Solved

Building a new computer, have a question...

I'm building my second computer here in the next few days, and I have a windows 7 question.

I bought an oem edition of windows about a couple years ago, and now I'm building a new machine, like I mentioned. I plan to use the same hard drive in the new computer, however I will be upgrading to an ssd to use as my boot drive, and the old HDD will act as file storage.

From what I've read, it's possible and at the worst may require me to call and get an activation number. However I've also read that once its installed that's it and that it ties itself to the motherboard and such. This doesn't really make any sense to me as upgrading would be a huge pain. The whole thing doesn't really make sense to me, but I'm worried so I thought I would ask the community.
9 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about building computer question
  1. Hi :)

    Firstly and lastly...its ILLEGAL...BUY a legal copy for your new build...

    All the best Brett :)
  2. Why is that? I don't mind buying a new copy (despite it being Another 100$...) but I'm currious.

    It's my copy I bought it, disk sticker and all when I built my first computer. Your post seems to suggest that I didn't buy it in the first place, which is not true. I'm not trying to run it simultaneously on two computers, it's basically a huge upgrade, I'm redo getting the old computer useless, that's all.

    If I do have to buy a new copy/key, what happens to my old key? Is it useless now? Can I never use it again since that computer is no longer in use? Can I never put a new HD in it and use it again? I don't understand why it's not possible/illegal.
  3. Best answer
    The original oem copy had a license that was valid for the original motherboard. Since you are replacing the motherboard, that license is no longer valid.

    Edit: To answer your question, your old license can still be used with the old motherboard, so it's nnot completely useless.
  4. That makes sense, however my roommate was able to replace his motherboard, and aside from a few drivers issues windows didn't seem to care. That would also mean that a motherboard can't be updated without buying a new copy of windows every single time, which doesn't seem practical to me.
  5. if you keep the mobo a constant throughout you builds then you should be able to reinstall it as you wish, but since the key is tied to the mobo, you won't be able to use the same key again in your new build. in short, buy a new copy and be on the safe side of the law.

    but, if you're feeling rebellious...

    :)
  6. Trueno07 said:
    That makes sense, however my roommate was able to replace his motherboard, and aside from a few drivers issues windows didn't seem to care. That would also mean that a motherboard can't be updated without buying a new copy of windows every single time, which doesn't seem practical to me.



    What your roommate did was illegal.

    This is one reason why it's important not to skimp on your motherboard when you build the machine in the first place. It's also a way that Microsoft encourages its customers into repeat business. You can try a free linux download if you want. http://downloadlinuxfree.com/
  7. Thanks for the advice, I've used Ubuntu several times however Im going to have to stick to windows, ya know how it is I'm sure.

    Well, it doesn't make sense but I guess I will have to fork over the 100$ for the new OS. Thanks for the help guys, even if it's not what I wanted to hear :)
  8. Best answer selected by Trueno07.
  9. Trueno07 said:
    Thanks for the advice, I've used Ubuntu several times however Im going to have to stick to windows, ya know how it is I'm sure.

    Well, it doesn't make sense but I guess I will have to fork over the 100$ for the new OS. Thanks for the help guys, even if it's not what I wanted to hear :)


    :) glad to help and wish you luck!
Ask a new question

Read More

Computers Hard Drives Windows 7