network and our system supports an MTU of at least 1496 bytes. The path between our system and your network has an MTU of 1500 bytes. The path between our system and your network does not appear to handle fragmented IPv6 traffic properly.

IPv6 Traceroute (?): OK +
Host Properties + –
System clock accuracy (?): Warning –
Your computer's clock is 86270 seconds slow.
Browser properties (?): OK +
Uploaded data (?): OK
January 1, 2013 9:36:37 AM

Does anyone know a possible solution?

Also, happy new years.
January 3, 2013 10:24:15 AM

Verify you LAN driver? Try other versions if available? Disable IPv6.

Contact your ISP.
!