Re-install watchguard at new location. no experience in setting up at all.

Have moved our network to our new space. I tried to set everything up just the way it was... but not working.

I can some straight out of the cable modem and into my Cisco (Linksys E1000) and out to the switch/bus and my 12 or so boxes (through the bus) and three laptops (wireless) all see the Internet okay - but don't all see each other all the time.

When I plug my server into the bus (through the switch, router or directly) all but two of my boxes drop off, but the wireless connections are fine.

If I put the firebox in between - everything falls apart.

When I trouble shoot the server, I show the broadcomm as working correctly.

When I select "repair the connection" in Network Connections, I get the following: "Window could not finish repairing the problem because the following action cannot be completed: Clearing the ARP cache."

I'm lost, but cannot get a network tech in here for another week.
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  1. It would be hard to know exactly what the problem is without seeing it firsthand or even over the phone. Doing it by posdting in a thread is very diffacult because we're depending soley on the info that you provide.
    When you say 12 or so boxes what are you refering to?
    When you talk of connecting to the bus what are you refering to ?

    If you have a normal home network set up then you have a cable modem , a wireless router and your different devices that you connect to the network either wireless or wired. If you have a seperate firewall device then not all home networks will have that and that is usually connected between the moden and the router with the option to connect additional devices by ethernet cable directly to the firewall box. You would however have to include the firewall box in the network so that any devices connected to it can be also in the network.
  2. inzone said:
    It would be hard to know exactly what the problem is without seeing it firsthand or even over the phone. Doing it by posdting in a thread is very diffacult because we're depending soley on the info that you provide.
    When you say 12 or so boxes what are you refering to?
    When you talk of connecting to the bus what are you refering to ?

    If you have a normal home network set up then you have a cable modem , a wireless router and your different devices that you connect to the network either wireless or wired. If you have a seperate firewall device then not all home networks will have that and that is usually connected between the moden and the router with the option to connect additional devices by ethernet cable directly to the firewall box. You would however have to include the firewall box in the network so that any devices connected to it can be also in the network.


    Inzone: thanks for the reply!

    Good questions, and somewhat helpful. The network is for/in our office and is designated a "workplace" network.

    Re: my reference to a bus. I come from an audio engineering background and I am referring to the rack on the wall of our server room that has the input jacks for CAT5 and distribute through the building to the respective wall jacks.

    I use the term "Box" to refer to a desktop PC v. a laptop.

    The setup currently is a cable modem on the wall from which there are 5 outgoing jacks. No wireless capability from that modem. I can go directly out of that modem to the "bus" and wherever I plug in, the corresponding wall jack is live. All the jacks work as they should, in other words.

    So... then I went from the cable modem into the wireless router and out from the wireless router to an 8 position switch, then 'daisy chained' that to another 8 position switch and came out of each of those to the distribution "bus" to each of the wall jacks that corresponded to the outlets I have designated for the office PC's ("boxes"). Again, works as it should... wireless and wired.

    If I simply plug a CAT5 cable from the back of the server into the network, I lose all but 2 of my PC's (wired), but none of the laptops that are connected wirelessly. In addition, the server cannot/will not see the Internet.

    When I check for the server on either of the 2 working PC's, I get a message to the effect that the "name" for that device is already in use.

    When I try to troubleshoot the Internet connection for the server, I get the error message, "Window could not finish repairing the problem because the following action cannot be completed: Clearing the ARP cache."

    At any time, if I introduce the firebox, it starts to fall apart. I do not know how to add the firewall device to the network. I no longer have any documents/manuals for the Watchguard Firebox device we are using... but the equipment (PC's router/switches, UPS and phones) are all the same and came directly from the old office space.

    Thanks again for taking the time to respond. I hope this helps clarify some... am happy to get on the phone with you to walk through this directly, if you are willing/able. 423.829.5839 (though I am located in Atlanta, GA)

    Regards,
  3. It does clear up your set up some what and I'm more familiar with home networks than I am with a work place environment. I did work in a small office a few years back and I am familiar with the network that was in that office.
    The way it was set up was the cable modem was connected to the firewall and that firewall has four Lan ports oon the back of it. One cable would go to the server and then out of the server to a 25 port swicth and another cable would go to a wireless router to service the laptops and any other devices that needed wireless. The whole network was controlled from the corporatte office but we also had some local control also.

    I believe the way you would set your structure up would be to go from the modem to the firewall and then to your server. Reason being is that you want the firewall to protect your whole network so everything has to go through it. Then from the server go to the different switches and routers that you have. A good adapter to have in your server would be a four port network adapter so that you don't end up deleting the internet by going from switch to swicth to router and a daisy chain type of set up. Aternativly you could go from the server to a four or eight port switch and use it to distribute the internet to the other switches and routers.
    I try to simplify things because when you start making too many connections and running too many switches and routers in a daisy chain it becomes complicated and stops working the way you want it.
    I'll be the first to say that I'm not an IT person and my knowledge is limited in that area.
    If you want more detailed info on what you should do there are some people here that are very good at networking and you can send any of them a private message.
    ex_bubblehead
    Emerald
    RealBeast
    If you look through the forum and see a post from any of them you can then click on the small envelope under thier user name and send a private message.
    If nobody respods to your private message then continue to post and chances are that someone else will jump in here , if not I will continue to look in and help where I can.
  4. inzone said:
    It does clear up your set up some what and I'm more familiar with home networks than I am with a work place environment. I did work in a small office a few years back and I am familiar with the network that was in that office.
    The way it was set up was the cable modem was connected to the firewall and that firewall has four Lan ports oon the back of it. One cable would go to the server and then out of the server to a 25 port swicth and another cable would go to a wireless router to service the laptops and any other devices that needed wireless. The whole network was controlled from the corporatte office but we also had some local control also.

    I believe the way you would set your structure up would be to go from the modem to the firewall and then to your server. Reason being is that you want the firewall to protect your whole network so everything has to go through it. Then from the server go to the different switches and routers that you have. A good adapter to have in your server would be a four port network adapter so that you don't end up deleting the internet by going from switch to swicth to router and a daisy chain type of set up. Aternativly you could go from the server to a four or eight port switch and use it to distribute the internet to the other switches and routers.
    I try to simplify things because when you start making too many connections and running too many switches and routers in a daisy chain it becomes complicated and stops working the way you want it.
    I'll be the first to say that I'm not an IT person and my knowledge is limited in that area.
    If you want more detailed info on what you should do there are some people here that are very good at networking and you can send any of them a private message.
    ex_bubblehead
    Emerald
    RealBeast
    If you look through the forum and see a post from any of them you can then click on the small envelope under thier user name and send a private message.
    If nobody respods to your private message then continue to post and chances are that someone else will jump in here , if not I will continue to look in and help where I can.



    Inzone, Thanks again for your help with this. Am trying these suggestions now and will let you know.
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