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What is a Hipass filter and...

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Anonymous
December 5, 2004 9:30:22 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

What is a Hipass filter, where might I find one, and can it be used
(like an effects box) on a Korg 16 Track digital recorder (a stand
alone digital HD recorder as opposed to a PC based set up)

Thanks!

More about : hipass filter

Anonymous
December 5, 2004 10:36:20 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Dr. Alan J. Lipman" <dralanlipman@aol.com> wrote in message
news:953100de.0412051830.275fac0f@posting.google.com...
> What is a Hipass filter, where might I find one, and can it be used
> (like an effects box) on a Korg 16 Track digital recorder (a stand
> alone digital HD recorder as opposed to a PC based set up)

A high-pass filter is something that lets high-frequency signals through,
and attenuates the lower-frequency signals. The "treble" control on a
stereo is one sort of high-pass filter.

You can use a graphic equalizer, set with the lower bands turned down and
the higher bands turned up. Or you can use a "parametric equalizer", which
lets you pick a particular frequency point and decide how much you want the
frequencies above (or below, if you choose) to be boosted.

These days practically any effect is available both in hardware (a
standalone box that you plug cables into) and in software (for which you
would need to use a PC). On the Korg, if you use a hardware device, you can
probably play back the one channel, sending its output into the filter, and
then go from the filter's output back into another channel input on the Korg
and record onto a new track.

To figure out what words you sang, concentrate on boosting the frequencies
around 2kHz to 5kHz - that's where a lot of the articulation between
different consonants is. Frequencies much higher than that probably aren't
going to help you hear what's going on.
Anonymous
December 6, 2004 4:09:11 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On 5 Dec 2004 18:30:22 -0800, dralanlipman@aol.com (Dr. Alan J.
Lipman) wrote:

>What is a Hipass filter <snip>

I'm assuming (big assumption) you mean a HIGH PASS filter, not a "hip
ass" filter. By definition, a high pass filter is one which allows
frequencies higher than the "knee" frequency, the set point for
attentuation, to pass unaltered, while everything below that would be
attenuated at a rate of so many dB/octave.

>where might I find one, and can it be used
>(like an effects box) on a Korg 16 Track digital recorder (a stand
>alone digital HD recorder as opposed to a PC based set up) <snip>

Beats the hell outta me anymore!

I used to have a bank of SKL Labs and Krohn-Hite tube bandpass
filters, which I used as sort of a "poor man's parametric" at times.
They all had VERY steep skirts (on the order of 24 dB/octave) and were
had cheaply at electronic surplus outlets in those days, being
military/industrial surplus from outfits like Rocketdyne and Lockheed.
Those days are gone for good, I'm afraid. I'm quite sure, if you're
dealing with digital stuff only, you could do this in software with
whatever equalization algorithm they provide.

dB
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Anonymous
December 6, 2004 5:41:23 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Dr. Alan J. Lipman" <dralanlipman@aol.com> wrote in message
news:953100de.0412051830.275fac0f@posting.google.com
> What is a Hipass filter, where might I find one, and can it be used
> (like an effects box) on a Korg 16 Track digital recorder (a stand
> alone digital HD recorder as opposed to a PC based set up)

I high pass filter is exactly what the words say - its a filter that passes
high frequencies, and by implication does not pass low frequencies.

You can find a wide variety of high pass filters in various audio editing
software. Adobe Audition has a ton of different ones that work different
ways, do different things, and are highly adjustable. It's PC software, but
it probably makes the kinds of changes to the tonality of music that you
want.
Anonymous
December 6, 2004 7:20:40 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Dr. Alan J. Lipman wrote:

> What is a Hipass filter, where might I find one, and can it be used
> (like an effects box) on a Korg 16 Track digital recorder (a stand
> alone digital HD recorder as opposed to a PC based set up)

Before one attempts to describe the medicine you seek to self-prescribe
here, perhaps you could tell us exactly what you wish to accomplish,
what problem you seek to solve.

I've been sneezing more lately and was thinking some elemental brain
sugery, something I could do myself, might help. A doctor friend advised
against it and suggested since I'd been chainsawing cedar for firewood,
perhaps just blowing my nose more often would alleviate my malady.

What do you need to do, Doc?

--
ha
Anonymous
December 6, 2004 7:24:40 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Walter Harley wrote:

> The "treble" control on a stereo is one sort of high-pass filter.

???

--
ha
Anonymous
December 6, 2004 7:33:44 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On Mon, 06 Dec 2004 04:20:40 GMT, walkinay@thegrid.net (hank alrich)
wrote:

>What do you need to do, Doc?

Suture self.
(Is this complements of Firesign Theater? Gotta be.)

Chris Hornbeck
"Shi mian mai fu"
Anonymous
December 6, 2004 1:24:10 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"hank alrich" <walkinay@thegrid.net> wrote in message
news:1goc8kk.1vboj4wycukg0N%walkinay@thegrid.net...
> Walter Harley wrote:
>
>> The "treble" control on a stereo is one sort of high-pass filter.
>
> ???


Sorry, was thinking about Baxandall controls (where the treble is either
high boost or high cut depending on how it's set).

I was trying to give him a sense of "turn the knob up and the highs go up
compared to the lows." You're right, a cut-only bass control ("turn the
knob down and the bass goes down") is a more clear example. Unless it's in
the context of a system with otherwise inflated bass response, like most
systems these days, so that "all the way up" is actually boosting the bass.
Probably tone controls are a bad example in general.

In lieu of a well-defined unity gain point, anything with an overall rising
response can be called a highpass, and anything with an overall falling
response can be called lowpass.
Anonymous
December 6, 2004 2:29:07 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

DeserTBoB wrote:
>
> >What is a Hipass filter <snip>
>
> I'm assuming (big assumption) you mean a HIGH PASS filter, not a "hip
> ass" filter. By definition, a high pass filter is one which allows
> frequencies higher than the "knee" frequency, the set point for
> attentuation, to pass unaltered, while everything below that would be
> attenuated at a rate of so many dB/octave.
>

Yep, ironically a high-pass filter is rarely the hip-ass filter. More
often a low-pass filter with a fair amount of resonance is hipper,
sometimes a band-pass filter as well. The high-pass is more
utilitarian, in my book.

Andrew Leavitt
Anonymous
December 6, 2004 2:31:46 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

DeserTBoB wrote:
>
> >What is a Hipass filter <snip>
>
> I'm assuming (big assumption) you mean a HIGH PASS filter, not a "hip
> ass" filter. By definition, a high pass filter is one which allows
> frequencies higher than the "knee" frequency, the set point for
> attentuation, to pass unaltered, while everything below that would be
> attenuated at a rate of so many dB/octave.
>

Yep, ironically a high-pass filter is rarely the hip-ass filter. More
often a low-pass filter with a fair amount of resonance is hipper,
sometimes a band-pass filter as well. The high-pass is more
utilitarian, in my book.

Andrew Leavitt
Anonymous
December 6, 2004 2:32:50 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

DeserTBoB wrote:
>
> >What is a Hipass filter <snip>
>
> I'm assuming (big assumption) you mean a HIGH PASS filter, not a "hip
> ass" filter. By definition, a high pass filter is one which allows
> frequencies higher than the "knee" frequency, the set point for
> attentuation, to pass unaltered, while everything below that would be
> attenuated at a rate of so many dB/octave.
>

Yep, ironically a high-pass filter is rarely the hip-ass filter. More
often a low-pass filter with a fair amount of resonance is hipper,
sometimes a band-pass filter as well. The high-pass is more
utilitarian, in my book.

Andrew Leavitt
Anonymous
December 6, 2004 4:15:51 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

>> What is a Hipass filter, where might I find one, and can it be used
>> (like an effects box) on a Korg 16 Track digital recorder (a stand
>> alone digital HD recorder as opposed to a PC based set up)
>
> A high-pass filter is something that lets high-frequency signals through,
> and attenuates the lower-frequency signals. The "treble" control on a
> stereo is one sort of high-pass filter.

The BASS control is more accurately a high-pass filter. It can attenuate the
low frequencies and let the highs 'pass.'

The treble control could be called a low-pass filter for the opposite
reason.

But I'm just being picky. I should lurk more. :-)

-John O
Anonymous
December 6, 2004 4:46:31 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On Mon, 06 Dec 2004 13:15:51 GMT, "John O"
<johno@#no^spam&heathkit.com> wrote:

>The BASS control is more accurately a high-pass filter. It can attenuate the
>low frequencies and let the highs 'pass.' <snip>

True through 49.999% of the operable range, but what happenes when you
get bass boost from a Baxandall arrangement?

>The treble control could be called a low-pass filter for the opposite
>reason. <snip>

Again, 49.999% of the time.

>But I'm just being picky. I should lurk more. :-) <snip>

Good point that was 49.999% accurate.

dB
!