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Does anybody here record drums one by one for more punch

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December 12, 2004 1:04:07 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

I hear in many modern-day recordings songs sounding like the drums are
so isolated but not so much that they're programmed. They still sound
live and all but the cymbals are so big and in your face without
sounding like there's any snare in the overheads. The snare sounds
different every time it hits but no cymbal bleed behind it in the
centre. Overall, the drums sound like they are all live but so
polished that there's no way gating or anything like that could get it
to sound so punchy and seperated.

My question is, could this be the result of the drummer recording the
snare, kick and cymbals seperately? Such a technique makes sense to me
in my head but since I've never tried it I wouldn't know how realistic
the resulting sound would be.

Any comments are welcome.

Thanks,
Dave

More about : record drums punch

Anonymous
December 12, 2004 4:13:16 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Sometimes people replace a particular drum track with a sampled one, or mix
them together. I'm sure some recording engineer/producers have been
recording individual drums tracks on particular projects since the beginning
of multi-tracking.
However, I would point out that playing a drum kit is a 'whole body thing'
and that the quality and feel of drum tracks can really suffer as a result
if one is not careful. A really talented musician can do it, but the result
it qualitatively different. Just be aware of that difference is all I'm
suggesting.

Skler


"David" <david_m76@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:f020f618.0412121004.d5519fb@posting.google.com...
> I hear in many modern-day recordings songs sounding like the drums are
> so isolated but not so much that they're programmed. They still sound
> live and all but the cymbals are so big and in your face without
> sounding like there's any snare in the overheads. The snare sounds
> different every time it hits but no cymbal bleed behind it in the
> centre. Overall, the drums sound like they are all live but so
> polished that there's no way gating or anything like that could get it
> to sound so punchy and seperated.
>
> My question is, could this be the result of the drummer recording the
> snare, kick and cymbals seperately? Such a technique makes sense to me
> in my head but since I've never tried it I wouldn't know how realistic
> the resulting sound would be.
>
> Any comments are welcome.
>
> Thanks,
> Dave
Anonymous
December 12, 2004 6:50:57 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

yup. i'm not entirely sure of the reasons people do this. i think
it's partly a sound they're going for.

but for instance, i was told by someone in the band that the new
ministry record has all the drums recorded this way. if i see him
again, i'll ask more questions. i was in the middle of a session at
the time.

-tE

* Tony Espinoza

SF SOUNDWORKS
http://sfsoundworks.com
415.503.1110 vox
----------------------------------------------------------
Featuring the only SSL 9000 in San Francisco

Check out the latest article in Mix Magazine!
see link at http://sfsoundworks.com

David wrote:
> I hear in many modern-day recordings songs sounding like the drums
are
> so isolated but not so much that they're programmed. They still sound
> live and all but the cymbals are so big and in your face without
> sounding like there's any snare in the overheads. The snare sounds
> different every time it hits but no cymbal bleed behind it in the
> centre. Overall, the drums sound like they are all live but so
> polished that there's no way gating or anything like that could get
it
> to sound so punchy and seperated.
>
> My question is, could this be the result of the drummer recording the
> snare, kick and cymbals seperately? Such a technique makes sense to
me
> in my head but since I've never tried it I wouldn't know how
realistic
> the resulting sound would be.
>
> Any comments are welcome.
>
> Thanks,
> Dave
Related resources
Anonymous
December 12, 2004 9:11:10 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

I think that much of the separation you hear in those recordings might be
the result of really good miking techniques and good engineering and mixing.
The use of supercardiod microphones and noise gates helps with bleed-in when
spot-miking, and good use of EQ and compression during mixing integrates
everything so that each instrument is visible in the mix but the kit also
works naturally as a single instrument.

In other instances it's the result of triggering, where the drummer plays a
real kit but what is recorded are impulses from triggers attached to those
drums -- those impulses are used to trigger samples in a drum machine or in
the computer. Then the overhead mics are mixed in with the triggered sounds
to add the cymbals and room sound. OFten triggering is employed in addition
to miking the individual drums and the triggered and acoustic sounds are
blended together. This is done a lot in metal music where each drum hit is
supposed to kick you in the head but it still can't sound like a drum
machine.

There are also some pretty impressive velocity-sensitive multisampled drum
kits out there that can be sequenced -- you can get great results out of
them if you know learn how to use them and how to work within the
limitations of the technology.

Tim




"David" <david_m76@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:f020f618.0412121004.d5519fb@posting.google.com...
>I hear in many modern-day recordings songs sounding like the drums are
> so isolated but not so much that they're programmed. They still sound
> live and all but the cymbals are so big and in your face without
> sounding like there's any snare in the overheads. The snare sounds
> different every time it hits but no cymbal bleed behind it in the
> centre. Overall, the drums sound like they are all live but so
> polished that there's no way gating or anything like that could get it
> to sound so punchy and seperated.
>
> My question is, could this be the result of the drummer recording the
> snare, kick and cymbals seperately? Such a technique makes sense to me
> in my head but since I've never tried it I wouldn't know how realistic
> the resulting sound would be.
>
> Any comments are welcome.
>
> Thanks,
> Dave
>
Anonymous
December 13, 2004 12:53:26 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"David" <david_m76@hotmail.com> wrote in message news:f020f618.0412121004.d5519fb@posting.google.com...
> I hear in many modern-day recordings songs sounding like the drums are
> so isolated but not so much that they're programmed. They still sound
> live and all but the cymbals are so big and in your face without
> sounding like there's any snare in the overheads.

You mean, without 'appearing' to sound as if there's an abundance
of snare in the overheads... If it's mixed well enough to present a
good picture of the drum set as a 'whole'... and then placed into the
mix appropriately, how would you know for sure?

> The snare sounds
> different every time it hits but no cymbal bleed behind it in the
> centre.

You mean, you cannot readily *detect* that cymbals are present in the
area of the snare drum... (same explanation as above).

> Overall, the drums sound like they are all live but so
> polished that there's no way gating or anything like that could get it
> to sound so punchy and seperated.

If the kit is recorded live, that's called adequate recording experience
and above all, a good drummer and a well tuned kit. The area the kit
is recorded in also plays a bigger role than most would assume.

Gates can work wonders to isolate, but I despise them. Compression
can do a variety of little tricks, but I dislike the results for the most part.

"Punchy", is a well tuned drum kit played by an experienced drummer.
It's also knowing where the drum kit should sit in a mix based on the
genre'. It's easy to make a great recording of drums and then bury it
in the mix so as to make them sound like little more than cardboard
boxes.

"Separation" is taking a relatively accurate picture of the drum kits parts
and then reassembling it so as to make it a cohesive whole; balanced
and separated as necessary to fit the into the mix appropriately. Some
people can do this with minimal miking, others mic nearly everything.
Personally, I find it more difficult to mix a drum kit tracked with only three
mics than to mix a kit that was close miked, almost without regard for
how poorly the tracks may have been recorded.

> My question is, could this be the result of the drummer recording the
> snare, kick and cymbals seperately?

I sincerely doubt it, though 'sampled' sounds are often layered onto
the original drum tracks which can be ellusive to detect.

> Such a technique makes sense to me
> in my head but since I've never tried it I wouldn't know how realistic
> the resulting sound would be.

Probably pretty nasty.

You happen to be striking a sorta' sour note with me, since I was just
recently flown to Montana to mix a western swing album wherein the
amateur recordist failed in his attempts to record the entire drumkit, as
he was afraid of the 'bleed' between tracks. As a result of this fear and
inexperience, he went back and re-tracked all of the parts seperately
with only a couple of small exceptions. Putting them back together
again, with any semblance of cohesion, was probably the biggest
turd I have ever had to polish. Don't get me wrng, the songs were
good and so were the other players. But on this record, the drums
simply had to take the back seat.

The results were a mishmosh of out of tempo, bad sounding tracks with
little on no 'feeling' at all left in them... certainly no "groove" what-so-ever.

Every mistake an amateur could possibly have made, this recordist
made with great flair, on each and every single track that he had
subsequently re-recorded.... down to miking the ride cymbal with
a 414 from about three inches away. (I never knew there was quite
so much low end in a ride cymbal). Since he also recorded everything
totally flat, it was difficult to find enough EQ to carve out a semi-smooth
sounding cymbal.

> Any comments are welcome.

In general, no... I don't think this is an accepted practice at all, and
I would certainly *never* recommend it. It's bad enough when the
drums as a whole are recorded separately from the main rhythm
section, let alone each piece independently. I can't even imagine
finding a drummer who would agree with such a suggestion.

--
David Morgan (MAMS)
http://www.m-a-m-s DOT com
Morgan Audio Media Service
Dallas, Texas (214) 662-9901
_______________________________________
http://www.artisan-recordingstudio.com
Anonymous
December 13, 2004 12:53:27 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

I had a great drummer in my studio a while back and asked him to try such a
technique as an experiment for both of us. He couldn't do it easily. It's
like learning to play the drums all over again to some degree. An analogy
might be like asking a guitar player to play a song he's intimately familiar
with but only using the "d" & "g" strings for a pass. Possible but
uncomfortable until you've done it for a while.

Neil R

"David Morgan (MAMS)" <mams@NOSPAm-a-m-s.com> wrote in message
news:q53vd.3919$N%6.1409@trnddc05...
>
> "David" <david_m76@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> news:f020f618.0412121004.d5519fb@posting.google.com...
>> I hear in many modern-day recordings songs sounding like the drums are
>> so isolated but not so much that they're programmed. They still sound
>> live and all but the cymbals are so big and in your face without
>> sounding like there's any snare in the overheads.
>
> You mean, without 'appearing' to sound as if there's an abundance
> of snare in the overheads... If it's mixed well enough to present a
> good picture of the drum set as a 'whole'... and then placed into the
> mix appropriately, how would you know for sure?
>
>> The snare sounds
>> different every time it hits but no cymbal bleed behind it in the
>> centre.
>
> You mean, you cannot readily *detect* that cymbals are present in the
> area of the snare drum... (same explanation as above).
>
>> Overall, the drums sound like they are all live but so
>> polished that there's no way gating or anything like that could get it
>> to sound so punchy and seperated.
>
> If the kit is recorded live, that's called adequate recording experience
> and above all, a good drummer and a well tuned kit. The area the kit
> is recorded in also plays a bigger role than most would assume.
>
> Gates can work wonders to isolate, but I despise them. Compression
> can do a variety of little tricks, but I dislike the results for the most
> part.
>
> "Punchy", is a well tuned drum kit played by an experienced drummer.
> It's also knowing where the drum kit should sit in a mix based on the
> genre'. It's easy to make a great recording of drums and then bury it
> in the mix so as to make them sound like little more than cardboard
> boxes.
>
> "Separation" is taking a relatively accurate picture of the drum kits
> parts
> and then reassembling it so as to make it a cohesive whole; balanced
> and separated as necessary to fit the into the mix appropriately. Some
> people can do this with minimal miking, others mic nearly everything.
> Personally, I find it more difficult to mix a drum kit tracked with only
> three
> mics than to mix a kit that was close miked, almost without regard for
> how poorly the tracks may have been recorded.
>
>> My question is, could this be the result of the drummer recording the
>> snare, kick and cymbals seperately?
>
> I sincerely doubt it, though 'sampled' sounds are often layered onto
> the original drum tracks which can be ellusive to detect.
>
>> Such a technique makes sense to me
>> in my head but since I've never tried it I wouldn't know how realistic
>> the resulting sound would be.
>
> Probably pretty nasty.
>
> You happen to be striking a sorta' sour note with me, since I was just
> recently flown to Montana to mix a western swing album wherein the
> amateur recordist failed in his attempts to record the entire drumkit, as
> he was afraid of the 'bleed' between tracks. As a result of this fear and
> inexperience, he went back and re-tracked all of the parts seperately
> with only a couple of small exceptions. Putting them back together
> again, with any semblance of cohesion, was probably the biggest
> turd I have ever had to polish. Don't get me wrng, the songs were
> good and so were the other players. But on this record, the drums
> simply had to take the back seat.
>
> The results were a mishmosh of out of tempo, bad sounding tracks with
> little on no 'feeling' at all left in them... certainly no "groove"
> what-so-ever.
>
> Every mistake an amateur could possibly have made, this recordist
> made with great flair, on each and every single track that he had
> subsequently re-recorded.... down to miking the ride cymbal with
> a 414 from about three inches away. (I never knew there was quite
> so much low end in a ride cymbal). Since he also recorded everything
> totally flat, it was difficult to find enough EQ to carve out a
> semi-smooth
> sounding cymbal.
>
>> Any comments are welcome.
>
> In general, no... I don't think this is an accepted practice at all, and
> I would certainly *never* recommend it. It's bad enough when the
> drums as a whole are recorded separately from the main rhythm
> section, let alone each piece independently. I can't even imagine
> finding a drummer who would agree with such a suggestion.
>
> --
> David Morgan (MAMS)
> http://www.m-a-m-s DOT com
> Morgan Audio Media Service
> Dallas, Texas (214) 662-9901
> _______________________________________
> http://www.artisan-recordingstudio.com
>
>
>
December 13, 2004 10:50:47 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <f020f618.0412121004.d5519fb@posting.google.com>, David
<david_m76@hotmail.com> wrote:

> My question is, could this be the result of the drummer recording the
> snare, kick and cymbals seperately? Such a technique makes sense to me
> in my head but since I've never tried it I wouldn't know how realistic
> the resulting sound would be.
>
> Any comments are welcome.
>
> Thanks,
> Dave


You forgot to mention the toms. Record them one at a time too?

Asking a drummer to do this is like asking a singer to sing a song one
note at time. "Ok, this pass just sing when it's a G."

You won't make any drummer or singer friends this way ;>

Let the mutha bang the whole drum kit. And spend a couple years
learning how to record drums.

Here'a a secret from a pro for ya: if you're serious about getting
great, real drum sounds and you want to record it yourself, hire a
great, experienced studio drummer with a great kit. You'll be more than
half way there.





David Correia
Celebration Sound
Warren, Rhode Island

CelebrationSound@aol.com
www.CelebrationSound.com
Anonymous
December 13, 2004 12:09:42 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

wrkapowell@ivnet.com wrote:

> Logan Shaw wrote:
>
>>But, what about the idea of replacing some of the parts of the drum
>>kit with dummies? For example, get a set of V-Drums, and then
>>replace the drums with V-Drums, leaving the cymbals in place, and
>>record that. Then afterwards, switch everything out so that you
>>have V-Drum cymbals and real drums, and record that.

> I would not want to do 2 passes, one with electronic cymbals and one
> with real cymbals, except as an avant-garde experiment. Talk about a
> massive "phase wash" sound. Even editing the 2 versions on a DAW to
> line up would be problematic.

Sorry, I wasn't really all that clear on what I meant there.
What I meant was, always record the real drums and never the
V-Drums. But put the V-Drums into the drummer's ears so that
even if *half* the kit is V-Drums and half is real, the drummer
still hears a complete (albeit mixed) kit. The idea is that
at least then you feel SORT of like you're playing a kit,
instead of being put in front of a bass drum and being told,
"Now play the kick drum like you would if there were a whole
kit here, and in a few minutes we're going to do the same thing
again with just the snare, and the toms after that, and...".

- Logan
Anonymous
December 13, 2004 12:49:01 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <1102895457.349757.282590@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com> tonyespinoza@aol.com writes:

> yup. i'm not entirely sure of the reasons people do this. i think
> it's partly a sound they're going for.

The other reason is that the person playing the drums isn't really a
drummer and can handle only one stick at a time. After all, people
record vocals and guitar solos one note or phrase at a time. It's
about the same thing.


--
I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
Anonymous
December 13, 2004 5:17:50 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On 12 Dec 2004 10:04:07 -0800, david_m76@hotmail.com (David) wrote:

>I hear in many modern-day recordings songs sounding like the drums are
>so isolated but not so much that they're programmed. They still sound
>live and all but the cymbals are so big and in your face without
>sounding like there's any snare in the overheads. The snare sounds
>different every time it hits but no cymbal bleed behind it in the
>centre. Overall, the drums sound like they are all live but so
>polished that there's no way gating or anything like that could get it
>to sound so punchy and seperated.
>
>My question is, could this be the result of the drummer recording the
>snare, kick and cymbals seperately? Such a technique makes sense to me
>in my head but since I've never tried it I wouldn't know how realistic
>the resulting sound would be.
>
>Any comments are welcome.
>
>Thanks,
>Dave

Try it.

It'll teach you to never, ever do it again. But you'll learn a million
other things about recording, too.

Part of my pitch for my studio and production chops is that I already
made the mistakes twenty years ago on my own that the other studio
will make next week on someone else's session. You have to live to
learn.

Seriously, give it a shot. You'll learn more by trying than from a
forum.

Drum kits are hard to do well, but it is possible. Great drummer +
great mike technique + appropriate gear = what you're looking for.




Kurt Riemann
Anonymous
December 13, 2004 8:59:47 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Kurt Riemann wrote:

> Drum kits are hard to do well, but it is possible. Great drummer +
> great mike technique + appropriate gear = what you're looking for.

As a side note, I was listening to Dave Matthews 'Crash' CD last night.
That is a hell of a drum mix. Amazing.
December 14, 2004 12:53:20 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

>The idea is that
>at least then you feel SORT of like you're playing a kit,
>instead of being put in front of a bass drum and being told,
>"Now play the kick drum like you would if there were a whole
>kit here, and in a few minutes we're going to do the same thing
>again with just the snare, and the toms after that, and...".

Believe it or not, that "play just the snare, and we'll do the high-hat next,"
etc. type of production was actually occuring on a regular basis in the 80's,
particularly in England. If I remember correctly, a few of the Duran Duran
records were made this way, and I think the producer on some of those records
(the late Alex Sadkin, I think) was famous for that. His reasoning was that he
wanted the cleanliness of each track, so he'd be able to treat each drum
without leakage.

Seems like a perfectly horrible way to make music.

John
Anonymous
December 14, 2004 8:10:04 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In the past I have had to overdub live cymbals to a drum program and it was
about as awkward a process as I can imagine. Sit there and 'air drum' the rest
of the kit. Yikes.

I agree with the guys who are recommending to hire a good drummer. I just came
off a project where the drummer's bad time was the least of his problems. He
literally did not know how to properly hold a stick or strike a drum. What an
incredible illustration of the importance of the player. In the same room, with
the same kit, same mics and preamps I have recorded drums that kick ass. The
only difference on this project was the drummer and boy did the project suffer.
We ended up triggering kick and snare but every time I hear a hit on the hi
tom, I cringe because you can hear that he's hitting the drum near the rim:
DOING (and nowhere near the center of the head). I had to edit every one of his
tom fills to make the hits reasonably consistent in level. On the first
downbeat of EVERY chorus and verse, his kick drum hit was around 10 dB louder
than the average for the other parts of the song. Good grief. At least it was
good for my Digital Performer editing chops.

On the other side of the fence, I've also had the opportunity to work
extensively with great drummers such as Bobby Rondinelli. He's a consummate
professional, and you'd have to be an idiot to mess up the sound of his drums.
He knows how to tune them, he hits them consistently and plays like a mo-fo.
When you have that to start with, the rest of the recording process is easy.

peace
Steve La Cerra
December 14, 2004 6:36:20 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Regarding that "separated sound", if you're using a DAW (which most
people seem to be doing nowadays), you can emphasize certain drums
through clever use of fades, and ducking.
December 14, 2004 6:37:58 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Regarding that "separated sound", if you're using a DAW (which most
people seem to be doing nowadays), you can emphasize certain drums
through clever use of fades, and ducking.
Anonymous
December 14, 2004 9:08:54 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Northamusi" <northamusi@aol.com> wrote in message...

> On the first
> downbeat of EVERY chorus and verse, his kick drum hit was around 10 dB louder
> than the average for the other parts of the song.


This is the very reason I quit playing drums some 20 years ago. I simply
couldn't keep my foot out of the crash in the studio.

DM
Anonymous
December 15, 2004 5:19:24 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

John <johnl16506@aol.comremove> wrote:

> Believe it or not, that "play just the snare, and we'll do the high-hat
> next," etc. type of production was actually occuring on a regular basis in
> the 80's, particularly in England. If I remember correctly, a few of the
> Duran Duran records were made this way, and I think the producer on some
> of those records (the late Alex Sadkin, I think) was famous for that. His
> reasoning was that he wanted the cleanliness of each track, so he'd be
> able to treat each drum without leakage.

Wow! I'm into 80s stuff and I'll be curious to hear actual examples of
this! Any particular songs??

-- Eric (Dero) Desrochers http://homepage.mac.com/dero72

Hiroshima 45, Tchernobyl 86, Windows 95
December 15, 2004 7:27:23 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

I think a lot of bands did that, I know the Eagles did it some. Henley
is no slouch.

The Police, Copland doing the high hat first and then the rest of the
kit, or was it the other way around. I think the hi hat first would
make the most sense, he had some very incredible patterns going on.
Good stuff Maynard.
December 15, 2004 6:39:42 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

deromax@hotmail.com (Eric Desrochers) writes:
>John <johnl16506@aol.comremove> wrote:
>> Believe it or not, that "play just the snare, and we'll do the high-hat
>> next," etc. type of production was actually occuring on a regular basis in
>> the 80's, particularly in England. If I remember correctly, a few of the
>> Duran Duran records were made this way, and I think the producer on some
>> of those records (the late Alex Sadkin, I think) was famous for that. His
>> reasoning was that he wanted the cleanliness of each track, so he'd be
>> able to treat each drum without leakage.

>Wow! I'm into 80s stuff and I'll be curious to hear actual examples of
>this! Any particular songs??

I read an article about making one of the classic jazz albums from
that era a few months back .... I think it was in Mix. They talked about
recording the toms separately from the cymbals, separately from the snare
IIRC. Sorry I can't recall more details.
December 15, 2004 6:41:01 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"db" <deanbowlus@sbcglobal.net> writes:
>The Police, Copland doing the high hat first and then the rest of the
>kit, or was it the other way around. I think the hi hat first would
>make the most sense, he had some very incredible patterns going on.
>Good stuff Maynard.

Come to think of it I think it was The Police I read about in that
Mix, not a jazz group.
Anonymous
December 15, 2004 9:20:08 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"MC" <armednhammered@yahoo.com> wrote in message news:1103057644.089226.68200@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com...
>
> Regarding that "separated sound", if you're using a DAW (which most
> people seem to be doing nowadays), you can emphasize certain drums
> through clever use of fades, and ducking.
>

The only thing that hits a DAW in my world, is a completed stereo mixdown.

But on MIDI projects, I've been tweaking decay, attack, etc., for a loooong time.

;-)


--
David Morgan (MAMS)
http://www.m-a-m-s DOT com
Morgan Audio Media Service
Dallas, Texas (214) 662-9901
_______________________________________
http://www.artisan-recordingstudio.com
Anonymous
December 15, 2004 9:20:49 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"georgeh" <georgeh@gjhsun.cl.msu.edu> wrote in message news:cpplud$1phq$2@msunews.cl.msu.edu...
> "db" <deanbowlus@sbcglobal.net> writes:
> >The Police, Copland doing the high hat first and then the rest of the
> >kit, or was it the other way around. I think the hi hat first would
> >make the most sense, he had some very incredible patterns going on.
> >Good stuff Maynard.
>
> Come to think of it I think it was The Police I read about in that
> Mix, not a jazz group.

Lots of MIDI going on there, no?
!