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DNS Cache

Tags:
  • LAN
  • Cache
  • DNS
  • Windows XP
  • Networking
Last response: in Networking
January 13, 2013 11:21:50 PM

Can anyone tell me what is the DNS cache? What is the process of clearing the DNS cache in windows XP SP2? And why do we need to clear the DNS cache?

More about : dns cache

January 14, 2013 7:02:12 AM

DNS Cache is your computer trying to keep track of recent and common URL's that you type in so that your computer doesnt have to send a request out to your DNS Server to resolve the IP address.

In XP you can open up a command prompt (Start, Run, Type "CMD" Enter) and then type in "ipconfig /flushdns" and you will get something like this result:

C:\Windows\system32>ipconfig /flushdns

Windows IP Configuration

Successfully flushed the DNS Resolver Cache.
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January 14, 2013 7:40:08 PM

A DNS (Domain Naming System) is a service that translates common website names, such as www.google.com, into their actual address, their IP address. For google, you can type "http://74.125.224.72/" instead of www.google.com and it'll go straight to the site, without utilizing your DNS server. This is done because it's easier to remember and promote google.com than it is a string of numbers and decimals.

So a DNS cache is a small amount of memory that holds a table of these translations, making it easier and faster for your computer lookup the IP address of a website. Sometimes its beneficial to clear that memory because your computer may have a problem looking up a given URL, and the request will go unresolved.

That's basically it!
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January 14, 2013 9:23:14 PM

jgutz2006 said:
DNS Cache is your computer trying to keep track of recent and common URL's that you type in so that your computer doesnt have to send a request out to your DNS Server to resolve the IP address.

In XP you can open up a command prompt (Start, Run, Type "CMD" Enter) and then type in "ipconfig /flushdns" and you will get something like this result:

C:\Windows\system32>ipconfig /flushdns

Windows IP Configuration

Successfully flushed the DNS Resolver Cache.


Does this flushing process also delete the bookmarks of the browser OR it remains unaffected??
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January 14, 2013 9:37:03 PM

calmstateofmind said:
A DNS (Domain Naming System) is a service that translates common website names, such as www.google.com, into their actual address, their IP address. For google, you can type "http://74.125.224.72/" instead of www.google.com and it'll go straight to the site, without utilizing your DNS server. This is done because it's easier to remember and promote google.com than it is a string of numbers and decimals.

So a DNS cache is a small amount of memory that holds a table of these translations, making it easier and faster for your computer lookup the IP address of a website. Sometimes its beneficial to clear that memory because your computer may have a problem looking up a given URL, and the request will go unresolved.

That's basically it!

when i use google's IP address to open it, it is opened,
but sir, when we try with another IP address to open a particular website which is not as popular as "google" how can i confirm it that the opened page is secure to visit?
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January 15, 2013 2:16:19 AM

ddreamzunlimited said:
when i use google's IP address to open it, it is opened,
but sir, when we try with another IP address to open a particular website which is not as popular as "google" how can i confirm it that the opened page is secure to visit?


Well the question would be the integrity of the website really, not necessarily the connection. But if you want to make sure you're using a secure connection to a website, you have the ability to enable a type of security precaution that encrypts all the data that's sent and received from your computer to the website and back. This is usually represented by an "https" instead of "http", with the 's' standing for secure, from within the website address.

More times than not the setting is already enabled within your browser, so it comes down to if the site supports that kind of security feature. Go to paypal.com and you'll see it, whereas on espn.com you won't. Usually sites that hold sensitive information about the user, like facebook, or those that host merchant services, tend to use https as a security measure. If you want to see a little information about your secure connection, you can usually click on the little padlock just next to the site address.
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January 15, 2013 8:02:50 PM

Just as calmstateofmind put it, look for the secure HTTPS or padlock as indication. Also you may want to try some adblock plugin:

Chrome: https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/adblock/gighm...

Firefox: https://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/addon/adblock-...

IE: http://simple-adblock.com/

As far as the initial question goes, you typically flush DNS if you have issues and a domain name is resolving to an incorrect address that has been cached, it will make your PC send out a request to grab this new address...
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January 15, 2013 9:02:12 PM

calmstateofmind said:
Well the question would be the integrity of the website really, not necessarily the connection. But if you want to make sure you're using a secure connection to a website, you have the ability to enable a type of security precaution that encrypts all the data that's sent and received from your computer to the website and back. This is usually represented by an "https" instead of "http", with the 's' standing for secure, from within the website address.

More times than not the setting is already enabled within your browser, so it comes down to if the site supports that kind of security feature. Go to paypal.com and you'll see it, whereas on espn.com you won't. Usually sites that hold sensitive information about the user, like facebook, or those that host merchant services, tend to use https as a security measure. If you want to see a little information about your secure connection, you can usually click on the little padlock just next to the site address.

And Sir! wat about the bookmarks of my browser? They remain as it is or they are deleted after "flushing DNS" operation?
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January 15, 2013 10:41:51 PM

ddreamzunlimited said:
And Sir! wat about the bookmarks of my browser? They remain as it is or they are deleted after "flushing DNS" operation?



All of your bookmarks, favorites, cookies, etc., are managed and stored within whichever Internet browser you use; they'll remain there untouched. :) 
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January 21, 2013 8:49:34 PM

calmstateofmind said:
All of your bookmarks, favorites, cookies, etc., are managed and stored within whichever Internet browser you use; they'll remain there untouched. :) 

When I tried to do this operation,I got an error , that is-

"Windows IP Configuration
Could not flush the DNS resolver cache: Function failed during execution."
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Best solution

January 21, 2013 10:30:36 PM

ddreamzunlimited said:
When I tried to do this operation,I got an error , that is-

"Windows IP Configuration
Could not flush the DNS resolver cache: Function failed during execution."


If that's the case, this should help: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/919746

Is there a specific reason you want to clear the DNS cache? Maybe if I knew what you're trying to accomplish I could offer alternate solutions? :whistle: 
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January 31, 2013 2:15:53 PM

calmstateofmind said:
If that's the case, this should help: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/919746

Is there a specific reason you want to clear the DNS cache? Maybe if I knew what you're trying to accomplish I could offer alternate solutions? :whistle: 

Yes Sir.It works.I've successfully performed this operation.
Actually I was facing problems opening some websites,and when I googled about this,I found this term (DNS cache) in most of the results and I didnt know about it earlier,thats why I asked the complete details about DNS cahe.
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January 31, 2013 2:17:21 PM

Best answer selected by ddreamzunlimited.
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