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PSU Voltage and Wattage explain

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January 6, 2003 10:30:37 AM

I'm about to blow my computer into a million pieces, (well in photoshop at least) I really need somebody to explain a Power Supply Unit's Wattage Merits, I guess I'll get 400W and more importantly the meanings of all those 12V, 3.3V, 5V etc, I have a small screen shot, (entire link under 140K) at http://home.iprimus.com.au/lmm16/help/ please see my voltage readings and tell me what they mean, PLEASE!!!

And Thank you all (oh, and keep it in english please, don't even think of mentioning a multimiter, or something)

UPDATE: --- Fixed the url, I missed the .au part.
again please check : http://home.iprimus.com.au/lmm16/help&lt;P ID="edit"><FONT SIZE=-1><EM>Edited by UDHA on 01/07/03 06:58 PM.</EM></FONT></P>
January 7, 2003 12:22:51 AM

Ive found the rated wattage is of little importance.

What is important is the Maximum current that can be prawn from each of the 'rails' 12v, 5v and 3.3v.

E.G. ive seen a 300W enermax provide more useful current than a 350W generic PSU.


<b><i>The Very Hungry Caterpillar</i> - George W. Bush's favorite childhood book.
Note: This book was first published a year after Mr Bush graduated from College.</b>
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January 8, 2003 1:47:36 AM

Most important is the stability of the 3.3,5 and 12v rails. If these fluctuate much under heavy load then you can have stability issues. Also a 400psu can mean many things. See Tom's guide of 12 PSU's and you'll see what I mean. If you buy a new PSU get a quality unit like Fortron/Sparkle, TTGI, Antec etc. The Conrad is the Fortron FSP350 in Tom's guide, also the 300 Fortron is under Verax. Note the part numbers start with FSP(Fortron Source Power). Please not the ability of these pieces too. Far better than their numbers indicate. Seems like three of them burned up before they reached their rated power even.
January 8, 2003 5:39:53 AM

I posted this after reading that, the thing is, these results don't fluctuate, do you know what those readings mean? are they bad results? did you see the screen shot I linked to? I don't notice them moving up or down, but to have them at those levels, is that not a good sign? thanks for your help.
January 8, 2003 11:57:19 PM

I took a look. Hello there fellow Auzzie :smile:
Your voltages dont look bad.
Your heatsink isnt fantastic but its not too bad.
Personally i wouldnt worry about your cpu temp unless you start experiencing lockups.

Temperature detection is very rough and variable with AMD systems, and Asus boards are known to read higher than others.

<b><i>The Very Hungry Caterpillar</i> - George W. Bush's favorite childhood book.
Note: This book was first published a year after Mr Bush graduated from College.</b>
January 9, 2003 4:39:39 PM

If your PC runs stable with those temps and voltages then no problem.
You can ignore the negative (-5 and -12V) voltages cause they aren't important. And all your other voltages are within spec.

My PC eats so much money that I'm in 'desperate' need of it to buy PC3500 RAM, help Svol with his OC project!
--- PM me for information.
January 10, 2003 7:40:51 AM

I thank everybody for contributing their piece, just fyi, I'm going to replace the heat sink and fan as it is noisy, it vibrates the entire desk violently enough to notice and irritate, and I managed to place my finger in such a predicament that it proceded to snap off two fins of the fan. I super glued them back on, but it is now even loader, and I think they are pretty week, so I haven't been using my computer too much recently.

Also, my computer sometimes restarts for no apparent reason, maybe when it accesses all hdd's at once? and the last time, (today) it did it when I insered my USB memory drive, (as that draws power) what else would have caused this sudden shutdown?

I will replace my HSF with a Volcano 7+ as their speed I can control, and have very quite, even 35db at medium is quiter than this fan.

thanks again and hellow to all fellow aussies! G'day mates!
January 10, 2003 11:26:14 AM

Well you have to monitor the voltages during such account and see if they drop. If they drop a lot then your PSU can be overloaded.

My PC eats so much money that I'm in 'desperate' need of it to buy PC3500 RAM, help Svol with his OC project!
--- PM me for information.
!