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Discussion on Cloud Computing

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December 10, 2010 6:20:20 PM

Recently, I have personally been researching this new 'cloud computing' as what people call it. To my understanding, it has been around for a long time. Maybe I should explain:

Cloud Computing is like a spider web. Everything is connected one-way or another. This 'web' is integrated into an infrastructure called a 'Cloud'. This 'cloud' enables the systems to communicate via hyper text. This is where, I believe, the Internet is the basics of 'Cloud Computing'. First example: Google. The basis behind Google servers are to connect and input commands between 2 servers. Let us say you need to look for Tom's Hardware, but though Google. You connect to Google via HTML with an HTTP. When you send a command, Google takes the stored info, and transfers the needed documentation and sends it to your home server,( home desktop.) This is the basics.

Now, from what I get, this 'Cloud Computing' system will be expanded. Instead of transferring documents from a mainframe server to a desktop, every computer will be part of the server, meaning you desktop will be part of Google...to an extent. Another thing I get at is storing. Today, people store documents with a company through a paid service to store the info on their servers. Microsoft is incorporating this idea in their new OS codenamed: "Windows 8 'Wind' ". The 'wind' system will allow people to store ALL of their partition onto Microsoft servers, and one can only access it though a syntax passcode,(like a password on your desktop icon.) This will allow a sort of 'remote access'.

Microsoft is incorporating this to stop pirators form copying valid Windows disks. I think it goes like this: Connect to the Internet, buy OS at windows store, load it on our server, and access our server with a passcode.


So , my question is, what do YOU think about cloud computing. Is it great, bad, dangerous, silly, terrific, what..........................................
December 10, 2010 10:17:06 PM

This topic has been moved from the section Windows 7 to section Business Computing by Mousemonkey
December 10, 2010 10:22:45 PM

I hate the idea personally. My Internet connection speed hates it almost as much. I can't imagine not being able to update my resume because my wireless is flaky either :lol:  I want local access to all of my files.
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December 11, 2010 1:53:29 AM

personally, I think it is a security issue. An International Security issue. I think we know if everyone stores their personal info on dedicated servers, and their severs are hacked and we cannot control it because the hacker disconnected us from our profile...we are screwed.
December 11, 2010 1:59:16 AM

It is like you have a laptop with less apps to install because you will rely on the "cloud" which you will access to run apps that you need, almost nothing to update (hardware drivers) because when the "cloud" gets updated then everything is new.

Question is what if I live on an area where their is no "cloud" how can I access my files what if I am using a proprietary apps (like security or software that I create). Do we really depend on the "cloud" to control us?

That's the risk - The one who controls the information controls the world.
December 11, 2010 2:04:30 AM

1984....
December 11, 2010 2:36:46 AM

dEAne said:
That's the risk - The one who controls the information controls the world.

With current "cloud' implementations you won't have that problem because everyone has some control over at least some their information, and chooses who to surrender control to. In a universal "cloud" that incorporates all information processing and storage that would undoubtedly be true.
December 11, 2010 3:09:40 AM

randomizer said:
With current "cloud' implementations you won't have that problem because everyone has some control over at least some their information, and chooses who to surrender control to. In a universal "cloud" that incorporates all information processing and storage that would undoubtedly be true.


@Random:

I think what he means is that Microsoft can determine who get what and priority access become limited. Instead of you accessing you hard drive on-hand, Microsoft can determine what is accessed.
December 11, 2010 3:13:56 AM

But that's not the case right now, that's what I'm saying ;) 
December 11, 2010 3:32:10 AM

^ Just wait my friend. It will turn sour in a heart beat.
December 21, 2010 3:56:48 AM

^ That is what an external HDD serves you for. What if they loose your data right before a big presentation?
December 21, 2010 3:58:37 AM

You'll lose more than your data in that case :o 
December 21, 2010 4:01:49 AM

:D  What data...
December 21, 2010 4:12:31 PM

So, what about people who have no broadband internet connections? How do they participate in the "cloud" when it takes minutes or hours to transfer files/docs?

The New Number Two
December 21, 2010 6:13:04 PM

That is also the debate about the Cloud. There are those who don't use the internet or have a dial up service. Considering how pathertic the US Internet and Cyber infastructure is, I would be suprised if Microsoft and Apple decided to go to the cloud in the next-gen of software.

There is also the debate of weather the Gov't should regulate the Cloud. It is called something...but I don't think it is related to net neutrality.
January 13, 2011 1:56:30 AM

I personally think this is a bad idea, like facebook bad. It look shiny and new on the surface, the idea of all your data being stored somewhere else and you don't have to manage data storage yourself. Of course there is no such thing as a mythical "somewhere", everywhere is a location and every bit of readily accessible data must be stored on some form of physical medium in some server facility. This means there will be some group of anonymous (to the data owner) technicians who manage, operate and maintain the servers / data medium that holds your data. They represent the weakest element, they are human and can make mistakes, they have wants needs and desires. They can be purchased or planted, they can have agendas that no one knows about. And as secure as you can make the data storage system, a single insider can make it all meaningless.

Lets make an example case real quick, two competitive companies both looking to bring products to the market that will eventually compete with each other. One of those companies (company A) IT director, in their infinite wisdom decides to do "cloud computing" for their company. They do site surveys, produce reports, present a request for work, get offers and do a full contracting process to determine the cloud service provider that fits them the best. They ensure the provider has a proven track record of data privacy and security. After they complete this their competitor (company B) finds out about it. Company B does research and through public documentation is able to discern the cloud service provider for company A. Now Company B also contacts the cloud service provided looking for cloud service (its the rage after all), during this process they derive a list of possible technicians who work at this company with potential access to data. This isn't hard as they can easily request to speak directly with an engineer about technical questions for implementation and migration, happens all the time. They find the one that can be bought and arrange to have company A's financial / project / market / customer (pick your favorite) data copied and send to them, this can be done anonymously through various file transfer sites.

Now you see the situation company A is now in, their competition has access to their data through corporate espionage, something that happens all the time. That new product company A was going to unload on the market, company B now has all the info on it and can produce a competing product to hit the market at the same time, this would reduce company A's "first to market" advantage. And that is just the tip of the iceberg on the damage that could be wrecked.

Now the counter argument to this is that company B could of just contacted company A's own technicians and done the same thing, and this is true because they do it today. The difference lies in the presence of an anonymous detached disinterested third party. Company A knows its own engineers better then they do some third party's engineers. They have direct access to files and record and can determine who is a potential leak and limit or monitor their access to data. Company A has more control of data managed / stored inside their own systems then they would of that data was managed / stored by a third party.

This works the same way for user data, but now you have unscrupulous people selling your data to interested third party's who will put that data to work for nefarious purposes (identity theft and financial crimes come to mind).
January 13, 2011 3:29:41 AM

@palladin9479
In addition to the last post:

The next security issues is what I have. I will share it, but I don't know if people will use it.

Let us say Company A has stored 850 terabytes worth of encrypted files from users. Okay, everything is secure. All one needs to do is go to a 'clod station', plug in their password and viola. They have access to their documents.

Now here is where it gets hairy.

Suppose someone is at a 'clod station' and finds out about one of the users' pasword. All he needs to do in input the password and he is in. So, how is this different that just going to an isolated desktop? Nothing, but...there is more. Suppose Company A has a dedicated server to Cloud monitoring. Basically, it has the firmware for priority access to the other data servers in the cloud. What a person needs to do is create a profile, or even have a syntax code to priority access to the server,( which, BTW, many peoople can get real easily.) One would not need the code actually as it would be harder to access the Cloud system. All one needs to do is creat a Backdoor program and disguise it to be legitimate. Send it as a standard file on 'you profile'. When the Cloud monitor registers it, the info is sent to a data server. All that virus needs to do is get to one hard drive and isolate teh drive. You have now comfiscates many peoples information. Now, whenm they try tp get ot their 'account', they will be denied of kicked off the 'Cloud System'. When that happens, Techs will be given a siren warning,( theoretically), and systems will notify there is an issue. If the virus is written correctly, it will possibly diable the warning system. The only warning Techs will get is angry customers.

Whulke this is happening, the virus replicates itself in every file. While replicating, it sends the file to the isolated system of the hacker in charge. To prevent loss of conection when IT's find out which server, the virus sends out newly replicated viruses to the next data server and does the same as the original. Until the whole system is contaminated.

If the hacker is smart, he would know not to be open about the attack and prevent the IT;s from disconnecting the servers from the internet. He sets up a hostage system where he controlls all operations. If internet connection is disables the virus will turn begin shutting off the system while destroying files, HDD/SDD serves and have the virus self-destruct before everything is off. Now, no one can know who, what or where the virus came form.

In addition as well, if Company A is being illegaly tapped by Company B, the virus can piggy-back over to Company B's servers and do the same.


Why is this more dangerous than just a isolated desktop?:

A: Because YOU have access to your HDD/SDD. If an attack occurs, you have what it takes to stop it.

Why can't the same virus do this to your isolated desktop?:

A: Simple. Your Destop is a low priority server. If the system is infected with the virus as stated above, your desktop will not respond the same way as the servers stated above.

Why don't the Cloud servers have anit-malware software? Can't anyone detect the attack.

A: They should. there is no law or regulation that I know of that says they need one. If they do, the code must be written in advance inside the server for execution to occur. The attack will occur form the inside, and info will be retrieved form the outside. If the attwacker is smart, hw will pipeline teh info to another server and prevent his locating form being discovered.

Why are we so concerned about 'Cloud Computing'?

A: It is a new topic. The Internet itself is NOT that secure. Giving your sensitive info to someone you don't know is dangerous. It is like giving your best freind your Social Security Card, and trusting him to protect it.
January 13, 2011 7:36:55 PM

Cloud Computing is here to stay. It is very effective, very secure, cost effective, and most 'bad' opinions in this thread are based off a lack of understanding of what it really is.

Most people know what the cloud is, like in this thread. Very few people really even know how it works.

I'm sure I could pose the question, "How does the internet work?" and people will come back and explain it to me. Sure, they think it'll be a pretty good explanation just like what others have explained the 'Cloud' to be. Ask a Cisco Engineer to explain the internet and they will tell you it is one of the hardest things to explain and most people truly have no clue.

Security by obscurity. The less people who really know the backend, the safer it is.
January 13, 2011 7:42:07 PM

I think it is centralization that people are afraid of. Having all of their information all in a pool with everyone able to access it with a 'theoretical' command. Sure, the Internet is a centralized database, but we have our information isolated. Here is the idea:

Let's say that a person had the flu. If everyone was in the same room, they would possibly get infected.

Now, if that same person was out in public, the chance of everyone getting it is smaller.

It is theory of course. i see how clouds computing is easier and efficient, but I think safety, not security, is a priority.
January 14, 2011 2:00:55 AM

Companies have been storing data at central servers for ages, its nothing new. Companies have even been storing data at remote servers for years, this data is usually web / low-priority data but can be more depending. In both scenarios the company has administrative control over its data, the location and the security context around that data.

Using "cloud computing" for data storage removes that administrative control and security context. Your data is now mixed in with lots of other people's data that is stored and spread out amongst a large geographical area. Because its not longer under your administrative control it is vulnerable to third party espionage along with whatever security vulnerabilities are present with the controller. Security is done in layers with each layer serving to delay the attacker. Given in infinite amount of time any security system can be broken, thus we must ensure that any attack would take longer then the detection time of the system. And the layer that takes the longest to bypass isn't some automated system or protocol, its the human working inside the company. You greatest threat isn't from the outside, its from the insider working against you.
January 14, 2011 4:32:23 AM

...so, It will be harder for us as legitimate users to retrieve our data then? Just a thought.
January 14, 2011 6:49:06 AM

palladin9479 said:
And the layer that takes the longest to bypass isn't some automated system or protocol, its the human working inside the company. You greatest threat isn't from the outside, its from the insider working against you.

Humans are usually require the shortest time to bypass, not the longest. A quick phone call from the "boss" or the "head of IT" can be all you need to have sensitive information leaked by an employee who doesn't know any better (and who never read the company's security policies).

dogman_1234 said:
...so, It will be harder for us as legitimate users to retrieve our data then? Just a thought.

Unlikely. The providers that companies sign up with would have SLAs to meet considering the likely amount of money involved. For end users you're more likely to get shafted for some time in the unlikely event of a problem because plebs paying a few hundred dollars a year will never get priority support over a company paying $2 million a year.
January 14, 2011 7:02:11 AM

randomizer said:



Unlikely. The providers that companies sign up with would have SLAs to meet considering the likely amount of money involved. For end users you're more likely to get shafted for some time in the unlikely event of a problem because plebs paying a few hundred dollars a year will never get priority support over a company paying $2 million a year.



I guess you're right. Pay the guy more, it will make him consider the safety of others.
January 14, 2011 8:46:53 AM

My first objection is lack of internet access. I work in a part of the world where internet access is relatively expensive, only relatively reliable, and censored - Saudi Arabia.

Second objection is lack of security. I'm sorry, Riser. "Security by obscurity" is not a valid approach to security. Ask any security expert.

My third objection is purely personal. I have no desire to go back to the '60's where everyone had terminals (clients) and a computer service center (server). All we are doing is swapping dumb terminals for intelligent terminals and a service center down the street in that red brick building for a server somewhere in the sky. I have lived through the first and I do not want to go back.
January 14, 2011 12:27:39 PM

Really? Ask IBM with their AS400 and i520 systems. The only true operating system to have never been hacked.

It is far easier to store all of ones' data in a central location and secure that single point than everyone having a personal PC where they can save data. You can only do a reasonable job in securing all those, yet you can do a great job in securing a central location.

In a cloud world, I can request to have my own physical equipment that no other companies have access to. That's far more secure than anything else. Walk into a Sunguard and good luck trying to get access to a secure room.

Cloud computing isn't for everyone. It requires a highly connected user base. The cost savings compared to maintaining all that equipment is a strong enough reason to go the cloud route. You can maintain the software while another group maintains the hardware. It is an ideal situation.

This isn't moving backwards to the 60s. Technology is finally catching up. For a while we had to move resources out to the PC because we lacked the data bandwidth. With the bandwidth available and servers being far more powerful and capable than ever before, the data can be maintained in a central location more secure than anything else.

If you're against it, it is because you don't understand all the aspects of it. There is reason why it is becoming extremely popular around the world. It works.
January 14, 2011 6:27:00 PM

riser said:
This isn't moving backwards to the 60s. Technology is finally catching up. For a while we had to move resources out to the PC because we lacked the data bandwidth. With the bandwidth available and servers being far more powerful and capable than ever before, the data can be maintained in a central location more secure than anything else.


I suspect you're not from the USA, Riser? Most people in this country don't have broadband Internet at home. Less than half. Broadband Internet is not even available in my neighborhood. The "cloud" isn't going to happen until this situation is resolved.

The New Number Two
January 14, 2011 7:32:22 PM

I'm in the USA and the cloud has been happening. Companies all over the world are using the cloud. Home users are using the cloud.

Is it mainstream in every household? Not at all. Many home users won't have much need for it right now.

Do you use Google Apps? Cloud based.

Microsoft Office has been moving to Cloud based as well to help home users out.

If you look at it purely from a consumer area, it may not be needed. Companies are the ones who are driving the technology. I work for a Fortune 500 company and we have several cloud based applications and this year we plan on adding more.
January 15, 2011 12:36:55 AM

My previous post was not well- stated; I apologize for that and I'll try to clear it up.

Many people are claiming that "cloud computing" is going to make local data/app storage obsolete, and our data/apps will no longer reside on our desktops. My intended point was that this can't happen until more people have a decent Internet connection, because too many will be left in the cold.

The New Number Two
January 18, 2011 1:28:32 AM

Quote:
Humans are usually require the shortest time to bypass, not the longest. A quick phone call from the "boss" or the "head of IT" can be all you need to have sensitive information leaked by an employee who doesn't know any better (and who never read the company's security policies).


Your omitting how long it took to find the required information and to develop the plan to breach the human security layer. Once a system vulnerability is found a script or other automated task can bypass it at near-instant speed then retrieve the data and get out before IDS kicks in. Getting the information to know where the data is stored and the internal architecture are the hard part. You can't just pick up the phone and start cold-calling places to ferret up that information, this isn't the movies where some suave protagonist talks some simpleton into handing over the company secrets via a single phone call. Anyone with actual knowledge of how the internals work is typically smart enough to realize how dangerous that knowledge is, otherwise their just parroting what they overheard over some water-cooler talk.

Cloud computing is only being used as a buzz-word, its the latest in marketing lingo similar to "blogging" and twitter. How many companies setup a "blog" that was nothing but a company ad page with a different name.
January 19, 2011 4:12:38 PM

I wouldn't think of the cloud as something for home users. I would only put it into the business world until the technology advanced far enough that it would really benefit the mass home user.
January 19, 2011 5:54:39 PM

^ tell that to Microsoft.
January 20, 2011 2:04:51 PM

They have to start somewhere in order to break into the market...
January 27, 2011 2:41:18 AM

IBM now building a "cloud" datacenter in China.

http://www.tomshardware.com/news/ibm-data-center-cloud-...

So now instead of having to bribe some technician in a *cloud* data center to copy your competitors data for you, instead you have to worry about the Chinese government stealing your data and using it to create Chinese branded copies of your products. There are no IP laws inside China and no one to goto for legal action against companies using your IP to create Chinese products. So yes, please store your latest unreleased product designs inside this place.

Next thing you know, they will have the iPone 5 out before Apple released their iPhone 5 to market.
January 27, 2011 3:29:19 AM

This discussion has to be more well rounded. I cannot take the fact everyone is on one side.

For the cloud to work, there needs to be regulation,( non gov't) to take action to protect data of the user(s). No one wants to find out a company let loose or allowed their sensitive data like bank statements go loose into the International Network.
January 27, 2011 4:03:24 AM

And exactly how do you expect that will happen? The very definition of "cloud computing" is that you don't know exactly where your data physically resides. Your not supposed to care because the "cloud" magically takes care of it for you. This may work for some users emails to grandma, or some letters / university work or even youtube like videos your share with people, but this will not work for anything sensitive. No matter how you spin it, the moment the data leaves the administrative control of its owners then it is vulnerable to theft.

Now this doesn't preclude the concepts of "cloud computing" from being used inside an enterprise. A company may setup its own form of cloud computing between different sites, all under the companies control. Or a data storage company can use "cloud computing" between its own sites as a form of distributed storage. The client companies would encrypt their data using strong encryption and just use the storage company as remote storage space. In this case the client company keeps the keys and does the encryption / decryption on their own system then export the files as encrypted bulk data to the off site storage. In this method if someone steals your bulk data they won't be able to decrypt it in any reasonably amount of time. You can not trust the cloud sites to do the encryption / decryption, their keys are just as vulnerable as your bulk data.
January 27, 2011 4:30:55 PM

China itself will need its own cloud data center for all their information. You can get SLAs to know exactly where your data is located. You can have it spread across two data centers, ten centers, etc. Whatever you want.

Seriously, this thread has turned into a lot of speculation without facts and jumping to conclusions. Do your due diligence before posting personal opinions on how it works or at least back your claims up with real facts.
January 27, 2011 9:21:07 PM

I do at least. I have still to further contemplate the basic users advantage of it though!
January 28, 2011 12:30:28 AM

Quote:
You can get SLAs to know exactly where your data is located.


Then it is no longer "cloud computing" and is just off site data storage. Similar to how you would outsource your data storage to a data center provider.

Really people need to stop using "cloud computing" as a buzzword, the very concept of it means you don't manage the specifics and instead trust those specifics to a collection of entity's. Its the next evolution of distributed computing, something we've been doing for decades.

If you think otherwise, then provide the technical differences not marketing buzz words.
January 28, 2011 12:55:44 AM

I have a better name, "Data Management System Protocol"

DMSP.
January 28, 2011 2:06:58 AM

We could just use Ceph to store / replicate our data

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ceph

The entire design is such that the data can be in multiple places at the same time and no single location can cause a loss of data. It still technically "experimental" but is a pretty insane way to go about storage and replication of data. Just apply local encryption prior to the data going out the door and *poof* you can create your own "cloud computing" data storage service.
March 7, 2011 1:43:45 AM

I keep thinking of Cloud techology as Xeon Cluster Server Computers in Aerospace Compunds where those Western Digital Velo-Raptors are spinning at 20,000 RPM's. It seems like its those Servers enhancing everyone's computers like a CO-Proccessor , maybe to speed up VM Ware Computing or Citrix Metaframe Link-ups! I wish there was a certififcation literally for every piece of new technology sometimes who cares about reading 300 pages and certifying in specific topics?
March 7, 2011 11:57:36 AM

As I've said before "cloud computing" is just the current market buzz word being thrown around. It can be used to describe ~any~ web service with a redundant / load balanced structure. hotmail / gmail are technically "cloud computing based personal communication management services". Xdrive.com is "cloud computing enhanced personal data management services". AIM / MSN Live is "cloud computing collaboration based services".

See nearly any service can be attributed the world "cloud computing" with a little creative writing skills. Tomshardware can be "unidirectional global IT information updating and collaboration services, enhanced through cloud computing".

Its nothing new, just old techniques polished under a new name.
March 7, 2011 5:31:31 PM

The Internet, back in the 1960's when it was the ARPANET, was a cloud based protocol developed by DARPA. Yes, we have has CC for over 50 years now.
March 8, 2011 2:29:17 PM

Yep DARPA designed it that way so that the soviets wouldn't take down the national military communications network with only a few strikes. Which just goes to underscore my point all alone, that "Cloud Computing" is nothing but a marketing buzz word used to sell "new" generation of products to Corporate IT managers. Its also used by middle management everywhere as bullet style statements on their own efficiency reports.
March 27, 2011 5:25:14 PM

dogman_1234 said:
bad, dangerous, silly.

To put it mildly, that is what I think of cloud computing. I don't want to store all my disc on Microsoft's servers, nor anybody else's for that matter. Because it is true if you want things done right then do it yourself. If I stored everything somewhere not near me then what happens when their servers crash, etc? All are my files and configurations gone? Like you said though, you would mostly likely store documents, photos, videos, and more, but if it went further than that it would not be a enjoyable site to see.
March 27, 2011 7:30:46 PM

dogman_1234 said:
Recently, I have personally been researching this new 'cloud computing' as what people call it. To my understanding, it has been around for a long time. Maybe I should explain:

Cloud Computing is like a spider web. Everything is connected one-way or another. This 'web' is integrated into an infrastructure called a 'Cloud'. This 'cloud' enables the systems to communicate via hyper text. This is where, I believe, the Internet is the basics of 'Cloud Computing'. First example: Google. The basis behind Google servers are to connect and input commands between 2 servers. Let us say you need to look for Tom's Hardware, but though Google. You connect to Google via HTML with an HTTP. When you send a command, Google takes the stored info, and transfers the needed documentation and sends it to your home server,( home desktop.) This is the basics.

Now, from what I get, this 'Cloud Computing' system will be expanded. Instead of transferring documents from a mainframe server to a desktop, every computer will be part of the server, meaning you desktop will be part of Google...to an extent. Another thing I get at is storing. Today, people store documents with a company through a paid service to store the info on their servers. Microsoft is incorporating this idea in their new OS codenamed: "Windows 8 'Wind' ". The 'wind' system will allow people to store ALL of their partition onto Microsoft servers, and one can only access it though a syntax passcode,(like a password on your desktop icon.) This will allow a sort of 'remote access'.

Microsoft is incorporating this to stop pirators form copying valid Windows disks. I think it goes like this: Connect to the Internet, buy OS at windows store, load it on our server, and access our server with a passcode.



On a SIde Note noticed you put Chapter 15 with Comptia did a google search for Chapter 15 and all it shows is different options Dead Space 2 (NecroMorphs), and Immigrants and Urbanization notes which sounds like Assimiliation after the Necromorphs in Outerspace! Any specific reference to chapter 15 that you meant?


So , my question is, what do YOU think about cloud computing. Is it great, bad, dangerous, silly, terrific, what..........................................

March 27, 2011 7:40:43 PM

dogman_1234 said:
@palladin9479
In addition to the last post:

The next security issues is what I have. I will share it, but I don't know if people will use it.

Let us say Company A has stored 850 terabytes worth of encrypted files from users. Okay, everything is secure. All one needs to do is go to a 'clod station', plug in their password and viola. They have access to their documents.

Now here is where it gets hairy.

Suppose someone is at a 'clod station' and finds out about one of the users' pasword. All he needs to do in input the password and he is in. So, how is this different that just going to an isolated desktop? Nothing, but...there is more. Suppose Company A has a dedicated server to Cloud monitoring. Basically, it has the firmware for priority access to the other data servers in the cloud. What a person needs to do is create a profile, or even have a syntax code to priority access to the server,( which, BTW, many peoople can get real easily.) One would not need the code actually as it would be harder to access the Cloud system. All one needs to do is creat a Backdoor program and disguise it to be legitimate. Send it as a standard file on 'you profile'. When the Cloud monitor registers it, the info is sent to a data server. All that virus needs to do is get to one hard drive and isolate teh drive. You have now comfiscates many peoples information. Now, whenm they try tp get ot their 'account', they will be denied of kicked off the 'Cloud System'. When that happens, Techs will be given a siren warning,( theoretically), and systems will notify there is an issue. If the virus is written correctly, it will possibly diable the warning system. The only warning Techs will get is angry customers.

Whulke this is happening, the virus replicates itself in every file. While replicating, it sends the file to the isolated system of the hacker in charge. To prevent loss of conection when IT's find out which server, the virus sends out newly replicated viruses to the next data server and does the same as the original. Until the whole system is contaminated.

If the hacker is smart, he would know not to be open about the attack and prevent the IT;s from disconnecting the servers from the internet. He sets up a hostage system where he controlls all operations. If internet connection is disables the virus will turn begin shutting off the system while destroying files, HDD/SDD serves and have the virus self-destruct before everything is off. Now, no one can know who, what or where the virus came form.

In addition as well, if Company A is being illegaly tapped by Company B, the virus can piggy-back over to Company B's servers and do the same.


Why is this more dangerous than just a isolated desktop?:

A: Because YOU have access to your HDD/SDD. If an attack occurs, you have what it takes to stop it.

Why can't the same virus do this to your isolated desktop?:

A: Simple. Your Destop is a low priority server. If the system is infected with the virus as stated above, your desktop will not respond the same way as the servers stated above.

Why don't the Cloud servers have anit-malware software? Can't anyone detect the attack.

A: They should. there is no law or regulation that I know of that says they need one. If they do, the code must be written in advance inside the server for execution to occur. The attack will occur form the inside, and info will be retrieved form the outside. If the attwacker is smart, hw will pipeline teh info to another server and prevent his locating form being discovered.

Why are we so concerned about 'Cloud Computing'?

A: It is a new topic. The Internet itself is NOT that secure. Giving your sensitive info to someone you don't know is dangerous. It is like giving your best freind your Social Security Card, and trusting him to protect it.



Another Question is What Speed of Xeon-CPU with Level-3 Cache/Amount do you need to Compete with Speed of Itanium 2-CPU with Level-4 Cache/Amount? That seems like a major Q in Cloud Computing because you can put more Xeon Cores a Die than Itanium-2 and Scale Xeon to a Higher Frequency? Xeon with LVL-3 looks a true 64bit architecture and Itanium 2 with Level-4 looks to have the potential of a true 128bit architecture! Itanium to me is newer than a Xeon with LVL-3 Cache!

When you Think of Similar Chips why not Take an Athlon FX-60/Pentium-D Xeon and add Level 4 cache since it is a less complex chip ,and can probably scale higher in Frequency than Itanium-2, and more mutli-proccessor dies on one core than an Itanium-2 Chip which is more complex it seems due to Have problems scaling in MHZ and Delays!

Many Intermediant Solutions in IT, Until you get your new architecture out!
March 31, 2011 8:24:59 AM

@GunBladeType-T,

Your throwing around marketing slang without stopping to think about it. For starters you can not compare a Xeon (x86) with an Itanium (VLIW), the Itanium loses bad on anything that isn't specifically optimized for it. It would be better to use a SPARC or an IBM Power to run your enterprise applications then to use an Itanium. Xeon's "64 bit architecture" is just EMT64 which Intel license's from AMD. 64-bit Architectures have been around since the late 80's early 90's, just lookup UltraSparc for a prime example.

Ignore the statements being thrown around about cache, after L2 cache really starts to be less of an issue. You can throw gobs of memory and die space at the problem, or you can just design a better prediction / fetching method. VLIW architectures are forced to do the first because they are incapable of doing branch prediction, there are better ways to do general computing.

The rest of your post seems garbled and a cross between a hyper 10yr old and a tech head on red bull.
March 31, 2011 3:40:40 PM

palladin9479 said:
@GunBladeType-T,

Your throwing around marketing slang without stopping to think about it. For starters you can not compare a Xeon (x86) with an Itanium (VLIW), the Itanium loses bad on anything that isn't specifically optimized for it. It would be better to use a SPARC or an IBM Power to run your enterprise applications then to use an Itanium. Xeon's "64 bit architecture" is just EMT64 which Intel license's from AMD. 64-bit Architectures have been around since the late 80's early 90's, just lookup UltraSparc for a prime example.

Ignore the statements being thrown around about cache, after L2 cache really starts to be less of an issue. You can throw gobs of memory and die space at the problem, or you can just design a better prediction / fetching method. VLIW architectures are forced to do the first because they are incapable of doing branch prediction, there are better ways to do general computing.

The rest of your post seems garbled and a cross between a hyper 10yr old and a tech head on red bull.


1) The way you think is un professional! If you License that Level 4 Cache and put it on an architcture it makes a big difference! Go Online and do some research; Level Cache makes a Big Difference Level 3 Cache vs. L-2 Cache at sometimes 20X or 2,000%! Imagine Putting some Level 3 Cache, Than Level-4 Cache on an Athlon FX or a Pentium D which are simpler architectures, than AMD's Orochi-Bulldowzer or Westermire-EX Xeon Proccessors! Easier to start with Simpler Older architectures and get it to 90% Working Silicon Wafers with only 10% defective!
Its Better to work on each area of the Proccessor or Instead of branch Prediction and Olive Trees think about a Hex-Memory Controllers! As you scale with a higher number of stages like the P-IV which was 38 stages in the pipeline branch prediction is more important if you a have a cache misfire! Level-3 Cache helps with that and Level-4 Cache which is more complex L-1/L-2 isn't that complex!

2)I know Itannium was a big Project For Intel it could scale that high but it has level 4 Cache if you can get that to scale as high as a Xeon or Operaton(Athlon FX) It might be able to knock them out, Intel has had problems scaling Itanium! More Xeons/Operatons on a Die is possibe than Itanium!
Level 3 Cache 12.0GHZ vs. 72GHZ L-2 Cache Depreciated L-2 Architectures and made them uneffcient!

3) Licensing with AMD leads to other Deals also, you license with them they license with you and leads to new innovations! Ultra-Spark I am familiar with it and is a different architecture and design team, meaning new creativity on R&D and maybe new solutions! :hello: 
March 31, 2011 3:55:16 PM

palladin9479 said:
As I've said before "cloud computing" is just the current market buzz word being thrown around. It can be used to describe ~any~ web service with a redundant / load balanced structure. hotmail / gmail are technically "cloud computing based personal communication management services". Xdrive.com is "cloud computing enhanced personal data management services". AIM / MSN Live is "cloud computing collaboration based services".

See nearly any service can be attributed the world "cloud computing" with a little creative writing skills. Tomshardware can be "unidirectional global IT information updating and collaboration services, enhanced through cloud computing".

Its nothing new, just old techniques polished under a new name.


I keep thinking Wireless Cloud Computing is going to be the Next upgrade to Wired Clustered Servers! Clouds and AeroSpace Sattellites vs. Wired BNC/Fiberoptic/GG-45 Connections! Meaning relying more on Wireless Gateways than Bridges/Proxy Servers/Routers! Thats how old Cluster Server Computing sounds to me days of the mainframes like 1970's Shadowrun/Blade Runner era vs 2010 Technology and 40 years newer AeroSpace Techology and Outer Space!
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