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Name that sound! - Gangsta rap

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Anonymous
December 6, 2004 2:23:36 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Okay, I'm trying to figure out what all those gangsta rap guys (ala Ice
Cube, Snoop, Brotha Lynch) used to get the high pitched sine-wave sound in
songs such as "Murder Was The Case," "Ghetto Bird" and even the low
farty-sounding sine-bass on classics such as "Deez Nuts"....at first I
thought it was probably just a simple signal generator with a few envelopes,
but could it also be a theremin or even a onde martinot for the high stuff?
What about the bass?

Thanks a ton!!

--

Jonny Durango

"Patrick was a saint. I ain't."

http://www.jdurango.com

More about : sound gangsta rap

Anonymous
December 6, 2004 3:31:35 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Mini Moog or Studio Electronics SE-1

Rail
--
Recording Engineer/Software Developer
Rail Jon Rogut Software
http://www.railjonrogut.com
mailto:rail@railjonrogut.com

"Jonny Durango" <jonnybush_from_officedurango1@comcast.net> wrote in message
news:YLMsd.141693$V41.48730@attbi_s52...
> Okay, I'm trying to figure out what all those gangsta rap guys (ala Ice
> Cube, Snoop, Brotha Lynch) used to get the high pitched sine-wave sound in
> songs such as "Murder Was The Case," "Ghetto Bird" and even the low
> farty-sounding sine-bass on classics such as "Deez Nuts"....at first I
> thought it was probably just a simple signal generator with a few
> envelopes,
> but could it also be a theremin or even a onde martinot for the high
> stuff?
> What about the bass?
>
> Thanks a ton!!
>
> --
>
> Jonny Durango
>
> "Patrick was a saint. I ain't."
>
> http://www.jdurango.com
>
>
>
>
Anonymous
December 6, 2004 4:57:23 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Roland TB 303?
Minimoog?
Related resources
Anonymous
December 7, 2004 10:47:47 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

> Seriously, there's good and and bad in all musical genres. To say there's
> no talent in the production of hip hop is really silly. I know a couple
of
---snip---

Hip hop is a "musical" genre? Music implies there's a melody present.
Sure, there's talent... from the orignal recording way back when that's been
nonchalantly resampled.
Anonymous
December 7, 2004 11:43:11 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

I really like it when Eminem projectile vomits on Michael Jackson.

In article <BDD92699.2948D%kylesong@earthlink.net>, KyleSong
<kylesong@earthlink.net> wrote:

> Roland TB 303?
> Minimoog?
>

Posted Via Usenet.com Premium Usenet Newsgroup Services
----------------------------------------------------------
** SPEED ** RETENTION ** COMPLETION ** ANONYMITY **
----------------------------------------------------------
http://www.usenet.com
Anonymous
December 7, 2004 4:16:02 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

geek wrote:

> Oil comes from somewhere.
> Pigment comes from somewhere.
> Horsehair (or whatever interchangeable material you want) comes from
> somewhere.
> Canvas comes from somewhere.
> etc.
>
> It takes an artist to assemble these elements into something else.
> Say....art.

Assembly is not art. Creation is art. Even when I was 8 years old, and
made a collage from magazine clippings in art class, even then, I knew
that wasn't art. The materials above are not art. The *creation* of an
experience from the above raw materials, using both skills of
application, and specific presentations of ideas or concepts that did
NOT previously exist, is art.

> Hip Hop is musical. There is music and melody involved, wherever it
may come
> from.
> It's not C & W or Rock or Pop so it needs it own label...hmmmm...lets
call
> it a Genre.
> It takes an artist to assemble the elements into something else.

Wrong. Factory workers assemble. Artists create. Building a guitar from
a kit doesn't make me Eric Clapton, nor an artist.

> There is good Hip Hop, there is bad Hip Hop. Not everyone who creates
Hip
> Hop (or any other genre for that matter) is an artist.
>
Absolutely true for reasons stated above.

> I've heard "good" Hip Hop, and I've heard "bad" Hip Hop. I can say
the same
> for any other style of music.
>
> For the record, most of what I've heard lately is at least as melodic
as
> have the tunes on popular radio.

Lately, perhaps. Most earlier rap, not.

>Groups like "The Black Eyed Peas", even
> though they are what I like to call "Hip Hop for Backpackers", are
very
> melodic and use less sampling and more real players than most others.
Then
> you have groups like The Roots. They're definitely Hip Hop but they
play
> everything themselves.

They are at least musicians, and artists, if they have created
something that began in their mind. I like them both.

>
> It's really unfair to consider everyone in any category under one
> generalization.
>
> m.

To lump creators into the same category as assemblers is also unfair.
I'm sick of "Look-mommy-I-made-a-poopy" assemblers claiming to be
artists. It takes a lot more to create a song from scratch (from your
mind alone), writing all words and melodies (from your mind alone),
then writing all parts/arrangements (NOT picking from a sample loop
library or pre-packaged sections) from your mind alone. Paint-by-number
is NOT art. Has nothing to do with genre.
Mikey Wozniak
Nova Music Productions
This sig is (bad) haiku
December 7, 2004 7:02:44 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Let's leave music for a minute (wait, that's never happened on this
group...).

Assuming we all know where this stuff comes from, let's simplify;

Oil comes from somewhere.
Pigment comes from somewhere.
Horsehair (or whatever interchangeable material you want) comes from
somewhere.
Canvas comes from somewhere.
etc.

It takes an artist to assemble these elements into something else.
Say....art.

There is good art, there is bad art. Not everyone who paints is an artist.

OK, back to music;

Hip Hop is musical. There is music and melody involved, wherever it may come
from.
It's not C & W or Rock or Pop so it needs it own label...hmmmm...lets call
it a Genre.
It takes an artist to assemble the elements into something else.
There is good Hip Hop, there is bad Hip Hop. Not everyone who creates Hip
Hop (or any other genre for that matter) is an artist.

I've heard "good" Hip Hop, and I've heard "bad" Hip Hop. I can say the same
for any other style of music.

For the record, most of what I've heard lately is at least as melodic as
have the tunes on popular radio. Groups like "The Black Eyed Peas", even
though they are what I like to call "Hip Hop for Backpackers", are very
melodic and use less sampling and more real players than most others. Then
you have groups like The Roots. They're definitely Hip Hop but they play
everything themselves.

It's really unfair to consider everyone in any category under one
generalization.

m.
--


mikerekka at hotmail dot com hates spam


"G Glass" <nobody@nowhere.com> wrote in message
news:o ojtd.206577$hj.197761@fed1read07...
>> Seriously, there's good and and bad in all musical genres. To say
>> there's
>> no talent in the production of hip hop is really silly. I know a couple
> of
> ---snip---
>
> Hip hop is a "musical" genre? Music implies there's a melody present.
> Sure, there's talent... from the orignal recording way back when that's
> been
> nonchalantly resampled.
>
>
Anonymous
December 7, 2004 7:55:35 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

<< Hip hop is a "musical" genre? Music implies there's a melody present.
>>



African drumming has no melody, yet must be considered music.
Scott Fraser
Anonymous
December 7, 2004 7:55:36 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

ScotFraser <scotfraser@aol.com> wrote:
><< Hip hop is a "musical" genre? Music implies there's a melody present.
>>>


>
>African drumming has no melody, yet must be considered music.

What about the stuff they play on Hearts of Space?
--scott
--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
Anonymous
December 7, 2004 9:54:32 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On 7 Dec 2004 12:04:30 -0500, kludge@panix.com (Scott Dorsey) wrote:

>ScotFraser <scotfraser@aol.com> wrote:
>><< Hip hop is a "musical" genre? Music implies there's a melody present.
>>>>


>>
>>African drumming has no melody, yet must be considered music.
>
>What about the stuff they play on Hearts of Space?

Are you saying that stuff has no beat?

>--scott

-----
http://mindspring.com/~benbradley
Anonymous
December 7, 2004 9:54:57 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"G Glass" <nobody@nowhere.com> wrote in message
news:o ojtd.206577$hj.197761@fed1read07...
> > Seriously, there's good and and bad in all musical genres. To say
there's
> > no talent in the production of hip hop is really silly. I know a couple
> of
> ---snip---
>
> Hip hop is a "musical" genre? Music implies there's a melody present.
> Sure, there's talent... from the orignal recording way back when that's
been
> nonchalantly resampled.
>

This line of argument is *so* tired.

-jw
Anonymous
December 7, 2004 10:08:25 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

ScotFraser wrote:

> << Hip hop is a "musical" genre? Music implies there's a melody present.
> >>



> African drumming has no melody, yet must be considered music.
> Scott Fraser

Thank you, sir. You are right.

--
ha
Anonymous
December 7, 2004 11:28:23 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On Mon, 06 Dec 2004 00:31:35 +0000, Rail Jon Rogut wrote:

> Mini Moog or Studio Electronics SE-1
>
> Rail

I find the SE-1 to have a rather soft attack and flabby sound compared to
a minimoog for bass, or even compared to some moog like soft synths I've
used. Still, it seems very popular for hip hop...

For the high pitched stuff, try something Roland like an sh1000, Sh09 or
sh101. Their oscs+filters have a clear cutting sound that my SE-1 won't
do. Roland Alpha Junos are real cheap and even sharper too.
Anonymous
December 8, 2004 12:48:52 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

ScotFraser wrote:
> << What about the stuff they play on Hearts of Space? >>


>
> Hmm, no melody, no rhythm, no harmonic development. What is that
stuff? The
> Krispy Kreme of audio?
>
> Scott Fraser

Strangely enough, tho much of HOS material has little of the above, I
like HOS, simply because they seem to have a great knack for taking the
absolute best of new age stuff - well engineered & produced, for the
most part. It sure does have the intended peace-of-mind effect.

I do hear rhythm in much of it, altho it may be a very slow, subtle
rhythm - perhaps unnoticeable to headbangers used to 160 bpm jungle. It
reminds me of the fact that glass is actually a liquid - it just flows
too slow for us to notice.

Harmonic development is present in much of new age, too. I'd even go as
far as to say that harmonic development is the backbone of much New Age
music. Subtle sometimes, but there.

I've been listening to Sheila Chandra lately (Narada label, early
90's), and if that ain't music and art, I ain't breathin'. It's really
world music as opposed to new age, tho.

BTW, most E. Indian music is great for lovemaking, IMO, as is "Warm My
Heart" by Aaron Neville. Just be sure you finish before he gets to "Ave
Maria" or it'll be a real wood-kill. :) 

Scott, anything happening on "Sun Rings" yet?
Mikey Wozniak
Nova Music Productions
this sig is haiku
December 8, 2004 2:32:20 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

G Glass wrote:
> > Seriously, there's good and and bad in all musical genres. To say
there's
> > no talent in the production of hip hop is really silly. I know a
couple
> of
> ---snip---
>
> Hip hop is a "musical" genre? Music implies there's a melody
present.

Bzzt! False premise. Music implies no such thing.
December 8, 2004 2:41:42 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

novamusic@hotmail.com wrote:
> Assembly is not art. Creation is art. Even when I was 8 years old,
and
> made a collage from magazine clippings in art class, even then, I
knew
> that wasn't art.

I'm afraid you were mistaken.
Anonymous
December 8, 2004 3:04:45 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <1102534902.484605.13800@c13g2000cwb.googlegroups.com>,
stuff@slinkp.com wrote:

> novamusic@hotmail.com wrote:
> > Assembly is not art. Creation is art. Even when I was 8 years old,
> and
> > made a collage from magazine clippings in art class, even then, I
> knew
> > that wasn't art.
>
> I'm afraid you were mistaken.
>

Look at the collage Fillmore posters by David Singer and tell me that isn't art.

-Jay
--
x------- Jay Kadis ------- x---- Jay's Attic Studio ------x
x Lecturer, Audio Engineer x Dexter Records x
x CCRMA, Stanford University x http://www.offbeats.com/ x
x---------- http://ccrma.stanford.edu/~jay/ ------------x
Anonymous
December 8, 2004 5:03:29 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

stuff@slinkp.com wrote:
> novamusic@hotmail.com wrote:
> > Assembly is not art. Creation is art. Even when I was 8 years old,
> and
> > made a collage from magazine clippings in art class, even then, I
> knew
> > that wasn't art.
>
> I'm afraid you were mistaken.

That's odd. You weren't there, weren't involved in the process, and
couldn't have seen the end result, yet you claim it was art.

I was fortunate enough to have an excellent opinionated art teacher
later in high school who elevated my standards far above what most kids
have today. She taught us to not consider a drawing of a circle on a
stick to be a drawing of a tree ("NO LOLLIPOP TREES!") She also taught
us that major development of artistic skills is crucial.

The current lack of art/music education is a big part of the
look-mommy-i-made-a-poopy "movement" (pun intended).

I'm sticking to my guns. Assembly of pre-existing components, by
itself, is not art.

Note to Jay kadis: I respect you and enjoy your posts. Unlike
stuff@slinkp.com above, I'll withold judgement until I see the end
result. Got a link?

Note to all: When we don't keep standards high, we end up with Ashlee
Simpson...

Mikey Wozniak
Nova Music Productions
this sig is haiku
Anonymous
December 8, 2004 5:32:58 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On 8 Dec 2004 14:03:29 -0800, novamusic@hotmail.com wrote:

> Assembly of pre-existing components, by
>itself, is not art.

Unless it's done by an artist, and then it is.

Checkmate

Al
Anonymous
December 8, 2004 7:36:20 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

<< What about the stuff they play on Hearts of Space? >>



Hmm, no melody, no rhythm, no harmonic development. What is that stuff? The
Krispy Kreme of audio?

Scott Fraser
Anonymous
December 8, 2004 7:40:41 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

<< Assembly is not art. >>



I think you'd get an argument from Marcel Duchamp on that.
I'd say "context is art", but actually the whole discussion of what is or is
not art is one which leads not to edification.

Scott Fraser
Anonymous
December 9, 2004 12:26:45 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Checkmate, my ass. Just because someone "is" an "artist" is no
guarantee of anything. I "am" a "songwriter" and a "recording artist"
as well as an engineer and producer. Does that mean that my morning
excretion is art to you? Can I send you some for review? You pay for
shipping. Paypal accepted.

Mikey Wozniak
Nova Music Productions
this sig is haiku

keeping standards high, even when others don't...
Anonymous
December 9, 2004 12:58:46 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

stuff@slinkp.com wrote:
> G Glass wrote:
> > > Seriously, there's good and and bad in all musical genres. To
say
> there's
> > > no talent in the production of hip hop is really silly. I know a
> couple
> > of
> > ---snip---
> >
> > Hip hop is a "musical" genre? Music implies there's a melody
> present.
>
> Bzzt! False premise. Music implies no such thing.

Only in the sense that it can be copyrighted as a "Musical Composition"
as defined by U.S. Copyright law. In the absence of either melody or
lyrics it's just a recording of instruments and/or voices.
I would therefore assume that rap/hip/hop is copyrighted on the
'lyrics' alone. Or am I missing something ?

RD
Anonymous
December 9, 2004 1:25:48 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

<novamusic@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:1102543408.977405.95190@c13g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
>
>
> I'm sticking to my guns. Assembly of pre-existing components, by
> itself, is not art.
>

I see what you are saying (and partly agree) but it does take talent to make
a compelling composition out of those pre-existing elements. If you don't
believe it, try it.
Anonymous
December 9, 2004 3:35:46 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Try some decaf...

Al

On 8 Dec 2004 21:26:45 -0800, novamusic@hotmail.com wrote:

>Checkmate, my ass. Just because someone "is" an "artist" is no
>guarantee of anything. I "am" a "songwriter" and a "recording artist"
>as well as an engineer and producer. Does that mean that my morning
>excretion is art to you? Can I send you some for review? You pay for
>shipping. Paypal accepted.
>
>Mikey Wozniak
>Nova Music Productions
>this sig is haiku
>
>keeping standards high, even when others don't...
Anonymous
December 9, 2004 10:54:03 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <1102543408.977405.95190@c13g2000cwb.googlegroups.com>,
novamusic@hotmail.com wrote:

[snip]

>
> Note to Jay kadis: I respect you and enjoy your posts. Unlike
> stuff@slinkp.com above, I'll withold judgement until I see the end
> result. Got a link?
>

http://www.davidsinger.com

Unfortuntely he doesn't display the older Fillmore posters including my favorite
of Jesus on the Calvary of junked cars, but he does have a couple of collages on
line.

-Jay
--
x------- Jay Kadis ------- x---- Jay's Attic Studio ------x
x Lecturer, Audio Engineer x Dexter Records x
x CCRMA, Stanford University x http://www.offbeats.com/ x
x---------- http://ccrma.stanford.edu/~jay/ ------------x
Anonymous
December 9, 2004 11:48:36 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

ScotFraser wrote:

> Small,
> yet insignificant royalties have ensued.

Funny! Reminds me of the bad restaurant - expensive, the service is
bad, and the food is too, but at least they don't give you much.
>
> <<Harmonic development is present in much of new age, too. I'd even
go as
> far as to say that harmonic development is the backbone of much New
Age
> music. Subtle sometimes, but there.>>
>
> An awful lot of it is just diatonic noodling, though, with some very
consonant
> (if any) chord changes. My major beef with new age is that they seem
to have an
> abiding fear of dissonance, altered chord voicings or distant
intervallic
> leaps. As Harold Budd said "There's no evil there," & that's where
the interest
> resides, for me at least, in having an element of tension.

Yeah, new age is all about consonance, consonance, consonance. No
tension, because that is the purpose of the music - especially the
early 70's stuff. It's all about soothing the savage beast, and the HOS
stuff does a good job. I think you can get HOS streamed online, no?

I always tell my songwriting students to mix it up with chords &
melody. Bring in the ii, iii, vi, and mutated I,IV,V chords. Send the
melody into the unexpected. Twist things. That's where the secrets are.

> <<Scott, anything happening on "Sun Rings" yet?>>
>
> We mixed a set of excerpts, maybe 2 or 3 minutes from each movement,
a few
> months ago. Haven't heard back about doing full length versions, or
if the
> video guys have synced it all up yet. I guess it's back off the front
burner
> again. I'll send you a CD of the mixes I have.
> Scott Fraser

Cool. The wheels grind slow sometimes... I'm just now getting time to
do my own pop/rock stuff for the 1st time in about 10 years.
Mikey Wozniak
Nova Music Productions
this sig is haiku
Anonymous
December 9, 2004 12:41:18 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Rap artists are true musicians as they express themselves and connect to
people like artists from any genre. They just use the tools that were around
them like any other artist.

Some people get it, some don't.


--

-Hev
find me here:
www.michaelSCREWspringerROBOTS.com
Anonymous
December 9, 2004 1:07:53 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

novamusic@hotmail.com wrote:
> stuff@slinkp.com wrote:
> > novamusic@hotmail.com wrote:
> > > Assembly is not art. Creation is art. Even when I was 8 years
old,
> > and
> > > made a collage from magazine clippings in art class, even then, I
> > knew
> > > that wasn't art.
> >
> > I'm afraid you were mistaken.
>
> That's odd. You weren't there, weren't involved in the process, and
> couldn't have seen the end result, yet you claim it was art.

Apologies. I overstepped my bounds there.

I read your post as implying that because you assessed your own
grade-school collage as "not art", you had therefore concluded
that collage cannot be a medium of art. That is a logical fallacy,
more specifically it is a faulty generalization...
but hey, you were eight, and that's a very common mistake for a kid
to make :-)

If anybody's interested, here's my favorite collage artist:
http://www.lead-to-gold.com/als/

> I'm sticking to my guns. Assembly of pre-existing components, by
> itself, is not art.

Assembly of components is no more or less inherently "art" than
applying paint to a canvas. Art resides primarily in the intentions of
the artist regardless of medium, materials, or process. (Although it's
worth noting that John Cage argued that music resides entirely in the
perception of the listener and that the composer's intentions are
irrelevant... which personally I think is dubious, but this is
a tangent.)

> Note to all: When we don't keep standards high, we end up with Ashlee
> Simpson...

I think that example has more to do with commerce, plain and simple.
She's here purely because she has a famous sister and last name,
one of the most bankable commodities in LA today.
The big problem with Ashlee is not her lack of quality standards,
but rather her lack of creative drive: as far as I can tell,
she's driven only by the desire to A) be famous and B) be recognized as
a distinct person from her sister. She has little interest in being
an artist. If she did, she would be one.

In my view, "standards" are by nature conservative, whereas the
artistic impulse is by nature radical and disruptive. A lot of great
art plays off the tension between the two. But art without standards is
still art, while standards without art are completely worthless, and
art
that merely adheres to standards is generally bland and forgettable.

It's also important to note that generally, the one evolves into the
other. Standards are merely codifications of formerly-radical
innovations.

Examples go back as far in history as we care to look.
Exhibit A: my impression is that nearly anyone who cared about musical
"standards" was appalled by the raucous barbaric so-called music known
to the young upstarts of the day as "jazz". Gradually we got to the
point where jazz is now taught in universities and conservatories
such as the Oberlin conservatory and the Eastman school.


Exhibit B: did you know that there were riots at the premier
of Stravinsky's "The Rite of Spring"?
>From http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stravinksy:
"The music of Le Sacre du Printemps baffles verbal description. To say
that much of it is hideous as sound is a mild description. There is
certainly an impelling rhythm traceable. Practically it has no relation
to music at all as most of us understand the word." Musical Times,
London, August 1, 1913 (Slonimsky, 1953)

This was apparently the majority opinion at the time.
You'd be hard-pressed to find a classical musician or composer today
who
still holds that view.
Anonymous
December 9, 2004 7:31:06 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

<< Strangely enough, tho much of HOS material has little of the above, I
like HOS, simply because they seem to have a great knack for taking the
absolute best of new age stuff - well engineered & produced, for the
most part. It sure does have the intended peace-of-mind effect.>>

Well, I like HOS just fine (though I never hear it here in LA) because I have
some co-writing credits with a friend who gets some serious play on HOS. Small,
yet insignificant royalties have ensued.

<<Harmonic development is present in much of new age, too. I'd even go as
far as to say that harmonic development is the backbone of much New Age
music. Subtle sometimes, but there.>>

An awful lot of it is just diatonic noodling, though, with some very consonant
(if any) chord changes. My major beef with new age is that they seem to have an
abiding fear of dissonance, altered chord voicings or distant intervallic
leaps. As Harold Budd said "There's no evil there," & that's where the interest
resides, for me at least, in having an element of tension.

<<I've been listening to Sheila Chandra lately (Narada label, early
90's), and if that ain't music and art, I ain't breathin'. It's really
world music as opposed to new age, tho.>>

Yeah, she's a lot more interesting than most new age. I think it's because she
comes from a deep native tradition, although I think a lot of her stuff has
gotten too pop. Hey, whatever sells, & she deserves the success she has.


<<Scott, anything happening on "Sun Rings" yet?>>

We mixed a set of excerpts, maybe 2 or 3 minutes from each movement, a few
months ago. Haven't heard back about doing full length versions, or if the
video guys have synced it all up yet. I guess it's back off the front burner
again. I'll send you a CD of the mixes I have.
Scott Fraser
Anonymous
December 9, 2004 10:17:43 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Paul Winkler" wrote:

<thoughtful post snipped>

> Exhibit B: did you know that there were riots at the premier
> of Stravinsky's "The Rite of Spring"?
> >From http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stravinksy:
> "The music of Le Sacre du Printemps baffles verbal description. To say
> that much of it is hideous as sound is a mild description. There is
> certainly an impelling rhythm traceable. Practically it has no relation
> to music at all as most of us understand the word." Musical Times,
> London, August 1, 1913 (Slonimsky, 1953)
>
> This was apparently the majority opinion at the time.
> You'd be hard-pressed to find a classical musician or composer today
> who still holds that view.

Agreed on almost all points. To be fair, though, a lot of what got people
worked up enough to riot at the premier was Nijinsky's choreography which,
aside from being as anti-classical as the music, also had a lot of nudity
and sexuality.

-jw
Anonymous
December 10, 2004 9:30:33 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

philicorda wrote:

> For the high pitched stuff, try something Roland like an sh1000, Sh09 or
> sh101. Their oscs+filters have a clear cutting sound that my SE-1 won't
> do. Roland Alpha Junos are real cheap and even sharper too.

This is a good call.
!