What Is the record pad

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

What is a record pad and how do I do it?
31 answers Last reply
More about what record
  1. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    "KMF" wrote ...
    > What is a record pad and how do I do it?

    "pad" in what context?
    A "pad" can be a thick felt mat, or a kind of synth voice,
    or an electrical attenuator, and maybe even other definitions.
  2. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    KMF wrote:
    > What is a record pad and how do I do it?

    If you're referring to analog tape, the record pad is a section of tape
    that is leadered off and used for record alignment throughout the project.

    --
    Eric

    www.Raw-Tracks.com
  3. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    On 5 Dec 2004 06:51:13 -0800, KerkRobbin@aol.com (KMF) wrote:

    >What is a record pad and how do I do it? <snip>

    The "pad" in analog tape parlance is a section of tape at the head of
    a reel on which you can record the originating deck's head and EQ
    signature using standard alignment tones (100 Hz, 1 and 15 KHz) for
    use on another deck for alignment purposes. Blank time is left in the
    "pad" to provide some tape for the engineer using a subsequent deck to
    set up his record section to match (well, as much as possible)
    azimuth, OPL and EQ with whatever the originating deck had. You
    started seeing this in the late '60s, when production would jump from
    studio to studio at the dawn of the "multi-track era." Prior to that,
    in the dark ages of 3 track, you'd get an opening pad of three
    alignment tones and that'd be it, but after copious multi-tracking in
    different studios became the norm, the pad was enlarged to provide a
    "scratch pad" area when the subsequent studio could play with record
    parameters, also. Usually the "pad" is marked off from production
    takes with a length of leader, although not always. Hopefully, the
    sending engineer would scribble out his tone and pad times on the box,
    but many didn't.

    How to do it? Well, everyone seems to have their own way of doing
    this, usually to the consternation of whoever gets the tape later. I
    used to start with I KHz at 0 VU (usually 250 nWb/m back in my day)
    for 60 seconds, 5 second break, then 100 Hz, break, then 15 Khz, then
    a 3 minute record pad, then a leader break. I never got too many
    complaints from others about that, although some always want a longer
    record pad after the line-up tones, some would want more frequencies,
    and some would want longer tones. Want to piss off someone down the
    line? Give 'em the tones at 5 seconds each and a 30 second record
    pad. The problem with doing that for the subsequent engineer is that
    it always required a lot of rewinding to get through the line-up, and
    unnecessary winding is a bad thing, period.

    Usually, guys that would do this or wouldn't send you tones at all
    would also be the ones who'd send you a really screwed up
    tape...levels all over the map on takes, tracks pushed way into
    saturation, lousy head line-up, you name it. I remember getting some
    ¼" two track "masters" from a certain funk singer who shall remain
    nameless that were so screwed up, I sent them back with a note, "Try
    again, do it right this time." He wanted them dubbed to ½" 2 trk,
    because "that was mo' betta..." Durrrrrrrrr.... His "pad" was 1 KHz
    at some ungodly hot level into saturation, and 100 Hz about 15 dB
    down...and no azimuth tone at all. No sheet came with them, just some
    indecipherable scribbling of song names on the box with no times. The
    clown was running his own machines and obviously had not a clue as to
    what he was doing. Also annoying were traces of coke dust all over
    the reels. He didn't have many hits after that, either, as he had an
    extended engagement at Hotel Greybar to attend to.

    dB
  4. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    In article <cf553486.0412050651.793d7f06@posting.google.com> KerkRobbin@aol.com writes:

    > What is a record pad and how do I do it?

    "Pad" means a lot of things. What's the context?

    A mat under a phonograph record?

    A couple of feet of blank tape before the recording starts?

    A dreamy, diddly stringy-synthy background sound that drifts around a
    musical piece?

    An attenuator?

    Something to keep your back from getting tired when you're sitting at
    the console?

    The place where you both live and record?

    In fact, just what the heck IS a "record pad?"

    --
    I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
    However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
    lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
    you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
    and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
  5. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    "KMF" <KerkRobbin@aol.com> wrote in message
    news:cf553486.0412050651.793d7f06@posting.google.com...
    > What is a record pad and how do I do it?

    You rent buy or borrow a place to live, set up all of you gear and then
    invite hep cats and mellow dudes over to record at your pad. ( black
    lights, bean bags, bead curtains, and cute girls body painting each other
    strewn about can make it a totally groovy scene. YMMV )

    John L Rice
    Drummer@ImJohn.com

    PS - sorry, just having some fun, please explain a little more of what you
    are trying to do and we'll be better able to assist you.
  6. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    In article <znr1102260633k@trad>, Mike Rivers <mrivers@d-and-d.com> wrote:
    >
    >In fact, just what the heck IS a "record pad?"

    It's the cotton thing that keeps good tape-to-head contact on a Uher 4000.
    --scott

    --
    "C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
  7. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    > It's the cotton thing that keeps good tape-to-head
    > contact on a Uher 4000.

    It's more commonly called a pressure pad.
  8. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    On Sun, 5 Dec 2004 12:33:32 -0800, "John L Rice" <Drummer@ImJohn.com>
    wrote:

    >( black
    >lights, bean bags, bead curtains, and cute girls body painting each other
    >strewn about can make it a totally groovy scene. <snip>

    Hmmmm...sounds like American Recording back in the early '70s!

    dB
  9. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    In article <covhp2$mkm$1@panix2.panix.com> kludge@panix.com writes:

    > It's the cotton thing that keeps good tape-to-head contact on a Uher 4000.

    I thought that was a pressure pad. Sometimes it could be a play pad.

    --
    I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
    However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
    lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
    you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
    and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
  10. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    "Mike Rivers" <mrivers@d-and-d.com> wrote in message news:znr1102280969k@trad...
    >
    > In article <covhp2$mkm$1@panix2.panix.com> kludge@panix.com writes:
    >
    > > It's the cotton thing that keeps good tape-to-head contact on a Uher 4000.
    >
    > I thought that was a pressure pad. Sometimes it could be a play pad.
    >
    > --
    > I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
    > However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
    > lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
    > you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
    > and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo


    Are you absolutely certian this isn't a reference to my house?

    DM
  11. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    << Well, everyone seems to have their own way of doing
    this, usually to the consternation of whoever gets the tape later. I
    used to start with I KHz at 0 VU (usually 250 nWb/m back in my day)
    for 60 seconds, 5 second break, then 100 Hz, break, then 15 Khz, then
    a 3 minute record pad, then a leader break. >>

    My version, no doubt learned from Steve Guy at Location Recording Service, was
    1k, 10k, 50, then Dolby or a 1k through dbx. Nothing following the 50Hz tone
    meant no NR, just in case the reel became separated from its box.

    Scott Fraser
  12. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    On 06 Dec 2004 02:40:25 GMT, scotfraser@aol.com (ScotFraser) wrote:

    >My version, no doubt learned from Steve Guy at Location Recording Service, was
    >1k, 10k, 50, then Dolby or a 1k through dbx. Nothing following the 50Hz tone
    >meant no NR, just in case the reel became separated from its box. <snip>

    Calibratable "NR" of any kind was a LITTLE before my time. Remember,
    this was back when Scotch 250 was a "miracle" tape.

    There was considerable disagreement about which highs and lows to use
    back then. Some argued that, due to different head geometries, 50 was
    too low, as expected reproduce levels at 50 were less predictable than
    at 100 between different head makes, but that all machines would be
    just as well EQ'd for bass at 100. Still others (including me) argued
    that 10 KHz was too low to achieve quick resolution of azimuth for
    phasing issues, especially on the tall multi-tracks where gap scatter
    was a invariably a problem. Most of what I'd get was 100/1/10, I'd
    send out 100/1/15. 15 would be a good way to let the other end know
    if their heads were in need of lapping, too!

    dB
  13. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    In article <20041205214025.06323.00001090@mb-m26.aol.com>,
    ScotFraser <scotfraser@aol.com> wrote:
    ><< Well, everyone seems to have their own way of doing
    >this, usually to the consternation of whoever gets the tape later. I
    >used to start with I KHz at 0 VU (usually 250 nWb/m back in my day)
    >for 60 seconds, 5 second break, then 100 Hz, break, then 15 Khz, then
    >a 3 minute record pad, then a leader break. >>
    >
    >My version, no doubt learned from Steve Guy at Location Recording Service, was
    >1k, 10k, 50, then Dolby or a 1k through dbx. Nothing following the 50Hz tone
    >meant no NR, just in case the reel became separated from its box.

    I learned to just do 1KC in the broadcast world. It was a few years before I
    saw 1K and 10K tones.

    These days I put a full tone ladder down. Why not? Somebody might need it
    someday.
    --scott
    --
    "C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
  14. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    you guys are generous with the clients tape. I do 30 sec each of 1k 10khz
    and 100hz and a one minute pad
    --Lou Gimenez
    The Music Lab
    2" 24track w all the Goodies
    www.musiclabnyc.com


    > From: kludge@panix.com (Scott Dorsey)
    > Organization: Former users of Netcom shell (1989-2000)
    > Newsgroups: rec.audio.pro
    > Date: 6 Dec 2004 10:25:53 -0500
    > Subject: Re: What Is the record pad
    >
    > In article <20041205214025.06323.00001090@mb-m26.aol.com>,
    > ScotFraser <scotfraser@aol.com> wrote:
    >> << Well, everyone seems to have their own way of doing
    >> this, usually to the consternation of whoever gets the tape later. I
    >> used to start with I KHz at 0 VU (usually 250 nWb/m back in my day)
    >> for 60 seconds, 5 second break, then 100 Hz, break, then 15 Khz, then
    >> a 3 minute record pad, then a leader break. >>
    >>
    >> My version, no doubt learned from Steve Guy at Location Recording Service,
    >> was
    >> 1k, 10k, 50, then Dolby or a 1k through dbx. Nothing following the 50Hz tone
    >> meant no NR, just in case the reel became separated from its box.
    >
    > I learned to just do 1KC in the broadcast world. It was a few years before I
    > saw 1K and 10K tones.
    >
    > These days I put a full tone ladder down. Why not? Somebody might need it
    > someday.
    > --scott
    > --
    > "C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
  15. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    "DeserTBoB" wrote:
    > On 5 Dec 2004 06:51:13 -0800, KerkRobbin@aol.com (KMF) wrote:
    >
    > >What is a record pad and how do I do it? <snip>
    >
    > The "pad" in analog tape parlance is a section of tape at the head of
    > a reel on which you can record the originating deck's head and EQ
    > signature using standard alignment tones (100 Hz, 1 and 15 KHz) for
    > use on another deck for alignment purposes.
    <snip>

    Putting it on the tail is probably better. I learned this the hard way when
    I let the intern do the alignment on the multitrack for a mix session. For
    some reason he decided to do record alignment as well, and apparently didn't
    notice the 15 or 20 seconds of leader between the pad and the first song
    while recording the bias tone.

    The drag for me persoaally about that was that I got fired instead of him
    since it was technically my responsibility.

    -jw
  16. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    John Washburn wrote:
    > Putting it on the tail is probably better. I learned this the hard way when
    > I let the intern do the alignment on the multitrack for a mix session. For
    > some reason he decided to do record alignment as well, and apparently didn't
    > notice the 15 or 20 seconds of leader between the pad and the first song
    > while recording the bias tone.

    Another good reason for putting it at the tail is you don't need to
    rewind all the way to the beginning of the reel to do the alignment. If
    it's at the tail, you just need to thread the tape and rewind into the
    tape about 3-5 minutes, rather than the full 16. Seems trivial, but if
    you have a dozen other things you need to get done before a session
    starts, the last thing you want to do is sit and wait for tape to rewind.

    --
    Eric

    www.Raw-Tracks.com
  17. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    On Mon, 06 Dec 2004 20:41:58 GMT, "John Washburn"
    <johnwashburn99@nyc.rr.com> wrote:

    >Putting it on the tail is probably better. I learned this the hard way when
    >I let the intern do the alignment on the multitrack for a mix session. For
    >some reason he decided to do record alignment as well, and apparently didn't
    >notice the 15 or 20 seconds of leader between the pad and the first song
    >while recording the bias tone. <snip>

    First rule: READ THE BOX AND/OR SHEET THROROUGHLY BEFORE EVEN
    THREADING.

    >The drag for me persoaally about that was that I got fired instead of him
    >since it was technically my responsibility. <snip>

    A rough break, but still, why was he even bothering to line up the
    record sections? He should've been told in no uncertain terms,
    "Playback line-up only." I've gotten a few tapes now and then with
    the pad on the tail, and it makes sense, especially since you get it
    tails out, anyway. Communication with assisting tech people is
    imperative, sure, but he should have at least known enough to read the
    sheet and have a ROUGH idea of how much pad he had to work with. If
    he'd known it was a mixdown run, he would've known record line-up
    wasn't even necessary in the first place. Another "intern" fave:
    line up the machine on the wrong curve. Makes for LOTS of blue air
    during the first playback!

    dB
  18. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    DeserTBoB wrote:
    > If
    > he'd known it was a mixdown run, he would've known record line-up
    > wasn't even necessary in the first place.

    I beg to differ on that point of view. Even on mix sessions, the machine
    should be lined up for recording. It's not unusual for a last minute
    overdub to crop up. The extra couple of minutes it takes to do the
    record alignment while setting up for the session is worth it. If the
    producer all of the sudden gets the idea that "This song really does
    need cowbell", the last thing he wants to hear is that he'll have to
    wait until the machine get aligned for recording.

    --
    Eric

    www.Raw-Tracks.com
  19. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    On Mon, 06 Dec 2004 18:51:44 -0600, EricK <eric@Raw-Tracks.com> wrote:

    >I beg to differ on that point of view. Even on mix sessions, the machine
    >should be lined up for recording. It's not unusual for a last minute
    >overdub to crop up. The extra couple of minutes it takes to do the
    >record alignment while setting up for the session is worth it. If the
    >producer all of the sudden gets the idea that "This song really does
    >need cowbell", the last thing he wants to hear is that he'll have to
    >wait until the machine get aligned for recording. <snip>

    Point well taken.

    dB
  20. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    "EricK" <eric@Raw-Tracks.com> wrote in message
    news:31jvpsF3d6jc7U1@individual.net...
    > John Washburn wrote:
    > > Putting it on the tail is probably better. I learned this the hard way
    when
    > > I let the intern do the alignment on the multitrack for a mix session.
    For
    > > some reason he decided to do record alignment as well, and apparently
    didn't
    > > notice the 15 or 20 seconds of leader between the pad and the first song
    > > while recording the bias tone.
    >
    > Another good reason for putting it at the tail is you don't need to
    > rewind all the way to the beginning of the reel to do the alignment. If
    > it's at the tail, you just need to thread the tape and rewind into the
    > tape about 3-5 minutes, rather than the full 16. Seems trivial, but if
    > you have a dozen other things you need to get done before a session
    > starts, the last thing you want to do is sit and wait for tape to rewind.

    Also, if there happens to be a genius take towards the end of the reel that
    goes long, it's not the end of the world if it records over the tones--it's
    lot better than running out of tape would be, anyway.

    -jw
  21. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    On Sun, 5 Dec 2004 12:33:32 -0800, "John L Rice" <Drummer@ImJohn.com>
    wrote:

    >
    >"KMF" <KerkRobbin@aol.com> wrote in message
    >news:cf553486.0412050651.793d7f06@posting.google.com...
    >> What is a record pad and how do I do it?
    >
    >You rent buy or borrow a place to live, set up all of you gear and then
    >invite hep cats and mellow dudes over to record at your pad. ( black
    >lights, bean bags, bead curtains, and cute girls body painting each other
    >strewn about can make it a totally groovy scene. YMMV )

    What, no mention of lava lamps? Or are those standard equipment at
    even non-pad studios?

    >John L Rice
    >Drummer@ImJohn.com
    >
    >PS - sorry, just having some fun, please explain a little more of what you
    >are trying to do and we'll be better able to assist you.
    >

    -----
    http://mindspring.com/~benbradley
  22. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    "Ben Bradley" <ben_nospam_bradley@mindspring.com> wrote in message
    news:0cbar0916dpcmr8eo83526f39bdhff8iko@4ax.com...
    > On Sun, 5 Dec 2004 12:33:32 -0800, "John L Rice" <Drummer@ImJohn.com>
    > wrote:
    >
    > >
    > >"KMF" <KerkRobbin@aol.com> wrote in message
    > >news:cf553486.0412050651.793d7f06@posting.google.com...
    > >> What is a record pad and how do I do it?
    > >
    > >You rent buy or borrow a place to live, set up all of you gear and then
    > >invite hep cats and mellow dudes over to record at your pad. ( black
    > >lights, bean bags, bead curtains, and cute girls body painting each other
    > >strewn about can make it a totally groovy scene. YMMV )
    >
    > What, no mention of lava lamps? Or are those standard equipment at
    > even non-pad studios?
    >


    Whoops! Thanks Ben, yes, a lava lamp and maybe a strobe light. Oh yeah!
    Color organs next to the near fields!

    John L Rice
    Drummer@ImJohn.com
  23. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    On Mon, 6 Dec 2004 20:34:28 -0800, "John L Rice" <Drummer@ImJohn.com>
    wrote:

    >Whoops! Thanks Ben, yes, a lava lamp and maybe a strobe light. Oh yeah!
    >Color organs next to the near fields! <snip>

    HAR! I actually saw this being "reality" back years ago. Imagine
    some Altec A-2s with COLOR organs sitting next to the
    horns...priceless! And yes, were was a full compliment of lava lamps
    in behind the glass, too. Don't remember too many glass beads in that
    one, though.

    "Color organs" are making a comeback, of sorts! Some plasma TV hawker
    (Philips?) is putting "Envirolight" or some such nonsense on its
    overpriced home TVs. Lots of blue in the sceen? You get blue glow
    out of the sides. Lots of daylight? Yellow side lights! Pool or red
    blood? Red "envirolight!"

    Hmmm...I wonder what'd happen if they were doing one of those
    fraudulent "reality shows" live and happened to point the lens into a
    toilet? BROWN light????

    dB
  24. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    << Calibratable "NR" of any kind was a LITTLE before my time. Remember,
    this was back when Scotch 250 was a "miracle" tape.>>

    Well, I remember when 206 was a brand new big deal.

    <<There was considerable disagreement about which highs and lows to use
    back then. Some argued that, due to different head geometries, 50 was
    too low, as expected reproduce levels at 50 were less predictable than
    at 100 between different head makes, but that all machines would be
    just as well EQ'd for bass at 100. >>

    I went back & forth on the 50 or 100Hz question. Decided to stick with 50Hz
    when I learned a new way to bias, using 50Hz instead of 10kHz.

    Scott Fraser
  25. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    << beg to differ on that point of view. Even on mix sessions, the machine
    should be lined up for recording. It's not unusual for a last minute
    overdub to crop up. The extra couple of minutes it takes to do the
    record alignment while setting up for the session is worth it. If the
    producer all of the sudden gets the idea that "This song really does
    need cowbell", the last thing he wants to hear is that he'll have to
    wait until the machine get aligned for recording.

    --
    Eric
    >>


    *Every* song needs a cowbell...


    Ted Spencer, NYC

    "No amount of classical training will ever teach you what's so cool about
    "Tighten Up" by Archie Bell And The Drells" -author unknown
  26. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    Gee, and I thought it was playing with the budget, so you could provide the
    band with drugs!

    Tom

    "Ted Spencer" <prestokid@aol.com> wrote in message
    news:20041207105838.21939.00001754@mb-m06.aol.com...
    > << beg to differ on that point of view. Even on mix sessions, the machine
    > should be lined up for recording. It's not unusual for a last minute
    > overdub to crop up. The extra couple of minutes it takes to do the
    > record alignment while setting up for the session is worth it. If the
    > producer all of the sudden gets the idea that "This song really does
    > need cowbell", the last thing he wants to hear is that he'll have to
    > wait until the machine get aligned for recording.
    >
    > --
    > Eric
    > >>


    >
    > *Every* song needs a cowbell...
    >
    >
    > Ted Spencer, NYC
    >
    > "No amount of classical training will ever teach you what's so cool about
    > "Tighten Up" by Archie Bell And The Drells" -author unknown
  27. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    I thought he was talking about a string pad.

    --
    I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
    However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
    lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
    you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
    and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
  28. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    On 7 Dec 2004 18:15:07 -0500, mrivers@d-and-d.com (Mike Rivers) wrote:

    >
    >I thought he was talking about a string pad. <snip>

    ....or was it a maxi-pad?
  29. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    >
    >On 7 Dec 2004 18:15:07 -0500, mrivers@d-and-d.com (Mike Rivers) wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>I thought he was talking about a string pad. <snip>
    >
    >...or was it a maxi-pad?
    >

    Herve Villachaize (Actor --Tattoo on Fantasy Island, KnickNack on James Bond)
    was going to build a hotel especially for little people near the LA airport.

    The place would have furniture and dimensions especially suited to little
    people. Five foot ceilings and 4 foot entrances, plus all the properly
    dimensioned beds and bathrooms

    The best part of this was there was to be no rental charged to any of the
    little people who stayed there.


    Unfortunately, Herve died and along with him, his plans for The Stay-Free
    Mini-Pad.
    Richard H. Kuschel
    "I canna change the law of physics."-----Scotty
  30. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    Ouch! LOL
    "Richard Kuschel" <rickpv8945@aol.com> wrote in message
    news:20041212095041.07592.00002115@mb-m01.aol.com...
    > >
    > >On 7 Dec 2004 18:15:07 -0500, mrivers@d-and-d.com (Mike Rivers) wrote:
    > >
    > >>
    > >>I thought he was talking about a string pad. <snip>
    > >
    > >...or was it a maxi-pad?
    > >
    >
    > Herve Villachaize (Actor --Tattoo on Fantasy Island, KnickNack on James
    Bond)
    > was going to build a hotel especially for little people near the LA
    airport.
    >
    > The place would have furniture and dimensions especially suited to little
    > people. Five foot ceilings and 4 foot entrances, plus all the properly
    > dimensioned beds and bathrooms
    >
    > The best part of this was there was to be no rental charged to any of the
    > little people who stayed there.
    >
    >
    > Unfortunately, Herve died and along with him, his plans for The Stay-Free
    > Mini-Pad.
    > Richard H. Kuschel
    > "I canna change the law of physics."-----Scotty
  31. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    On 12 Dec 2004 14:50:41 GMT, rickpv8945@aol.com (Richard Kuschel)
    wrote:

    >Unfortunately, Herve died and along with him, his plans for The Stay-Free
    >Mini-Pad. <snip>

    ba dat BOOMPH!
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