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looking for schems to build 48 ph power supply

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Anonymous
a b ) Power supply
December 2, 2004 8:17:55 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

I am looking for schemes to build 48 ph power supply which can work with
6-18 v dc range
its very important that it would work from 6 v
any suggestions ?
thanks all
Oleg Kaizerman(gebe) Hollyland
Anonymous
a b ) Power supply
December 2, 2004 10:15:03 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Mike Rivers" wrote ...
> Are you sure you want phantom power with that voltage? There's an
> official phantom power of 12V and some mics are designed to work with
> as low as 9V, but with a range like that, you may be talking about a
> different (not phantom) power scheme like that used to power condenser
> mics in aircraft headsets. That applies the voltage across the mic
> wires (the single-ended center conductor and the shield) through a
> resistor, and a capacitor is used to isolate the DC from the powered
> microphone output.
>
> Phantom power applies the same voltage (referneced to ground or
> shield) to both leads of a two-wire microphone connection, and it's
> most commonly 48V.

Oleg knows what 48p is. (From reading about his years of
experiences on r.a.m.p.s) But indeed, it would be better to
have a few more details about what he is trying to do.
Anonymous
a b ) Power supply
December 2, 2004 4:06:55 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

> >>I am looking for schemes to build 48 ph power supply which can work with
> >>6-18 v dc range


Marlin P. Jones & Assoc., Inc
10V to 20V in (+12V to 48V ) 48V out
http://www.mpja.com/productview.asp?product=15438+PS
$10.95

--
Related resources
Anonymous
a b ) Power supply
December 2, 2004 6:51:26 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <10qucbqc0j39k5d@corp.supernews.com> rcrowley7@xprt.net writes:

> Oleg knows what 48p is. (From reading about his years of
> experiences on r.a.m.p.s) But indeed, it would be better to
> have a few more details about what he is trying to do.

Oh, boy, did I misread that query! I saw the "48" part the second time
around, and the mention of a lower voltage range triggered an
experience I had recently with powering aircraft headset microphones.
Sorry for the misdirected reply.

I'd use a DC-DC converter, or a stock phantom supply and a commercial
inverter. No sense in trying to build something you can buy.

--
I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
Anonymous
a b ) Power supply
December 2, 2004 9:11:33 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

I need the main power would feed the phantom for the mike and will provide
the dc for lectrosonic transmitter or zaxcom gold line
that is a project I call phantom boom suspension holder which would be
placed between the mike suspension and the last part of my boom to
eliminate need to work with cable on the boom at all ( my boomen are all
drummer players so there is no big problem with extra weight :-))


--
Oleg kaizerman (gebe) Hollyland
"Richard Crowley" <rcrowley7@xprt.net> wrote in message
news:10qucbqc0j39k5d@corp.supernews.com...
> "Mike Rivers" wrote ...
>> Are you sure you want phantom power with that voltage? There's an
>> official phantom power of 12V and some mics are designed to work with
>> as low as 9V, but with a range like that, you may be talking about a
>> different (not phantom) power scheme like that used to power condenser
>> mics in aircraft headsets. That applies the voltage across the mic
>> wires (the single-ended center conductor and the shield) through a
>> resistor, and a capacitor is used to isolate the DC from the powered
>> microphone output.
>>
>> Phantom power applies the same voltage (referneced to ground or
>> shield) to both leads of a two-wire microphone connection, and it's
>> most commonly 48V.
>
> Oleg knows what 48p is. (From reading about his years of
> experiences on r.a.m.p.s) But indeed, it would be better to
> have a few more details about what he is trying to do.
>
Anonymous
a b ) Power supply
December 2, 2004 11:22:25 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

thanks
Oleg
"Port" <port@vintageproaudio.com> wrote in message
news:qK6dnWJwCcpDxDLcRVn-iA@comcast.com...
> >>I am looking for schemes to build 48 ph power supply which can work with
> >>6-18 v dc range


Marlin P. Jones & Assoc., Inc
10V to 20V in (+12V to 48V ) 48V out
http://www.mpja.com/productview.asp?product=15438+PS
$10.95

--
Anonymous
a b ) Power supply
December 6, 2004 6:52:14 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Another simple example, much like Scott's idea but using inverters
as the oscillator, and "doublers" instead of a transformer:

http://paia.com/phantsch.gif

FWIW, the M-Audio Omnio i/o box uses this idea (with a 555 timer)
to get phantom power for their INA103-based preamps.

-Tom

--

To respond by email, replace "somewhere" with "astro" in the
return address.
Anonymous
a b ) Power supply
December 16, 2004 5:02:25 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Tom Loredo <loredo@somewhere.cornell.edu> wrote:
>
>Another simple example, much like Scott's idea but using inverters
>as the oscillator, and "doublers" instead of a transformer:
>
>http://paia.com/phantsch.gif

One caution: all of the circuits called out so far will not meet the
P48V current specification. Many of them will struggle to put out 2 or 3
mA and then drop their voltage under the stress.

If you're using a mic that has a high phantom power current requirement
(e.g., Earthworks, Schoeps), these circuits will not work.

--
Len Moskowitz PDAudio, Binaural Mics, Cables, DPA, M-Audio
Core Sound http://www.stealthmicrophones.com
Teaneck, New Jersey USA http://www.core-sound.com
moskowit@core-sound.com Tel: 201-801-0812, FAX: 201-801-0912
!